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TITLE:  Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella recovered from processed poultry
 
AUTHORS:  Parveen S;Taabodi M;Schwarz JG;Oscar TP;Harter-Dennis J;White DG;
 
YEAR:  2007
 
JOURNAL ABBREV:  J Food Prot
 
MONTH:  Nov
 
TYPE:  JOUR
 
REFMAN INDEX:  198
 
JOURNAL FULL:  Journal of food protection
 
VOLUME:  70
 
ISSUE:  11
 
START PAGE:  2466
 
END PAGE:  2472
 
KEYWORDS:  Ampicillin;analysis;Animals;Anti-Bacterial Agents;Chickens;Colony Count,Microbial;Consumer Product Safety;drug effects;Drug Resistance,Bacterial;Drug Resistance,Multiple,Bacterial;Food;Food Contamination;Food Microbiology;growth & development;Humans;Maryland;Meat;methods;Microbial Sensitivity Tests;microbiology;pharmacology;Poultry;Prevalence;Research;Salmonella;Salmonella typhimurium;Streptomycin;Tetracycline;Water;
 
ABSTRACT:  This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolates recovered from processed poultry. Four hundred eighty pre- and postchill whole broiler chicken carcasses were collected from a poultry processing plant between July 2004 and June 2005. Water samples also were collected at the entrance and exit of the chiller. After preenrichment, carcass and water samples were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using the automated BAX system followed by traditional culture methods. The proportions of pre- and postchill carcasses that were positive for Salmonella were 88.4 and 84.1%, respectively. Ninety-two percent of water samples collected at the entrance of the chiller were positive for Salmonella, but all exit samples were negative. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of Salmonella between pre- and postchill carcasses (P > 0.05). Salmonella isolates recovered were serotyped and tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials. Thirteen serotypes were identified; the most common were Salmonella Kentucky (59.5%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (17.8%). Three hundred thirty-nine (79.8%) of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and 53.4% were resistant to three or more antimicrobials. Resistance was most often observed to tetracycline (73.4% of isolates), ampicillin (52.9%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (52%), ceftiofur (51.7%), streptomycin (35.2%), and sulfisoxazole (21.8%). These results indicate the high prevalence of Salmonella contamination in whole broiler carcasses, and a large number of these Salmonella isolates were resistant to commonly used antimicrobials
 
AFFILIATIONS:  Food Science and Technology Program, Department of Agriculture, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853, USA. sparveen@umes.edu
 
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