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TITLE:  Characterization of Escherichia coli isolates incriminated in colisepticaemia in mink
 
AUTHORS:  Tibbetts RJ;White DG;Dyer NW;Giddings CW;Nolan LK;
 
YEAR:  2003
 
JOURNAL ABBREV:  Vet Res Commun
 
MONTH:  Jul
 
TYPE:  JOUR
 
REFMAN INDEX:  230
 
JOURNAL FULL:  Veterinary research communications
 
VOLUME:  27
 
ISSUE:  5
 
START PAGE:  341
 
END PAGE:  357
 
KEYWORDS:  Ampicillin;Animals;Bacterial Capsules;biosynthesis;Capsules;chemistry;classification;Colicins;Conjugation,Genetic;Dna;DNA,Bacterial;drug effects;Drug Resistance,Multiple,Bacterial;Enterobactin;Escherichia coli;Escherichia coli Infections;Escherichia coli Proteins;Food;genetics;Hemolysin Proteins;Hemolysis;Hydroxamic Acids;Kanamycin;Laboratories;metabolism;Microbial Sensitivity Tests;microbiology;Mink;pathology;Phenotype;Plasmids;Polymerase Chain Reaction;Proteins;R Factors;Research;Sepsis;Streptomycin;Sulfamethoxazole;Tetracycline;veterinary;Veterinary Medicine;Virulence;
 
ABSTRACT:  Colisepticaemia is a major health and economic concern for the mink industry, yet little information is available about the Escherichia coli that cause this disease. In this study, 40 E. coli, isolated from mink clinically diagnosed with colisepticaemia that had been submitted to the North Dakota State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, were randomly selected for characterization. These isolates were serotyped and screened for resistance to 18 antimicrobials, possession of transmissible R plasmids, and the presence of several virulence traits or genes using bioassays or the polymerase chain reaction. Several serotypes were identified that have previously been associated with septicaemia in other animal species. The majority of the isolates exhibited multiple antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Common resistance phenotypes observed included those to tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, ampicillin and kanamycin. Several of the isolates that could be studied by conjugation contained transmissible R plasmids coding for multiple antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. About half of the isolates produced colicin; all produced enterobactin: and all but one-quarter produced aerobactin. None of the isolates tested produced enterohaemolysin, and one-fifth were considered to be beta haemolytic. About half appeared to contain the gene encoding cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1; three contained the gene encoding EAE, but none appeared to contain the genes coding for LT, Sta/b, SLT-I/II or CNF-II toxins or K99 antigen. Approximately one-third of the isolates elaborated capsule. The results show that the E. coli isolates implicated in mink colisepticaemia possess similar virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance phenotypes to those associated with diarrhoeal diseases in food animals
 
AFFILIATIONS:  Department of Veterinary Pathology, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, 1175 Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
 
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