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TITLE:  Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 from animals and humans
 
AUTHORS:  Schroeder CM;Meng J;Zhao S;DebRoy C;Torcolini J;Zhao C;McDermott PF;Wagner DD;Walker RD;White DG;
 
YEAR:  2002
 
JOURNAL ABBREV:  Emerg Infect Dis
 
MONTH:  Dec
 
TYPE:  JOUR
 
REFMAN INDEX:  239
 
JOURNAL FULL:  Emerging infectious diseases
 
VOLUME:  8
 
ISSUE:  12
 
START PAGE:  1409
 
END PAGE:  1414
 
KEYWORDS:  Ampicillin;Animals;Chloramphenicol;classification;drug effects;Drug Resistance,Bacterial;Escherichia coli;Escherichia coli O157;Food;genetics;Humans;isolation & purification;Maryland;Microbial Sensitivity Tests;Research;Serotyping;Streptomycin;Sulfamethoxazole;Tetracycline;Virulence;
 
ABSTRACT:  Susceptibilities to fourteen antimicrobial agents important in clinical medicine and agriculture were determined for 752 Escherichia coli isolates of serotypes O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145. Strains of these serotypes may cause urinary tract and enteric infections in humans and have been implicated in infections with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Approximately 50% of the 137 isolates from humans were resistant to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, cephalothin, tetracycline, or streptomycin, and approximately 25% were resistant to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Approximately 50% of the 534 isolates from food animals were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Of 195 isolates with STEC-related virulence genes, approximately 40% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Findings from this study suggest antimicrobial resistance is widespread among E. coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 inhabiting humans and food animals
 
AFFILIATIONS:  University of Maryland, College Park, USA
 
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