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TITLE:  A soxRS-constitutive mutation contributing to antibiotic resistance in a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica (Serovar typhimurium)
 
AUTHORS:  Koutsolioutsou A;Martins EA;White DG;Levy SB;Demple B;
 
YEAR:  2001
 
JOURNAL ABBREV:  Antimicrob Agents Chemother
 
MONTH:  Jan
 
TYPE:  JOUR
 
REFMAN INDEX:  94
 
JOURNAL FULL:  Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
 
VOLUME:  45
 
ISSUE:  1
 
START PAGE:  38
 
END PAGE:  43
 
KEYWORDS:  Anti-Bacterial Agents;Anti-Infective Agents;Bacteria;Blotting,Northern;Chloramphenicol;Ciprofloxacin;drug effects;Drug Resistance,Microbial;Escherichia coli;Genes,Bacterial;genetics;Humans;Laboratories;Microbial Sensitivity Tests;microbiology;Mutation;Nalidixic Acid;Nitric Oxide;pharmacology;Phenotype;Plasmids;Point Mutation;Public Health;Quinolones;Research;Salmonella;Salmonella enterica;Salmonella Infections;Tetracycline;Tetracyclines;
 
ABSTRACT:  The soxRS regulon is activated by redox-cycling drugs such as paraquat and by nitric oxide. The >15 genes of this system provide resistance to both oxidants and multiple antibiotics. An association between clinical quinolone resistance and elevated expression of the soxRS regulon has been observed in Escherichia coli, but this association has not been explored for other enteropathogenic bacteria. Here we describe a soxRS-constitutive mutation in a clinical strain of Salmonella enterica (serovar Typhimurium) that arose with the development of resistance to quinolones during treatment. The elevated quinolone resistance in this strain derived from a point mutation in the soxR gene and could be suppressed in trans by multicopy wild-type soxRS. Multiple-antibiotic resistance was also transferred to a laboratory strain of S. enterica by introducing the cloned mutant soxR gene from the clinical strain. The results show that constitutive expression of soxRS can contribute to antibiotic resistance in clinically relevant S. enterica
 
AFFILIATIONS:  Department of Cancer Cell Biology and Division of Biological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
 
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