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TITLE:  Use of the double-isotope, single-injection method for estimating renal function in normal and polybrominated biphenyl-exposed dairy cows
 
AUTHORS:  Mercer HD;Willett LB;Schandbacher FL;Moorhead PD;Powers TE;
 
YEAR:  1978
 
JOURNAL ABBREV:  Am J Vet Res
 
MONTH:  Aug
 
TYPE:  JOUR
 
REFMAN INDEX:  425
 
JOURNAL FULL:  American journal of veterinary research
 
VOLUME:  39
 
ISSUE:  8
 
START PAGE:  1262
 
END PAGE:  1268
 
KEYWORDS:  Adult;Animals;Biphenyl Compounds;blood;blood supply;Cattle;Cattle Diseases;chemically induced;diagnosis;diagnostic use;Dogs;Female;Glomerular Filtration Rate;Half-Life;Iodohippuric Acid;Iothalamic Acid;Kidney;Kidney Function Tests;methods;Polybrominated Biphenyls;Regional Blood Flow;Research;toxicity;veterinary;
 
ABSTRACT:  A method is described for conducting a rapid and efficient renal function test in dairy cattle. The method, adapted from methods used for man and dogs, utilizes radiolabeled 131I-sodium iodohippurate to determine effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and 125I-sodium iothalamate to determine glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The mean GFR for adult cattle was determined to be 2.8 +/- 0.4 ml/kg/minute with a biological half-life of 35.5 +/- 1.4 minutes. The mean ERPF was found to be 10.5 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/minute with a half-life of 17.9 +/- 0.6 minutes. These values are comparable with those in man, but are lower than values in dogs. A toxcity study was done with dairy cattle exposed to polybrominated biphenyls (PBB). Efforts were made to determine the amount of time required for kidney lesions to develop and, if possible, to delineate the potential site of action of PBB. Apparently PBB do not affect GFR or ERPF, even though they produce nephrotoxic effects. Potential mechanisms to explain these results are described
 
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