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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

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Help | More About 21CFR
[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 2]
[Revised as of April 1, 2014]
[CITE: 21CFR133]





TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
SUBCHAPTER B--FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
 
PART 133CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS
 

Subpart B--Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products

Sec. 133.102 Asiago fresh and asiago soft cheese.

(a) Asiago fresh cheese, asiago soft cheese, is the food prepared from milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It contains not more than 45 percent of moisture, and its solids contain not less than 50 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). It is cured for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial blue or green coloring in a quantity which neutralizes any natural yellow coloring in the curd may be added. Sufficient rennet, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, or both, with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the milk, is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, stirred, and heated to promote and regulate separation of the whey from the curd. The whey is drained off. When the curd is sufficiently firm it is removed from the kettle or vat, further drained for a short time, packed into hoops, and pressed. The pressed curd is salted in brine and cured in a well-ventilated room. During curing the surface of the cheese is occasionally rubbed with a vegetable oil. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of asiago fresh cheese may be added during the procedure in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c)(1) For the purposes of this section, the word "milk" means cow's milk, which may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or by adding thereto one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk, water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk used.

(2) Such milk may be bleached by the use of benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, sufficient vitamin A is added to the curd to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(e) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49013, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2891, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.103 Asiago medium cheese.

Asiago medium cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients prescribed by 133.102 for asiago fresh cheese, except that it contains not more than 35 percent moisture, its solids contain not less than 45 percent of milkfat, and it is cured for not less than 6 months.

[58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.104 Asiago old cheese.

Asiago old cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients prescribed by 133.102 for asiago fresh cheese, except that it contains not more than 32 percent moisture, its solids contain not less than 42 percent of milk fat, and it is cured for not less than 1 year.

[58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.106 Blue cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2), of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It is characterized by the presence of bluish-green mold, Penicillium roquefortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 46 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Blue cheese is at least 60 days old.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be homogenized, bleached, warmed, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into smaller portions and allowed to stand for a time. The mixed curd and whey is placed in forms permitting further drainage. While the curd is being placed in forms, spores of the mold Penicillium roquefortii are added. The forms are turned several times during drainage. When sufficiently drained, the shaped curd is removed from the forms and salted with dry salt or brine. Perforations are then made in the shaped curd, and it is held at a temperature of approximately 50 deg. F. at 90 to 95 percent relative humidity, until the characteristic mold growth has developed. During storage the surface of the cheese may be scraped to remove surface growth of undesirable microorganisms. Antimycotics may be applied to the surface of the whole cheese. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Blue or green color in an amount to neutralize the natural yellow color of the curd.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, applied to the surface of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages or to the surface of the bulk cheese during curing.

(v) Benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate used to bleach the dairy ingredients. The weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk being bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, vitamin A is added to the curd in such quantity as to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(vi) Vegetable fats or oils, which may be hydrogenated, used as a coating for the rind.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "blue cheese."

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2742, Jan. 21, 1983, as amended at 54 FR 32052, Aug. 4, 1989; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.108 Brick cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Brick cheese is the food prepared from dairy ingredients and other ingredients specified in this section by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 44 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of brick cheese is not more than 5 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is brought to a temperature of about 88 deg. F and subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culutre. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into cubes with sides approximately 3/8 inch long, and stirred and heated so that the temperature rises slowly to about 96 deg. F. The stirring is continued until the curd is sufficiently firm. Part of the whey is then removed, and the mixture diluted with water or salt brine to control the acidity. The curd is transferred to forms, and drained. During drainage it is pressed and turned. After drainage the curd is salted, and the biological curing agents characteristic of brick cheese are applied to the surface. The cheese is then cured to develop the characteristics of brick cheese. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative level of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "brick cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32052, Aug. 4, 1989; 54 FR 35756, Aug. 29, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993; 58 FR 17105, Apr. 1, 1993]

Sec. 133.109 Brick cheese for manufacturing.

Brick cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity for brick cheese prescribed by 133.108, except that the dairy ingredients are not pasteurized and curing is not required.

[54 FR 32053, Aug. 4, 1989]

Sec. 133.111 Caciocavallo siciliano cheese.

(a) Caciocavallo siciliano cheese is the food prepared from cow's milk or sheep's milk or goat's milk or mixtures of two or all of these and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It has a stringy texture, and is made in oblong shapes. It contains not more than 40 percent of moisture, and its solids contain not less than 42 percent milkfat as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). It is cured for not less than 90 days at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial blue or green coloring in a quantity which neutralizes any natural yellow coloring in the curd may be added. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, stirred, and heated so as to promote and regulate the separation of whey from curd. The whey is drained off, and the curd is removed to another vat containing hot whey, in which it is soaked for several hours. This whey is withdrawn, the curd is allowed to mat, and is cut into blocks. These are washed in hot whey until the desired elasticity is obtained. The curd is removed from the vat, drained, pressed into oblong forms, dried, and salted in brine, and cured. It may be paraffined. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of caciocavallo siciliano cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c)(1) For the purposes of this section, the word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any such concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Such milk may be bleached by the use of benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, sufficient vitamin A is added to the curd to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the cheese during the kneading and stretching process and/or applied to the surface of the cheese.

(e) When caciocavallo siciliano cheese is made solely from cow's milk, the name of such cheese is "Caciocavallo siciliano cheese". When made from sheep's milk or goat's milk or mixtures of these, or one or both of these with cow's milk, the name is followed by the words "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milks used, in order of predominance by weight.

(f) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 42 FR 39102, Aug. 2, 1977; 48 FR 49013, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.113 Cheddar cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Cheddar cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids, and the maximum moisture content is 39 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of cheddar cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed, treated with hydrogen peroxide/catalase, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. The whey is drained off, and the curd is matted into a cohesive mass. The mass is cut into slabs, which are so piled and handled as to promote the drainage of whey and the development of acidity. The slabs are then cut into pieces, which may be rinsed by sprinkling or pouring water over them, with free and continuous drainage; but the duration of such rinsing is so limited that only the whey on the surface of such pieces is removed. The curd is salted, stirred, further drained, and pressed into forms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial orgin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, applied to the surface of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages.

(v) Hydrogen peroxide, followed by a sufficient quantity of catalase preparation to eliminate the hydrogen peroxide. The weight of the hydrogen peroxide shall not exceed 0.05 percent of the weight of the milk and the weight of the catalase shall not exceed 20 parts per million of the weight of the milk treated.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "cheddar cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order or predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2743, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.114 Cheddar cheese for manufacturing.

Cheddar cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for cheddar cheese by 133.113, except that the milk is not pasteurized, curing is not required, and the provisions of paragraph (b)(3)(iv) of that section do not apply.

[48 FR 2743, Jan. 21, 1983]

Sec. 133.116 Low sodium cheddar cheese.

Low sodium cheddar cheese is the food prepared from the same ingredients and in the same manner prescribed in 133.113 for cheddar cheese and complies with all the provisions of 133.113, including the requirements for label statement of ingredients, except that:

(a) It contains not more than 96 milligrams of sodium per pound of finished food.

(b) The name of the food is "low sodium cheddar cheese". The letters in the words "low sodium" shall be of the same size and style of type as the letters in the words "cheddar cheese", wherever such words appear on the label.

(c) If a salt substitute is used, the label shall bear the statement "___ added as a salt substitute", the blank being filled in with the common name or names of the ingredient or ingredients used as a salt substitute.

(d) Low sodium cheddar cheese is subject to 105.69 of this chapter.

[48 FR 2743, Jan. 21, 1983]

Sec. 133.118 Colby cheese.

(a) Colby cheese is the food prepared from milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It contains not more than 40 percent of moisture, and its solids contain not less than 50 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). If the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. Sufficient rennet, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, or both, with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the milk, is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. A part of the whey is drained off, and the curd is cooled by adding water, the stirring being continued so as to prevent the pieces of curd from matting. The curd is drained, salted, stirred, further drained, and pressed into forms. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of colby cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) For the purposes of this section:

(1) The word "milk" means cow's milk, which may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or by adding thereto one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk, water, in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk used.

(2) Milk shall be deemed to have been pasteurized if it has been held at a temperature of not less than 143 deg. F for a period of not less than 30 minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. Colby cheese shall be deemed not to have been made from pasteurized milk if 0.25 gram shows a phenol equivalent of more than 3 micrograms when tested by the method prescribed in 133.5(c).

(3) During the cheesemaking process the milk may be treated with hydrogen peroxide/catalase as provided in 133.113(a)(3).

(d)(1) Colby cheese in the form of slices or cuts may have added to it a clear aqueous solution prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke in water.

(2) Colby cheese in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight calculated as sorbic acid.

(e)(1) If colby cheese has added to it a clear aqueous solution prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke in water as provided in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the name of the food is immediately followed by the words "with added smoke flavoring" with all words in this phrase of the same type size, style, and color without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter.

(2) If colby cheese in sliced or cut form contains an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient as specified in paragraph (d)(2) of this section, the label shall bear the statement "___ added to retard mold growth" or "___ added as a preservative", the blank being filled in with the common name or names of the mold-inhibiting ingredient or ingredients used.

(3) Wherever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the statement specified in paragraph (e)(2) of this section, showing the optional ingredient used, shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name, without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter except for the statement "with added smoke flavoring," as set forth in paragraph (e)(1) of this section.

(f) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.119 Colby cheese for manufacturing.

Colby cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for colby cheese by 133.118, except that the milk is not pasteurized, curing is not required, and the provisions of paragraph (d) of that section do not apply.

Sec. 133.121 Low sodium colby cheese.

Low sodium colby cheese is the food prepared from the same ingredients and in the same manner prescribed in 133.118 for colby cheese and complies with all the provisions of 133.118, including the requirements for label statement of ingredients, except that:

(a) Salt is not used. Any safe and suitable ingredient or combination of ingredients that contains no sodium and that is recognized as a salt substitute may be used.

(b) Sodium sorbate is not used.

(c) It contains not more than 96 milligrams of sodium per pound of finished food.

(d) The name of the food is "low sodium colby cheese". The letters in the words "low sodium" shall be of the same size and style of type as the letters in the words "colby cheese", wherever such words appear on the label.

(e) If a salt substitute as provided for in paragraph (a) of this section is used, the label shall bear the statement "___ added as a salt substitute", the blank being filled in with the common name or names of the ingredient or ingredients used as a salt substitute.

(f) Low sodium colby cheese is subject to 105.69 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.123 Cold-pack and club cheese.

(a)(1) Cold-pack cheese, club cheese, is the food prepared by comminuting, without the aid of heat, one or more cheeses of the same or two or more varieties, except cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, lowfat cottage cheese, cottage cheese dry curd, hard grating cheese, semisoft part-skim cheese, part-skim spiced cheese and skim milk cheese for manufacturing, into a homogeneous plastic mass. One or more of the optional ingredients designated in paragraph (c) of this section may be used.

(2) All cheeses used in a cold-pack cheese are made from pasteurized milk or are held for not less than 60 days at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F before being comminuted.

(3)(i) The moisture content of a cold-pack cheese made from a single variety of cheese is not more than the maximum moisture content prescribed by the definition and standard of identity, if any there be, for the variety of cheese used. If there is no applicable definition and standard of identity, or if such standard contains no provision as to maximum moisture content, no water is used in the preparation of the cold-pack cheese.

(ii) The fat content of the solids of a cold-pack cheese made from a single variety of cheese is not less than the minimum prescribed by the definition and standard of identity, if any there be, for the variety of cheese used, but in no case is less than 47 percent, except that the fat content of the solids of cold-pack swiss cheese is not less than 43 percent, and the fat content of the solids of cold-pack gruyere cheese is not less than 45 percent.

(4)(i) The moisture content of a cold-pack cheese made from two or more varieties of cheese is not more than the arithmetical average of the maximum moisture contents prescribed by the definitions and standards of identity, if any there be, for the varieties of cheese used, but in no case is the moisture content more than 42 percent, except that the moisture content of a cold-pack cheese made from two or more of the varieties cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese is not more than 39 percent.

(ii) The fat content of the solids of a cold-pack cheese made from two or more varieties of cheese is not less than the arithmetical average of the minimum percent of fat prescribed by the definitions and standards of identity, if any there be, for the varieties of cheese used, but in no case is less than 47 percent, except that the fat content of the solids of a cold-pack cheese made from swiss cheese and gruyere cheese is not less than 45 percent.

(5) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a), (b), and (d).

(6) The weight of each variety of cheese in a cold-pack cheese made from two varieties of cheese is not less than 25 percent of the total weight of both, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, or gorgonzola cheese is not less than 10 percent of the total weight of both, and the weight of limburger cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of both. The weight of each variety of cheese in a cold-pack cheese made from three or more varieties of cheese is not less than 15 percent of the total weight of all, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, or gorgonzola cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of all, and the weight of limburger cheese is not less than 3 percent of the total weight of all. These limits do not apply to the quantity of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese in mixtures which are designated as "American cheese" as prescribed in paragraph (d)(2) of this section. Such mixtures are considered as one variety of cheese for the purpose of this paragraph (a)(6).

(b) Cold-pack cheese may be smoked, or the cheese or cheeses from which it is made may be smoked, before comminuting and mixing, or it may contain substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke.

(c) The optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1) An acidifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, lactic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, and phosphoric acid, in such quantity that the pH of the finished cold-pack cheese is not below 4.5. For the purposes of this section vinegar is considered to be acetic acid.

(2) Water.

(3) Salt.

(4) Harmless artificial coloring.

(5) Spices or flavorings, other than any which singly or in combination with other ingredients simulate the flavor of a cheese of any age or variety.

(6) Cold-pack cheese in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight, calculated as sorbic acid or consisting of not more than 0.3 percent by weight of sodium propionate, calcium propionate, or a combination of sodium propionate and calcium propionate.

(d)(1) The name of a cold-pack cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Cold-pack ___ cheese", "___ cold-pack cheese" or "___ club cheese", the blanks being filled in with the name or names of the varieties of cheese used, in order of predominance by weight.

(2) If the cold-pack cheese is made of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, or granular cheese or any mixture of two or more of these, it may be designated "Cold-pack American cheese"; or when cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these is combined with other varieties of cheese in the cheese ingredient any of such cheeses or such mixture may be designated as "American cheese".

(3) The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (f) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(e) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, including smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke, that characterizes the product as specified in 101.22 of this chapter and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.

(f) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these, may be designated as "American cheese".

(1) Artificial coloring need not be declared.

(2) If the cheese ingredient contains cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these, such cheese or such mixture may be designated as "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food.

(a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the food prepared by comminuting and mixing, without the aid of heat, one or more of the optional cheese ingredients prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section with one or more of the optional dairy ingredients prescribed in paragraph (d) of this section, into a homogeneous plastic mass. One or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (e) of this section may be used.

(2) All cheeses used in a cold-pack cheese food are made from pasteurized milk, or are held for not less than 60 days at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F before being comminuted.

(3) The moisture content of a cold-pack cheese food is not more than 44 percent, and the fat content is not less than 23 percent.

(4) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d), except that in determining moisture the loss in weight which occurs in drying for 5 hours, under the conditions prescribed in such method, is taken as the weight of moisture.

(5) The weight of the cheese ingredient prescribed by paragraph (a)(1) of this section constitutes not less than 51 percent of the weight of the finished cold-pack cheese food.

(6) The weight of each variety of cheese in the cold-pack cheese food made with two varieties of cheese is not less than 25 percent of the total weight of both, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 10 percent of the total weight of both. The weight of each variety of cheese in the cold-pack cheese food made with three or more varieties of cheese is not less than 15 percent of the total weight of all, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of all. These limits do not apply to the quantity of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese in mixtures which are designated as "American cheese" as prescribed in paragraph (h)(5) of this section. Such mixtures are considered as one variety of cheese for the purposes of this paragraph (a)(6).

(b) Cold-pack cheese food may be smoked, or the cheese or cheeses from which it is made may be smoked, before comminuting and mixing, or it may contain substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke.

(c) The optional cheese ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are: One or more cheeses of the same or two or more varieties, except that cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, creamed cottage cheese, cook cheese, and skim-milk cheese for manufacturing are not used, and except that semisoft part-skim cheese, part-skim spiced cheese, and hard grating cheese may not be used, alone or in combination with each other, as the cheese ingredient.

(d) The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are: Cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey, any of the foregoing from which part of the water has been removed, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, skim milk cheese for manufacturing, and albumin from cheese whey. All optional dairy ingredients used in cold-pack cheese food are pasteurized or made from products that have been pasteurized.

(e) The other optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1) An acidifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, lactic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, and phosphoric acid, in such quantity that the pH of the finished cold-pack cheese food is not below 4.5.

(2) Water.

(3) Salt.

(4) Harmless artificial coloring.

(5) Spices or flavorings, other than any which singly or in combination with other ingredients simulate the flavor of cheese of any age or variety.

(6) A sweetening agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Sugar, dextrose, corn sugar, corn sirup, corn sirup solids, glucose sirup, glucose sirup solids, maltose, malt sirup, and hydrolyzed lactose, in a quantity necessary for seasoning.

(7) Cold-pack cheese food in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight, calculated as sorbic acid or consisting of not more than 0.3 percent by weight of sodium propionate, calcium propionate, or a combination of sodium propionate and calcium propionate.

(8) In the preparation of cold-pack cheese food, guar gum or xanthan gum, or both, may be used, but the total quantity of such ingredient or combination is not to exceed 0.3 percent of the weight of the finished food. When one or both such optional ingredients is used, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate complying with the requirements of 172.810 of this chapter may be used in a quantity not in excess of 0.5 percent by weight of such ingredient or ingredients.

(f) The name of the food is "cold-pack cheese food". The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of (other than in an ingredient statement any ingredient appears on the label as specified in paragraph (h) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(g) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, including smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke, that characterizes the product as specified in 101.22 of this chapter and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.

(h) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these, may be designated as "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.125 Cold-pack cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Cold-pack cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats or mixtures of these is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for cold pack cheese food by 133.124, except that:

(1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent.

(2) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared fresh, cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) and (d) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a cold-pack cheese food with fruits, vegetables or meats is "Cold-pack cheese food with ___", the blank being filled in with the common or usual name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.127 Cook cheese, koch kaese.

(a) Description. (1) Cook cheese, koch kaese, is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The maximum moisture content is 80 percent by weight, as determined by the method described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized.

(2) The phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of cook cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, so as to separate the curd and whey. The whey is drained from the curd and the curd is cured for 2 or 3 days. It is then heated to a temperature of not less than 180 deg. F until the hot curd will drop from a ladle with a consistency like that of honey. The hot cheese is filled into packages and cooled. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Nonfat milk as defined in 133.3.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(ii) Culture of white mold.

(iii) Pasteurized cream.

(iv) Caraway seed.

(v) Salt.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "cook cheese" or, alternatively, "koch kaese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130, except that enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[54 FR 32053, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 55 FR 51409, Dec. 14, 1990; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.128 Cottage cheese.

(a) Cottage cheese is the soft uncured cheese prepared by mixing cottage cheese dry curd with a creaming mixture as provided in paragraph (b) of this section. The milkfat content is not less than 4 percent by weight of the finished food, within limits of good manufacturing practice. The finished food contains not more than 80 percent of moisture, as determined by the method prescribed in 133.129(a).

(b) The creaming mixture is prepared from safe and suitable ingredients including, but not limited to, milk or substances derived from milk. Any ingredients used that are not derived from milk shall serve a useful function other than building the total solids content of the finished food, and shall be used in a quantity not greater than is reasonably required to accomplish their intended effect. The creaming mixture shall be pasteurized; however, heat labile ingredients, such as bacterial starters, may be added following pasteurization.

(c) The name of the food consists of the following two phrases which shall appear together:

(1) The words "cottage cheese" which shall appear in type of the same size and style.

(2) The statement "not less than _ percent milkfat" or "_ percent milkfat minimum", the blank being filled in with the whole number that is closest to, but does not exceed, the actual fat content of the product. This statement of fat content shall appear in letters not less than one-half of the height of the letters in the phrase specified in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, but in no case less than one-eighth of an inch in height.

(d) When the optional process described in 133.129(b)(1) (ii) or (iii) is used to make the cottage cheese dry curd used in cottage cheese, the label shall bear the statement "Directly set" or "Curd set by direct acidification". Wherever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be seen under customary conditions of purchase, the statement specified in this paragraph, showing the optional process used, shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter.

(e) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that milk-clotting enzymes may be declared by the word "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.129 Dry curd cottage cheese.

(a) Cottage cheese dry curd is the soft uncured cheese prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. The finished food contains less than 0.5 percent milkfat. It contains not more than 80 percent of moisture, as determined by the method prescribed in 133.5(a).

(b)(1) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is pasteurized; calcium chloride may be added in a quantity of not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the mix; thereafter one of the following methods is employed:

(i) Harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, with or without rennet and/or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, are added and it is held until it becomes coagulated. The coagulated mass may be cut; it may be warmed; it may be stirred; it is then drained. The curd may be washed with water and further drained; it may be pressed, chilled, worked, seasoned with salt; or

(ii) Food grade phosphoric acid, lactic acid, citric acid, or hydrochloric acid, with or without rennet and/or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, is added in such amount as to reach a pH of between 4.5 and 4.7; coagulation to a firm curd is achieved while heating to a maximum of 120 deg. F without agitation during a continuous process. The coagulated mass may be cut; it may be warmed; it may be stirred; it is then drained. The curd is washed with water, stirred, and further drained. It may be pressed, chilled, worked, seasoned with salt.

(iii) Food grade acids as provided in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section, D-Glucono-delta-lactone with or without rennet, and/or other safe and suitable milk clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, are added in such amounts as to reach a final pH value in the range of 4.5-4.8, and it is held until it becomes coagulated. The coagulated mass may be cut; it may be warmed; it may be stirred; it is then drained. The curd is then washed with water, and further drained. It may be pressed, chilled, worked, and seasoned with salt.

(2) The dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (b)(1) of this section are sweet skim milk, concentrated skim milk, and nonfat dry milk. If concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk is used, water may be added in a quantity not in excess of that removed when the skim milk was concentrated or dried.

(3) For the purposes of this section the term "skim milk" means the milk of cows from which the milk fat has been separated, and "concentrated skim milk" means skim milk from which a portion of the water has been removed by evaporation.

(c) The name of the food consists of the following two phrases which shall appear together:

(1) The words "cottage cheese dry curd" or alternatively "dry curd cottage cheese" which shall all appear in type of the same size and style.

(2) The words "less than 1/2% milkfat" which shall all appear in letters not less than one-half of the height of the letters in the phrase specified in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, but in no case less than one-eighth of an inch in height.

(d) When either of the optional processes described in paragraph (b)(1) (ii) or (iii) of this section is used to make cottage cheese dry curd, the label shall bear the statement "Directly set" or "Curd set by direct acidification". Wherever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be seen under customary conditions of purchase, the statement specified in this paragraph, showing the optional process used, shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter.

(e) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that milk-clotting enzymes may be declared by the word "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 47 FR 11826, Mar. 19, 1982; 49 FR 10093, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.133 Cream cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 33 percent by weight of the finished food, and the maximum moisture content is 55 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used are pasteurized.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be homogenized and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to coagulate the dairy ingredients. The coagulated mass may be warmed and stirred and it is drained. The moisture content may be adjusted with one or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section. The curd may be pressed, chilled, and worked and it may be heated until it becomes fluid. It may then be homogenized or otherwise mixed. One or more of the optional dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) and the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Salt.

(ii) Cheese whey, concentrated cheese whey, dried cheese whey, or reconstituted cheese whey prepared by addition of water to concentrated cheese whey or dried cheese whey.

(iii) Stabilizers, in a total amount not to exceed 0.5 percent of the weight of the finished food, with or without the addition of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate in a maximum amount of 0.5 percent of the weight of the stabilizer(s) used.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "cream cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial original may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32053, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2892, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.134 Cream cheese with other foods.

(a) Description. Cream cheese with other foods is the class of foods prepared by mixing, with or without the aid of heat, cream cheese with one or a mixture of two or more types of foods (except other cheeses) listed in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, in an amount sufficient to differentiate the mixture from cream cheese. One or more of the other optional ingredients in paragraph (b)(2) of this section may be used. The maximum moisture content of the mixture is 60 percent by weight. The minimum milkfat is 33 percent by weight of the cream cheese and in no case less than 27 percent of the finished food. The moisture and fat contents will be determined by the methods described in 133.5, except that the method for determination of fat content is not applicable when the added food contains fat.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable optional ingredients may be used:

(1) Foods. Properly prepared fresh, cooked, canned, or dried fruits or vegetables; cooked or canned meats, relishes, pickles, or other suitable foods.

(2) Other optional ingredients. (i) Stabilizers, in a total amount not to exceed 0.8 percent, with or without the addition of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate in a maximum amount of 0.5 percent of the weight of the stabilizer(s) used.

(ii) Coloring.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "cream cheese with ___" or, alternatively, "cream cheese and ___", the blank being filled in with the name of the foods used in order of predominance by weight.

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32053, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.136 Washed curd and soaked curd cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Washed curd, soaked curd cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 42 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of washed curd cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed, treated with hydrogen peroxide/catalase, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. The whey is drained off, and the curd is matted into a cohesive mass. The mass is cut into slabs, which are so piled and handled as to promote the drainage of whey and the development of acidity. The slabs are then cut into pieces, cooled in water, and soaked therein until the whey is partly extracted and water is absorbed. The curd is drained, salted, stirred, and pressed into forms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Hydrogen peroxide, followed by a sufficient quantity of catalase preparation to eliminate the hydrogen peroxide. The weight of the hydrogen peroxide shall not exceed 0.05 percent of the weight of the dairy ingredients and the weight of the catalase shall not exeed 20 parts per million of the weight of dairy ingredients treated.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "washed curd cheese" or, alternatively, "soaked curd cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32054, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by 133.136, except that the dairy ingredients are not pasteurized and curing is not required.

[54 FR 32054, Aug. 4, 1989]

Sec. 133.138 Edam cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Edam cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 40 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 45 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasturized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of edam cheese is not more than 3 micrograms, as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. After coagulation the mass is cut into small cube-shaped pieces with sides approximately three-eighths-inch long. The mass is stirred and heated to about 90 deg. F. and so handled by further stirring, heating, dilution with water or salt brine, and salting as to promote and regulate the separation of curd and whey. When the desired curd is obtained, it is transferred to forms permitting drainage of whey. During drainage the curd is pressed and turned. After drainage the curd is removed from the forms and is salted and cured. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedures.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "edam cheese."

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat," as appropriate.

[48 FR 2743, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 55 FR 6795, Feb. 27, 1990; 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.140 Gammelost cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Gammelost cheese is the food prepared from nonfat milk, as defined in 133.3, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The maximum moisture content is 52 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5.

(2) The dairy ingredients are subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. The development of acidity is continued until the dairy ingredients coagulate to a semisolid mass. The mass is stirred and heated until a temperature of about 145 deg. F is reached, and is held at that temperature for at least 30 minutes. The whey is drained off and the curd removed and placed in forms and pressed. The shaped curd is placed in whey and heated for 3 or 4 hours, and may again be pressed. It is then stored under conditions suitable for curing.

(b) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "gammelost cheese".

(c) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[54 FR 32054, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.141 Gorgonzola cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Gorgonzola cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It is characterized by the presence of bluish-green mold, Penicillium roquefortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 42 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Gorgonzola cheese is at least 90 days old.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into smaller portions and allowed to stand for a time. The mixed curd and whey is placed into forms permitting further drainage. While being placed in forms, spores of the mold Penicillium roquefortii are added. The forms are turned several times during drainage. When sufficiently drained, the shaped curd is removed from the forms and salted with dry salt or brine. Perforations are then made in the shaped curd and it is held at a temperature of approximately 50 deg. F at 90 to 95 percent relative humidity, until the characteristic mold growth has developed. During storage, the surface of the cheese may be scraped to remove surface growth of undesirable microorganisms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, or corresponding products of goat origin, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Blue or green color in an amount to neutralize the natural yellow color of the curd.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Benzoyl peroxide, or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate used to bleach the dairy ingredients. The weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the dairy ingredients being bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If the dairy ingredients are bleached in this manner, vitamin A is added to the curd in such quantity as to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(vi) Vegetable fats or oil which may be hydrogenated, used as a coating for the rind.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "gorgonzola cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate; "milkfat from goat's milk and nonfat goat's milk", etc.

[54 FR 32054, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.142 Gouda cheese.

Gouda cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and complies with the requirements for label declaration of ingredients prescribed for edam cheese by 133.138, except that the minimum milkfat content is 46 percent by weight of the solids, as determined by the methods described in 133.5 and the maximum moisture content is 45 percent by weight.

[48 FR 2744, Jan. 21, 1983]

Sec. 133.144 Granular and stirred curd cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Granular cheese, stirred curd cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 39 percent by weight as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of granular cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed, treated with hydrogen peroxide/catalase, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. A part of the whey is drained off. The curd is then alternately stirred and drained to prevent matting and to remove whey from curd. The curd is then salted, stirred, drained, and pressed into forms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Hydrogen peroxide, followed by a sufficient quantity of catalase preparation to eliminate the hydrogen peroxide. The weight of the hydrogen peroxide shall not exceed 0.05 percent of the weight of the dairy ingredients and the weight of the catalase shall not exceed 20 parts per million of the weight of the dairy ingredients treated.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "granular cheese" or, alternatively, "stirred curd cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32055, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing.

Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by 133.144, except that the dairy ingredients are not pasteurized and curing is not required.

[54 FR 32056, Aug. 4, 1989]

Sec. 133.146 Grated cheeses.

(a) Description. Grated cheeses is the class of foods prepared by grinding, grating, shredding, or otherwise comminuting cheese of one variety or a mixture of two or more varieties. The cheese varieties that may be used are those for which there are definitions and standards of identity, except that cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, creamed cottage cheese, cook cheese, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing may not be used. All cheese ingredients used are either made from pasteurized milk or held at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days. Moisture may be removed from the cheese ingredients in the manufacture of the finished food, but no moisture is added. One or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (c) of this section may be used.

(b) Composition. (1) Each cheese ingredient used is present at a minimum level of 2 percent of the weight of the finished food.

(2) When one variety of cheese is used, the minimum milkfat content of the food is not more than 1 percent lower than the minimum prescribed by the standard of identity for that cheese.

(3) When two or more varieties of cheese are used, the minimum milkfat content is not more than 1 percent below the arithmetical average of the minimum fat content percentages prescribed by the standards of identity for the varieties of cheese used, and in no case is the milkfat content less than 31 percent.

(4) Milkfat and moisture contents are determined by the methods described in 133.5.

(c) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Antimycotics.

(2) Anticaking agents.

(3) Spices.

(4) Flavorings other than those which, singly or in combination with other ingredients, simulate the flavor of cheese of any age or variety.

(d) Nomenclature. (1) The name of the food is "grated cheese" or "grated cheeses", as appropriate. The name of the food shall be accompanied by a declaration of the specific variety of cheese(s) used in the food and by a declaration indicating the presence of any added spice or flavoring.

(2) Any cheese varietal names used in the name of the food are those specified by applicable standards of identity, except that the designation "American cheese" may be used for cheddar, washed curd, colby, or granular cheese or for any mixture of these cheeses.

(3) The following terms may be used in place of the name of the food to describe specific types of grated cheese:

(i) If only one variety of cheese is used, the name of the food is "grated ___ cheese", the name of the cheese filling the blank.

(ii) If only parmesan and romano cheeses are used and each is present at a level of not less than 25 percent by weight of the finished food, the name of the food is "grated ___ and ___ cheese", the blanks being filled with the names "parmesan" and "romano" in order of predominance by weight. The name "reggiano" may be used for "parmesan".

(iii) If a mixture of cheese varieties (not including parmesan or romano) is used and each variety is present at a level of not less than 25 percent of the weight of the finished food, the name of the food is "grated ___ cheese", the blank being filled in with the names of the varieties in order of predominance by weight.

(iv) If a mixture of cheese varieties in which one or more varieties (not including parmesan or romano) are each present at a level of not less than 25 percent by weight of the finished food, and one or more other varieties (which may include parmesan and romano cheese) are each present at a level of not less than 2 percent but in the aggregate not more than 10 percent of the weight of the finished food, the name of the food is "grated ___ cheese with other grated cheese" or "grated ___ cheese with other grated cheeses", as appropriate, the blank being filled in with the name or names of those cheese varieties present at levels of not less than 25 percent by weight of the finished food in order of predominance, in letters not more than twice as high as the letters in the phrase "with other grated cheese(s)".

(4) The following terms may be used in place of "grated" to describe alternative forms of cheese:

(i) "Shredded", if the particles of cheese are in the form of cylinders, shreds, or strings.

(ii) "Chipped" or "chopped", if the particles of cheese are in the form of chips.

(e) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", "milkfat from goat's milk and nonfat goat's milk", "milkfat from sheep's milk and nonfat sheep's milk", etc., as appropriate.

[54 FR 32056, Aug. 4, 1989; 54 FR 35756, Aug. 29, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.147 Grated American cheese food.

(a)(1) Grated American cheese food is the food prepared by mixing, with or without the aid of heat, one or more of the optional cheese ingredients prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section with one or more of the optional ingredients prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section, into a uniformly blended, partially dehydrated, powdered, or granular mixture.

(2) Grated American cheese food contains not less than 23 percent of milkfat, as determined by the method prescribed in 133.5(b).

(b) The optional cheese ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese.

(c) The other optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1) Nonfat dry milk.

(2) Dried whey.

(3) An emulsifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the emulsifying ingredients named in 133.173(e)(1), in such quantity that the weight of the solids thereof is not more than 3 percent of the weight of the grated American cheese food.

(4) An acidifying agent consisting of one or more of the acid-reacting ingredients named in 133.173(e)(2).

(5) Salt.

(6) Artificial coloring.

(d) The name of the food is "Grated American cheese food". The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (e) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(e) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these may be designated "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10094, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.148 Hard grating cheeses.

(a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are hard grating cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from milk and the other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. They contain not more than 34 percent of moisture, and their solids contain not less than 32 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). Hard grating cheeses are cured for not less than 6 months.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria or other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. The mass is cut into small particles, stirred, and heated. The curd is separated from the whey, drained, shaped into forms, pressed, salted, and cured. The rind may be colored or rubbed with vegetable oil or both. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of hard grating cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) For the purposes of this section, the word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any such concentrated or dried products used.

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(e) The name of each hard grating cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Hard grating cheese", preceded or followed by:

(1) The specific common or usual name of such hard grating cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized therefor; or

(2) If no such specific common or usual name has become generally recognized therefor, an arbitrary or fanciful name that is not false or misleading in any particular.

(3) When milk other than cow's milk is used, in whole or in part, the statement "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milk used, in order of predominance by weight.

(f) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) When milk other than cow's milk is used, in whole or in part, the common or usual name of each such milk ingredient shall be declared in order of predominance by weight; and

(2) Enzymes of the animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49013, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10094, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.149 Gruyere cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Gruyere cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It contains small holes or eyes. It has a mild flavor, due in part to the growth of surface-curing agents. The minimum milkfat content is 45 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 39 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. The cheese is at least 90 days old.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of gruyere cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing and propionic acid-producing bacterial cultures. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into particles similar in size to wheat kernels. For about 30 minutes the particles are alternately stirred and allowed to settle. The temperature is raised to about 126 deg. F. Stirring is continued until the curd becomes firm. The curd is transferred to hoops or forms, and pressed until the desired shape and firmness are obtained. The cheese is surface-salted while held at a temperature of 48deg. to 54 deg. F for a few days. It is soaked for 1 day in a saturated salt solution. It is then held for 3 weeks in a salting cellar and wiped every 2 days with brine cloth to insure growth of biological curing agents on the rind. It is then removed to a heating room and held at progressively higher temperatures, finally reaching 65 deg. F with a relative humidity of 85 to 90 percent, for several weeks, during which time small holes, or so-called eyes, form. The cheese is then stored at a lower temperature for further curing. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(ii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iii) Antimycotic agents, applied to the surface of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "gruyere cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2744, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.150 Hard cheeses.

(a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are hard cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from milk and the other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. They contain not more than 39 percent of moisture, and their solids contain not less than 50 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). If the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, with or without other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into small particles, stirred, and heated. The curd is separated from the whey, drained, and shaped into forms, and may be pressed. The curd is salted at some stage of the manufacturing process. The shaped curd may be cured. The rind may be coated with paraffin or rubbed with vegetable oil. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of hard cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used. Harmless flavor-producing microorganisms may be added, and curing may be conducted under suitable conditions for the development of biological curing agents.

(c) For the purposes of this section:

(1) The word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom, or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Milk shall be deemed to have been pasteurized if it has been held at a temperature of not less than 143 deg. F for a period of not less than 30 minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A hard cheese shall be deemed not to have been made from pasteurized milk if 0.25 gram shows a phenol equivalent of more than 3 micrograms when tested by the method prescribed in 133.5(c).

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(e) The name of each hard cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Hard cheese", preceded or followed by:

(1) The specific common or unusual name of such hard cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized therefor; or

(2) If no such specific common or usual name has become generally recognized, therefor, an arbitrary or fanciful name that is not false or misleading in any particular.

(3) When milk other than cow's milk is used, in whole or in part, the statement "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milk used, in order of predominance by weight.

(f) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) When milk other than cow's milk is used, in whole or in part, the common or usual name of each such milk ingredient shall be declared in order of predominance by weight; and

(2) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49013, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10094, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.152 Limburger cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Limburger cheese is the food prepared by one of the procedures set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 50 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of limburger cheese is not more than 4 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One of the following procedures may be followed for producing limburger cheese:

(i) One or more of the dairy ingredients, unpasteurized, specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is warmed to about 92 deg. F and subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into cubes with sides approximately one-half inch long. After a few minutes the mass is stirred and heated, gradually raising the temperature to 96deg. to 98 deg. F. The curd is then allowed to settle, most of the whey is drained off, and the remaining curd and whey dipped into molds. During drainage the curd may be pressed. It is turned at regular intervals. After drainage the curd is cut into pieces of desired size and dry-salted at intervals for 24 to 48 hours. The cheese is then cured with frequent applications of a weak brine solution to the surface, until the proper growth of surface-curing organisms is obtained. It is then wrapped and held in storage for development of as much additional flavor as is desired. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(ii) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is pasteurized, brought to a temperature of 89deg. to 90 deg. F. after pasteurization, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. The procedure is then the same as in paragraph (a)(3)(i) of this section, except that heating is to 94 deg. F. After most of the whey is drained off, salt brine at a temperature of 66deg. to 70 deg. F is added, so that the pH of the curd is about 4.8. The mixed curd, whey, and brine is dipped into molds, and the remaining procedure specified in paragraph (a)(3)(i) of this section is followed.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "limburger cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2744, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.153 Monterey cheese and monterey jack cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Monterey cheese, monterey jack cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids, and the maximum moisture content is 44 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used are pasteurized.

(2) The phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of monterey cheese is not more than 3 micrograms, as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. Part of the whey is drained off, and water or salt brine may be added. The curd is drained and placed in a muslin or sheeting cloth, formed into a ball, and pressed; or the curd is placed in a cheese hoop and pressed. Later, the cloth bandage is removed, and the cheese may be covered with a suitable coating. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(ii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iii) Salt.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Vegetable oil, with or without rice flour sprinkled on the surface, used as a coating for the rind.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "monterey cheese" or alternatively, "monterey jack cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes", and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32056, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.154 High-moisture jack cheese.

High-moisture jack cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity and is subject to the requirement for label statement of ingredients prescribed for monterey cheese by 133.153, except that its moisture content is more than 44 percent but less than 50 percent.

[58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.155 Mozzarella cheese and scamorza cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Mozzarella cheese, scamorza cheese is the food prepared from dairy ingredients and other ingredients specified in this section by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It may be molded into various shapes. The minimum milkfat content is 45 percent by weight of the solids, and the moisture content is more than 52 percent but not more than 60 percent by weight as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients are pasteurized.

(2) The phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of mozzarella cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is warmed to approximately 88 deg. F (31.1 deg. C) and subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, and it may be stirred to facilitate separation of whey from the curd. The whey is drained, and the curd may be washed with cold water and the water drained off. The curd may be collected in bundles for further drainage and for ripening. The curd may be iced, it may be held under refrigeration, and it may be permitted to warm to room temperature and ripen further. The curd may be cut. It is immersed in hot water or heated with steam and is kneaded and stretched until smooth and free of lumps. It is then cut and molded. The molded curd is firmed by immersion in cold water and drained. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Cow's milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, or the corresponding products of water buffalo origin, except that cow's milk products are not combined with water buffalo products.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Vinegar.

(ii) Coloring to mask any natural yellow color in the curd.

(iii) Salt.

(iv) Antimycotics, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the cheese during the kneading and stretching process and/or applied to the surface of the cheese.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "mozzarella cheese" or, alternatively, "scamorza cheese". When the food is made with water buffalo milk, the name of the food is accompanied by the phrase "made with water buffalo milk".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", "milkfat from water buffalo milk and nonfat buffalo milk" or "nonfat water buffalo milk and milkfat from water buffalo milk," as appropriate.

[53 FR 3743, Feb. 9, 1988, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.156 Low-moisture mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Low-moisture mozzarella cheese, low-moisture scamorza cheese is the food prepared from dairy ingredients and other ingredients specified in this section by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It may be molded into various shapes. The minimum milkfat content is 45 percent by weight of the solids and the moisture content is more than 45 percent but not more than 52 percent by weight as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients are pasteurized.

(2) The phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of low-moisture mozzarella cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this action is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, stirred, and allowed to stand. It may be reheated and again stirred. The whey is drained and the curd may be cut and piled to promote further separation of whey. It may be washed with cold water and the water drained off. The curd may be collected in bundles for further drainage and for ripening. The curd may be iced, it may be held under refrigeration, and it may be permitted to warm to room temperature and ripen further. The curd may be cut. It is immersed in hot water or heated with steam and is kneaded and stretched until smooth and free of lumps. It is then cut and molded. In molding, the curd is kept sufficiently warm to cause proper sealing of the surface. The molded curd is firmed by immersion in cold water and drained. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Cow's milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, or the corresponding products of water buffalo origin, except that cow's milk products are not combined with water buffalo products.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Vinegar.

(ii) Coloring to mask any natural yellow color in the curd.

(iii) Salt.

(iv) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(v) Antimycotics, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practices, may be added to the cheese during the kneading and stretching process and/or applied to the surface of the cheese.

(c) Nomenclature. The names of the food is "low-moisture mozzarella cheese" or, alternatively, "low-moisture scamorza cheese". When the food is made with water buffalo milk, the name of the food is accompanied by the phrase "made with water buffalo milk".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", "milkfat from water buffalo milk and nonfat water buffalo milk" or "nonfat water buffalo) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", "milkfat from water buffalo milk and nonfat water buffalo milk" or "nonfat water buffalo milk and milkfat from water buffalo milk", as appropriate.

[53 FR 3743, Feb. 9, 1988, as amended at 58 FR 2893, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.157 Part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

Part-skim mozzarella cheese, part-skim scamorza cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity as prescribed for mozzarella cheese by 133.155, except that its milk fat content, calculated on the solids basis, is less than 45 percent but not less than 30 percent.

Sec. 133.158 Low-moisture part-skim mozzarella and scamorza cheese.

Low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese and low-moisture part-skim scamorza cheese conform to the definition and standard of identity and comply with the requirements for label declaration of ingredients prescribed for low-moisture mozzarella cheese and low-moisture scamorza cheese by 133.156, except that their milkfat content, calculated on the solids basis, is less than 45 percent but not less than 30 percent.

[58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.160 Muenster and munster cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Muenster cheese, munster cheese, is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 46 percent by weight, as determined by the methods decribed in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used are pasteurized.

(2) The phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of muenster cheese is not more than 3 micrograms, as determined by the methods described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a harmless lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. After coagulation the mass is divided into small portions, stirred, and heated, with or without dilution with water or salt brine, so as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. The curd is transferred to forms permitting drainage of the whey. During drainage the curd may be pressed and turned. After drainage the curd is removed from the forms and is salted. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Vegetable oil, used as a coating for the rind.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "muenster cheese" or, alternatively, "munster cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32057, Aug. 4, 1989; 54 FR 35756, Aug. 29, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.161 Muenster and munster cheese for manufacturing.

Muenster cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity for muenster cheese prescribed by 133.160, except that the dairy ingredients are not pasteurized.

[54 FR 32057, Aug. 4, 1989]

Sec. 133.162 Neufchatel cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Neufchatel cheese is the soft uncured cheese prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The milkfat content is not less than 20 percent but less than 33 percent by weight of the finished food and the maximum moisture content is 65 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used are pasteurized.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is subjected to the action of a harmless lactic acid-producing bacterial culture, with or without one or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. The mixture is held until the dairy ingredients coagulate. The coagulated mass may be warmed and stirred and it is drained. The moisture content may be adjusted with one of the optional ingredients in paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section. The curd may be pressed, chilled, worked, and heated until it becomes fluid. It may then be homogenized or otherwise mixed. One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section or the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Salt.

(ii) Cheese whey, concentrated cheese whey, dried cheese whey, or reconstituted cheese whey prepared by addition of water to concentrated cheese whey or dried cheese whey.

(iii) Stabilizers, in a total amount not to exceed 0.5 percent of the weight of the finished food, with or without the addition of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate in a maximum amount of 0.5 percent of the weight of the stabilizer(s) used.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "neufchatel cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32057, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.164 Nuworld cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Nuworld cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It is characterized by the presence of creamy-white mold, a white mutant of Penicillium roquefortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 46 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Nuworld cheese is at least 60 days old.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into smaller portions and allowed to stand for a time. The mixed curd and whey is placed into forms permitting further drainage. While being placed in forms, spores of a white mutant of the mold Penicillium roquefortii are added. The forms are turned several times during drainage. When sufficiently drained, the shaped curd is removed from the forms and salted with dry salt or brine. Perforations are then made in the shaped curd and it is held at a temperature of approximately 50 deg. F at 90 to 95 percent relative humidity, until the characteristic mold growth has developed. During storage, the surface of the cheese may be scraped to remove surface growth of undesirable microorganisms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Blue or green color in an amount to neutralize the natural yellow color of the curd.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "nuworld cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32058, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.165 Parmesan and reggiano cheese.

(a) Parmesan cheese, reggiano cheese, is the food prepared from milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It is characterized by a granular texture and a hard and brittle rind. It grates readily. It contains not more than 32 percent of moisture, and its solids contain not less than 32 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). It is cured for not less than 10 months.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, or both, with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the milk, is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. The mass is cut into pieces no larger than wheat kernels, heated, and stirred until the temperature reaches between 115 deg. F and 125 deg. F. The curd is allowed to settle and is then removed from the kettle or vat, drained for a short time, placed in hoops, and pressed. The pressed curd is removed and salted in brine, or dry-salted. The cheese is cured in a cool, ventilated room. The rind of the cheese may be coated or colored. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of parmesan cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c)(1) For the purposes of this section, the word "milk" means cow's milk, which may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or by adding thereto one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk, water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk used.

(2) Such milk may be bleached by the use of benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, sufficient vitamin A is added to the curd to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(e) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49014, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.167 Pasteurized blended cheese.

Pasteurized blended cheese conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized process cheese by 133.169, except that:

(a) In mixtures of two or more cheeses, cream cheese or neufchatel cheese may be used.

(b) None of the ingredients prescribed or permitted for pasteurized process cheese by 133.169 (c) and (d)(1) is used.

(c) In case of mixtures of two or more cheeses containing cream cheese or neufchatel cheese, the moisture content is not more than the arithmetical average of the maximum moisture contents prescribed by the definitions and standards of identity for the varieties of cheeses blended, for which such limits have been prescribed.

(d) The word "process" is replaced by the word "blended" in the name prescribed by 133.169(e).

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.168 Pasteurized blended cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Pasteurized blended cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized blended cheese by 133.167, except that:

(1) Its moisture content may be 1 percent more, and the milk fat content of its solids may be 1 percent less, than the limits prescribed by 133.167 for moisture and milk fat in the corresponding pasteurized blended cheese.

(2) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a pasteurized blended cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats is the name prescribed by 133.167 for the applicable pasteurized blended cheese, followed by the term "with ___", the blank being filled in with the common or usual name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1977; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.169 Pasteurized process cheese.

(a)(1) Pasteurized process cheese is the food prepared by comminuting and mixing, with the aid of heat, one or more cheeses of the same or two or more varieties, except cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, lowfat cottage cheese, cottage cheese dry curd, cook cheese, hard grating cheese, semisoft part-skim cheese, part-skim spiced cheese, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing with an emulsifying agent prescribed by paragraph (c) of this section into a homogeneous plastic mass. One or more of the optional ingredients designated in paragraph (d) of this section may be used.

(2) During its preparation, pasteurized process cheese is heated for not less than 30 seconds at a temperature of not less than 150 deg. F. When tested for phosphatase by the method prescribed in 133.5(c), the phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of pasteurized process cheese is not more than 3 micrograms.

(3)(i) The moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese made from a single variety of cheese is not more than 1 percent greater than the maximum moisture content prescribed by the definition and standard of identity, if any there be, for the variety of cheese used; but in no case is more than 43 percent, except that the moisture content of pasteurized process washed curd cheese or pasteurized process colby cheese is not more than 40 percent; the moisture content of pasteurized process swiss cheese or pasteurized process gruyere cheese is not more than 44 percent; and the moisture content of pasteurized process limburger cheese is not more than 51 percent.

(ii) The fat content of the solids of a pasteurized process cheese made from a single variety of cheese is not less than the minimum prescribed by the definition and standard of identity, if any there be, for the variety of cheese used, but in no case is less than 47 percent; except that the fat content of the solids of pasteurized process swiss cheese is not less than 43 percent, and the fat content of the solids of pasteurized process gruyere cheese is not less than 45 percent.

(4)(i) The moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese made from two or more varieties of cheese is not more than 1 percent greater than the arithmetical average of the maximum moisture contents prescribed by the definitions and standards of identity, if any there be, for the varieties of cheese used; but in no case is the moisture content more than 43 percent, except that the moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese made from two or more of the varieties cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese is not more than 40 percent, and the moisture content of a mixture of swiss cheese and gruyere cheese is not more than 44 percent.

(ii) The fat content of the solids of a pasteurized process cheese made from two or more varieties of cheese is not less than the arithmetical average of the minimum fat contents prescribed by the definitions and standards of identity, if any there be, for the varieties of cheese used, but in no case is less than 47 percent, except that the fat content of the solids of a pasteurized process gruyere cheese made from a mixture of swiss cheese and gruyere cheese is not less than 45 percent.

(5) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a), (b), and (d).

(6) The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese made from two varieties of cheese is not less than 25 percent of the total weight of both, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, or gorgonzola cheese is not less than 10 percent of the total weight of both, and the weight of limburger cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of both. The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese made from three or more varieties of cheese is not less than 15 percent of the total weight of all, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, or gorgonzola cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of all, and the weight of limburger cheese is not less than 3 percent of the total weight of all. These limits do not apply to the quantity of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese and granular cheese in mixtures which are designated as "American cheese" as prescribed in paragraph (e)(2)(ii) of this section. Such mixtures are considered as one variety of cheese for the purposes of this paragraph (a)(6).

(7) For the purposes of this section, cheddar cheese for manufacturing, washed curd cheese for manufacturing, colby cheese for manufacturing, granular cheese for manufacturing, brick cheese for manufacturing, muenster cheese for manufacturing, and swiss cheese for manufacturing are considered as cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, brick cheese, muenster cheese, and swiss cheese, respectively.

(b) Pasteurized process cheese may be smoked, or the cheese or cheeses from which it is made may be smoked, before comminuting and mixing, or it may contain substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke.

(c) The emulsifying agent referred to in paragraph (a) of this section is one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Monosodium phosphate, disodium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate, trisodium phosphate, sodium metaphosphate (sodium hexametaphosphate), sodium acid pyrophosphate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, sodium citrate, potassium citrate, calcium citrate, sodium tartrate, and sodium potassium tartrate, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such emulsifying agent is not more than 3 percent of the weight of the pasteurized process cheese.

(d) The optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1) An acidifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, lactic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, and phosphoric acid, in such quantity that the pH of the pasteurized process cheese is not below 5.3.

(2) Cream, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, or any combination of two or more of these, in such quantity that the weight of the fat derived therefrom is less than 5 percent of the weight of the pasteurized process cheese.

(3) Water.

(4) Salt.

(5) Harmless artificial coloring.

(6) Spices or flavorings, other than any which singly or in combination with other ingredients simulate the flavor of a cheese of any age or variety.

(7) Pasteurized process cheese in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of not more than 0.2 percent by weight of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, or consisting of not more than 0.3 percent by weight of sodium propionate, calcium propionate, or a combination of sodium propionate and calcium propionate.

(8) Pasteurized process cheese in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain lecithin as an optional anti-sticking agent in an amount not to exceed 0.03 percent by weight of the finished product.

(9) Safe and suitable enzyme modified cheese.

(e) The name of a pasteurized process cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is as follows:

(1) In case it is made from a single variety of cheese, its name is "Pasteurized process ___ cheese", the blank being filled in with the name of the variety of cheese used.

(2) In case it is made from two or more varieties of cheese, its name is "Pasteurized process ___ and ___ cheese", or "Pasteurized process ___ blended with ___ cheese", or "Pasteurized process blend of ___ and ___ cheese", the blanks being filled in with the names of the varieties of cheeses used, in order of predominance by weight; except that:

(i) In case it is made from gruyere cheese and swiss cheese, and the weight of gruyere cheese is not less than 25 percent of the weight of both, it may be designated "Pasteurized process gruyere cheese"; and

(ii) In case it is made of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, or granular cheese or any mixture of two or more of these, it may be designated "Pasteurized process American cheese"; or when cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these is combined with other varieties of cheese in the cheese ingredient, any of such cheeses or such mixture may be designated as "American cheese".

The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (g) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(f) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, including smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke, that characterizes the product as specified in 101.22 of this chapter and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.

(g) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these may be designated as "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.170 Pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Unless a definition and standard of identity specifically applicable is established by another section of this part, a pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is a food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized process cheese by 133.169, except that:

(1) Its moisture content may be 1 percent more, and the milk fat content of its solids may be 1 percent less than the limits prescribed by 133.169 for moisture and fat in the corresponding pasteurized process cheese.

(2) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats is the name prescribed by 133.169 for the applicable pasteurized process cheese, followed by the term "with ___", the blank being filled in with the common or usual name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.171 Pasteurized process pimento cheese.

Pasteurized process pimento cheese is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity for pasteurized process cheese with fruits, vegetables, or meats, and is subject to the requirement for label statement of ingredients, except that:

(a) Its moisture content is not more than 41 percent, and the fat content of its solids is not less than 49 percent.

(b) The cheese ingredient is cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese or any mixture of two or more of these in any proportion.

(c) For the purposes of this section, cheddar cheese for manufacturing, washed curd cheese for manufacturing, colby cheese for manufacturing, and granular cheese for manufacturing shall be considered as cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese, respectively.

(d) The only fruit, vegetable, or meat ingredient is pimentos in such quantity that the weight of the solids thereof is not less than 0.2 percent of the weight of the finished pasteurized process pimento cheese.

(e) The optional ingredients designated in 133.169(b) and (d)(6) are not used.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.173 Pasteurized process cheese food.

(a)(1) A pasteurized process cheese food is the food prepared by comminuting and mixing, with the aid of heat, one or more of the optional cheese ingredients prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section, with one or more of the optional dairy ingredients prescribed in paragraph (d) of this section, into a homogeneous plastic mass. One or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (e) of this section may be used.

(2) During its preparation, a pasteurized process cheese food is heated for not less than 30 seconds, at a temperature of not less than 150 deg. F. When tested for phosphatase by the method prescribed in 133.5(c), the phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of pasteurized process cheese food is not more than 3 micrograms.

(3) The moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese food is not more than 44 percent, and the fat content is not less than 23 percent.

(4) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a) and (b), except that in determining moisture the loss in weight which occurs in drying for 5 hours, under the conditions prescribed in such method, is taken as the weight of the moisture.

(5) The weight of the cheese ingredient prescribed by paragraph (a)(1) of this section constitutes not less than 51 percent of the weight of the finished pasteurized process cheese food.

(6) The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese food made with two varieties of cheese is not less than 25 percent of the total weight of both, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 10 percent of the total weight of both. The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese food made with three or more varieties of cheese is not less than 15 percent of the total weight of all, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of all. These limits do not apply to the quantity of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese in mixtures which are designated as "American cheese" as prescribed in paragraph (h)(5) of this section. Such mixtures are considered as one variety of cheese for the purposes of this subparagraph.

(7) For the purposes of this section, cheddar cheese for manufacturing, washed curd cheese for manufacturing, colby cheese for manufacturing, granular cheese for manufacturing, brick cheese for manufacturing, muenster cheese for manufacturing, and swiss cheese for manufacturing are considered as cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, brick cheese, muenster cheese, and swiss cheese, respectively.

(b) Pasteurized process cheese food may be smoked, or the cheese or cheeses from which it is made may be smoked, before comminuting and mixing, or it may contain substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke.

(c) The optional cheese ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are one or more cheeses of the same or two or more varieties, except cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, creamed cottage cheese, cook cheese, and skim-milk cheese for manufacturing, and except that hard grating cheese, semisoft part skim cheese, and part-skim spiced cheese are not used alone or in combination with each other as the cheese ingredient.

(d) The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey, any of the foregoing from which part of the water has been removed, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, albumin from cheese whey, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

(e) The other optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1) An emulsifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Monosodium phosphate, disodium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate, trisodium phosphate, sodium metaphosphate (sodium hexametaphosphate), sodium acid pyrophosphate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, sodium citrate, potassium citrate, calcium citrate, sodium tartrate, and sodium potassium tartrate, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such emulsifying agent is not more than 3 percent of the weight of the pasteurized process cheese food.

(2) An acidifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, lactic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, and phosphoric acid in such quantity that the pH of the pasteurized process cheese food is not below 5.0.

(3) Water.

(4) Salt.

(5) Harmless artificial coloring.

(6) Spices or flavorings other than any which singly or in combination with other ingredients simulate the flavor of cheese of any age or variety.

(7) Pasteurized process cheese food in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of not more than 0.2 percent by weight of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, or consisting of not more than 0.3 percent by weight of sodium propionate, calcium propionate, or a combination of sodium propionate and calcium propionate.

(8) Pasteurized process cheese food in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain lecithin as an optional anti-sticking agent in an amount not to exceed 0.03 percent by weight of the finished product.

(9) Safe and suitable enzyme modified cheese.

(f) The name of the food is "Pasteurized process cheese food". The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (h) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(g) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, including smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke, that characterizes the product as specified in 101.22 of this chapter and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.

(h) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these may be designated as "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.174 Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized process cheese food by 133.173, except that:

(1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent.

(2) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats is "Pasteurized process cheese food with ___", the blank being filled in with the common or usual name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

(c) If the only vegetable ingredient is pimento, and no meat or fruit ingredient is used, the weight of the solids of such pimentos is not less than 0.2 percent of the weight of the finished food. The name of this food is "Pimento pasteurized process cheese food" or "Pasteurized process pimento cheese food".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread.

Pasteurized cheese spread is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized process cheese spread by 133.179, except that no emulsifying agent as prescribed by 133.179(e) is used.

[58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.176 Pasteurized cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Pasteurized cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is a food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized cheese spread by 133.175, except that:

(1) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(2) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a pasteurized cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats is "Pasteurized cheese spread with ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.178 Pasteurized neufchatel cheese spread with other foods.

(a)(1) Pasteurized neufchatel cheese spread with other foods is the class of foods each of which is prepared by mixing, with the aid of heat, neufchatel cheese with one or a mixture of two or more properly prepared foods (except other cheeses), such as fresh, cooked, canned, or dried fruits or vegetables; cooked or canned meats; relishes, pickles or other foods suitable for blending with neufchatel cheese. It may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the optional ingredients named in paragraph (b) of this section. The amount of the added food or foods must be sufficient to so differentiate the blend that it does not simulate neufchatel cheese. It is spreadable at 70 deg. F.

(2) During its preparation the mixture is heated for not less than 30 seconds at a temperature of not less than 150 deg. F. When tested for phosphatase by the method prescribed in 133.5(c), the phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of such food is not more than 3 micrograms.

(3)(i) No water other than that contained in the ingredients used is added to this food, but the moisture content in no case is more than 65 percent.

(ii) The milk fat is not less than 20 percent by weight of the finished food.

(b) The optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1)(i) One or any mixture of two or more of the following: Gum karaya, gum tragacanth, carob bean gum, gelatin, algin (sodium alginate), propylene glycol alginate, guar gum, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cellulose gum), carrageenan, oat gum, or xanthan gum. The total quantity of any such substances, including that contained in the neufchatel cheese, is not more than 0.8 percent by weight of the finished food.

(ii) When one or more of the optional ingredients in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section are used, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate complying with the requirements of 172.810 of this chapter may be used in a quantity not in excess of 0.5 percent by weight of such ingredients.

(2) Artificial coloring, unless such addition conceals damage or inferiority or makes the finished food appear better or of greater value than it is.

(3) An acidifying agent consisting of one or a mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, acetic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, phosphoric acid.

(4) A sweetening agent consisting of one or a mixture of two or more of the following: Sugar, dextrose, corn sirup, corn sirup solids, glucose sirup, glucose sirup solids, maltose, malt sirup, hydrolyzed lactose.

(5) Cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey, any of the foregoing from which part of the water has been removed, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, and albumin from cheese whey.

(c) The name of the food is "pasteurized Neufchatel cheese spread with ___" or "pasteurized Neufchatel cheese spread and ___", the blank being filled in with the common names of the foods added, in order of predominance by weight. The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (d) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(d) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2894, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.179 Pasteurized process cheese spread.

(a)(1) Pasteurized process cheese spread is the food prepared by comminuting and mixing, with the aid of heat, one or more of the optional cheese ingredients prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section, with or without one or more of the optional dairy ingredients prescribed in paragraph (d) of this section, with one or more of the emulsifying agents prescribed in paragraph (e) of this section, and with or without one or more of the optional ingredients prescribed by paragraph (f) of this section, into a homogeneous plastic mass, which is spreadable at 70 deg. F.

(2) During its preparation, a pasteurized process cheese spread is heated for not less than 30 seconds at a temperature of not less than 150 deg. F. When tested for phosphatase by the method prescribed in 133.5(c), the phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of pasteurized process cheese spread is not more than 3 micrograms.

(3) The moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese spread is more than 44 percent but not more than 60 percent, and the milk fat content is not less than 20 percent.

(4) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a) and (b), except that in determining moisture the loss in weight which occurs in drying for 5 hours, under the conditions prescribed in such method, is taken as the weight of the moisture.

(5) The weight of the cheese ingredient referred to in paragraph (a)(1) of this section constitutes not less than 51 percent of the weight of the pasteurized process cheese spread.

(6) The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese spread made with two varieties of cheese is not less than 25 percent of the total weight of both, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 10 percent of the total weight of both. The weight of each variety of cheese in a pasteurized process cheese spread made with three or more varieties of cheese is not less than 15 percent of the total weight of all, except that the weight of blue cheese, nuworld cheese, roquefort cheese, gorgonzola cheese, or limburger cheese is not less than 5 percent of the total weight of all. These limits do not apply to the quantity of cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese in mixtures which are designated as "American cheese" as prescribed in paragraph (i)(5) of this section. Such mixtures are considered as one variety of cheese for the purposes of this paragraph (a)(6).

(7) For the purposes of this section, cheddar cheese for manufacturing, washed curd cheese for manufacturing, colby cheese for manufacturing, granular cheese for manufacturing, brick cheese for manufacturing, muenster cheese for manufacturing, and swiss cheese for manufacturing are considered as cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, brick cheese, muenster cheese, and swiss cheese, respectively.

(b) Pasteurized process cheese spread may be smoked, or the cheese or cheeses from which it is made may be smoked, before comminuting and mixing, or it may contain substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke.

(c) The optional cheese ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are one or more cheeses of the same or two or more varieties, except that skim-milk cheese for manufacturing may not be used, and except that cream cheese, neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, creamed cottage cheese, cook cheese, hard grating cheese, semisoft part-skim cheese, and part-skim spiced cheese are not used, alone or in combination with each other, as the cheese ingredient.

(d) The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey, any of the foregoing from which part of the water has been removed, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, albumin from cheese whey, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

(e) The emulsifying agents prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section are one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Monosodium phosphate, disodium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate, trisodium phosphate, sodium metaphosphate (sodium hexametaphosphate), sodium acid pyrophosphate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, sodium citrate, potassium citrate, calcium citrate, sodium tartrate, and sodium potassium tartrate, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such emulsifying agent is not more than 3 percent of the weight of the pasteurized process cheese spread.

(f) The other optional ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are:

(1)(i) One or any mixture of two or more of the following: Carob bean gum, gum karaya, gum tragacanth, guar gum, gelatin, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cellulose gum), carrageenan, oat gum, algin (sodium alginate), propylene glycol alginate, or xanthan gum. The total weight of such substances is not more than 0.8 percent of the weight of the finished food.

(ii) When one or more of the optional ingredients in paragraph (f)(1)(i) of this section are used, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate complying with the requirements of 172.810 of this chapter may be used in a quantity not in excess of 0.5 percent by weight of such ingredients.

(2) An acidifying agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: A vinegar, lactic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, and phosphoric acid, in such quantity that the pH of the pasteurized process cheese spread is not below 4.0.

(3) A sweetening agent consisting of one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Sugar, dextrose, corn sugar, corn sirup, corn sirup solids, glucose sirup, glucose sirup solids, maltose, malt sirup, and hydrolyzed lactose, in a quantity necessary for seasoning.

(4) Water.

(5) Salt.

(6) Harmless artificial coloring.

(7) Spices or flavorings other than any which singly or in combination with other ingredients simulates the flavor of a cheese of any age or variety.

(8) Pasteurized process cheese spread in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.2 percent by weight, calculated as sorbic acid or consisting of not more than 0.3 percent by weight of sodium propionate, calcium propionate, or a combination of sodium propionate and calcium propionate.

(9) Pasteurized process cheese spread in consumer-sized packages may contain lecithin as an optional anti-sticking agent in an amount not to exceed 0.03 percent by weight of the finished product.

(10) Safe and suitable enzyme modified cheese.

(11) Nisin preparation in an amount which results in not more than 250 parts per million nisin in the food.

(g) The name of the food is "pasteurized process cheese spread". The full name of the food shall appear on the principal display panel of the label in type of uniform size, style, and color. Wherever any word or statement emphasizing the name of any ingredient appears on the label (other than in an ingredient statement as specified in paragraph (i) of this section) so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the full name of the food shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such word or statement in type of at least the same size as the type used in such word or statement.

(h) The name of the food shall include a declaration of any flavoring, including smoke and substances prepared by condensing or precipitating wood smoke, that characterizes the product as specified in 101.22 of this chapter and a declaration of any spice that characterizes the product.

(i) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese, colby cheese, granular cheese, or any mixture of two or more of these may be designated as "American cheese".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 54 FR 6121, Feb. 8, 1989; 54 FR 22741, May 26, 1989; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.180 Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

(a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats, or mixtures of these is a food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients, prescribed for pasteurized process cheese spread by 133.179, except that:

(1) It contains one or any mixture of two or more of the following: Any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried vegetable; any properly prepared cooked or canned meat.

(2) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by 133.5(b) is not applicable.

(b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats is "Pasteurized process cheese spread with ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the fruits, vegetables, or meats used, in order of predominance by weight.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.181 Provolone cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Provolone, a pasta filata or stretched curd-type cheese, is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other method which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It has a stringy texture. The minimum milkfat content is 45 percent by weight of the solids, as determined by the methods described in 133.5 and the maximum moisture content is 45 percent by weight. If the dairy ingredients used are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of provolone cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be bleached, warmed, and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut, stirred, and heated so as to promote and regulate the separation of whey from the curd. The whey is drained off, and the curd is matted and cut, immersed in hot water, and kneaded and stretched until it is smooth and free from lumps. Antimycotics may be added to the curd during the kneading and stretching process. Then it is cut and molded. During the molding the curd is kept sufficiently warm to cause proper sealing of the surface. The molded curd is then firmed by immersion in cold water, salted in brine, and dried. It is given some additional curing. Provolone cheese may be smoked, and one or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Blue or green color in an amount to neutralize the natural yellow color of the curd.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the cheese during the kneading and stretching process and/or applied to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate used to bleach the dairy ingredients. The weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk being bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, vitamin A is added to the curd in such quantity as to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(c) Nomenclature. (1) The name of the food is "provolone cheese". The name of the food may include the common name of the shape of the cheese, such as "salami provolone".

(2) One of the following terms, in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters used in the name of the food, shall accompany the name of the food wherever it appears on the principal display panel or panels:

(i) "Smoked" if the food has been smoked.

(ii) "Not smoked" if the food has not been smoked.

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2745, Jan. 21, 1983, as amended at 48 FR 49014, Oct. 24, 1983; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.182 Soft ripened cheeses.

(a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are soft ripened cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. Their solids contain not less than 50 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a), (b), and (d). If the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria or other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. After coagulation the mass is so treated as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. Such treatment may include one or more of the following: Cutting, stirring, heating, dilution with water or brine. The whey, or part of it, is drained off, and the curd is collected and shaped. It may be placed in forms, and may be pressed. Harmless flavor-producing microorganisms may be added. It is cured under conditions suitable for development of biological curing agents on the surface of the cheese, and the curing is conducted so that the cheese cures from the surface toward the center. Salt may be added during the procedure. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of soft ripened cheeses may be added, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) For the purposes of this section:

(1) The word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water, in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any such concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Milk shall be deemed to have been pasteurized if it has been held at a temperature of not less than 143 deg. F for a period of not less than 30 minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction.

(d) The name of each soft ripened cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Soft ripened cheese", preceded or followed by:

(1) The specific common or usual name of such soft ripened cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized therefor; or

(2) If no such specific common or usual name has become generally recognized therefor, an arbitrary or fanciful name which is not false or misleading in any particular.

(e) When milk other than cow's milk is used in whole or in part, the name of the cheese includes the statement "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milk used, in order of predominance by weight.

(f) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.183 Romano cheese.

(a) Romano cheese is the food prepared from cow's milk or sheep's milk or goat's milk or mixtures of two or all of these and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It grates readily, and has a granular texture and a hard and brittle rind. It contains not more than 34 percent of moisture, and its solids contain not less than 38 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5(a), (b), and (d). It is cured for not less than 5 months.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial blue or green coloring in a quantity which neutralizes any natural yellow coloring in the curd may be added. Rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to be a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into particles no larger than corn kernels, stirred, and heated to a temperature of about 120 deg. F. The curd is allowed to settle to the bottom of the kettle or vat, and is then removed and drained for a short time, packed in forms or hoops, and pressed. The pressed curd is salted by immersing in brine for about 24 hours and is then removed from the brine and the surface allowed to dry. It is then alternately rubbed with salt and washed at intervals. It may be perforated with needles. It is finally drycured. During curing it is turned and scraped. The surface may be rubbed with vegetable oil. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of romano cheese may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c)(1) For the purposes of this section, the word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any such concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Such milk may be bleached by the use of benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate; but the weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium, sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, sufficient vitamin A is added to the curd to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(d) Safe and suitable antimycotic agent(s), the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed current good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(e) When romano cheese is made solely from cow's milk, the name of such cheese is "Romano cheese made from cow's milk", and may be preceded by the word "Vaccino" (or "Vacchino"); when made solely from sheep's milk, the name is "Romano cheese made from sheep's milk", and may be preceded by the word "Pecorino"; when made solely from goat's milk, the name is "Romano cheese made from goat's milk", and may be preceded by the word "Caprino"; and when a mixture of two or all of the milks specified in this section is used, the name of the cheese is "Romano cheese made from ___", the blank being filled in with the names of the milks used, in order of predominance by weight.

(f) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) When milk other than cow's milk is used, in whole or in part, the common or usual name of each such milk ingredient shall be declared in order of predominance by weight; and

(2) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes".

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49014, Oct. 24, 1983; 49 FR 10095, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.184 Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

(a) Description. (1) Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold cheese, blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk, is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It is characterized by the presence of bluish-green mold, Penicillium roquefortii, throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 45 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Roquefort cheese is at least 60 days old.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into smaller portions and allowed to stand for a time. The mixed curd and whey is placed into forms permitting further drainage. While being placed in forms, spores of the mold Penicillium roquefortii are added. The forms are turned several times during drainage. When sufficiently drained, the shaped curd is removed from the forms and salted with dry salt or brine. Perforations are then made in the shaped curd and it is held at a temperature of approximately 50 deg. F at 90 to 95 percent relative humidity, until the characteristic mold growth has developed. During storage, the surface of the cheese may be scraped to remove surface growth of undesirable microorganisms. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Operational ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Forms of milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, of sheep origin, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "roquefort cheese", or alternatively, "sheep's milk blue-mold cheese" or "blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat from sheep's milk and nonfat sheep's milk" or "nonfat sheep's milk and milkfat from sheep's milk", as appropriate.

[54 FR 32058, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.185 Samsoe cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Samsoe cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It has a small amount of eye formation of approximately uniform size of about five-sixteenths inch (8 millimeters). The minimum milkfat content is 45 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 41 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Samsoe cheese is cured at not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of samsoe cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. After coagulation the mass is cut into small cube-shaped pieces with sides approximately three-eighths inch (1 centimeter). The mass is stirred and heated to about 102 deg. F, and so handled by further stirring, heating, dilution with water, and salting as to promote and regulate the separation of curd and whey. When the desired curd is obtained, it is transferred to forms permitting drainage of whey. During drainage, the curd is pressed. After drainage, the curd is removed from the forms and is further salted by immersing in a concentrated salt solution for about 3 days. The curd is then cured at a temperature of from 60deg. to 70 deg. F for 3 to 5 weeks to obtain the desired eye formation. Further curing is conducted at a lower temperature. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, applied to the surface of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "samsoe cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2745, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.186 Sap sago cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Sap sago cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The cheese is pale green in color and has the shape of a truncated cone. The maximum moisture content is 38 percent by weight, as determined by the method described in 133.5. Sap sago cheese is not less than 5 months old.

(2) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is allowed to become sour, and is heated to boiling temperature, with stirring. Sufficient sour whey is added to precipitate the casein. The curd is removed, spread out in boxes, and pressed, and while under pressure is allowed to drain and ferment. It is ripened for not less than 5 weeks. The ripened curd is dried and ground; salt and dried clover of the species Melilotus coerulea are added. The mixture is shaped into truncated cones and ripened. The optional ingredient in paragraph (b)(2) of this section may be added during this procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Nonfat milk, as defined in 133.3.

(2) Other optional ingredients. Buttermilk.

(c) Nonmenclature. The name of the food is "sap sago cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[54 FR 32058, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.187 Semisoft cheeses.

(a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are semisoft cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. They contain more than 39 percent, but not more than 50 percent, of moisture, and their solids contain not less than 50 percent of milkfat, as determined by the methods prescribed in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). If the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria or other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. After coagulation the mass is so treated as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. Such treatment may include one or more of the following: cutting, stirring, heating, dilution with water or brine. The whey, or part of it, is drained off, and the curd is collected and shaped. It may be placed in forms, and may be pressed. Harmless flavor-producing microorganisms may be added. It may be cured in a manner to promote the growth of biological curing agents. Salt may be added during the procedure. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of semisoft cheese may be added, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) For the purposes of this section:

(1) The word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom, or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Milk shall be deemed to have been pasteurized if it has been held at a temperature of not less than 143 deg. F for a period of not less than 30 minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A semisoft cheese shall be deemed not to have been made from pasteurized milk if 0.25 gram shows a phenol equivalent of more than 5 micrograms when tested by the method prescribed in 133.5(c).

(d) Semisoft cheeses in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight, calculated as sorbic acid.

(e) The name of each semisoft cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Semisoft cheese", preceded or followed by:

(1) The specific common or usual name of such semisoft cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized therefor; or

(2) If no such specific common or usual name has become generally recognized therefor, an arbitrary or fanciful name which is not false or misleading in any particular.

(f)(1) When milk other than cow's milk is used in whole or in part, the name of the cheese includes the statement "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milk used, in order of predominance by weight.

(2) If semisoft cheese in sliced or cut form contains an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, the label shall bear the statement "___ added to retard mold growth" or "___ added as a preservative", the blank being filled in with the common name or names of the mold-inhibiting ingredient or ingredients used.

(3) Wherever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the words and statements prescribed by this section, showing the optional ingredient used, shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name, without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter.

(g) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10096, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.188 Semisoft part-skim cheeses.

(a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are semisoft part-skim cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from partly skimmed milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. They contain not more than 50 percent of moisture, and their solids contain not less than 45 percent, but less than 50 percent, of milkfat, as determined by the methods set forth in 133.5 (a), (b), and (d). If the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F, for not less than 60 days.

(b) Milk, which may be pasteurized or clarified or both, and which may be warmed, is subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria or other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation singly or in any combination (with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to a semisolid mass. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. After coagulation the mass is so treated as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. Such treatment may include one or more of the following: Cutting, stirring, heating, dilution with water or brine. The whey, or part of it, is drained off, and the curd is collected and shaped. It may be placed in forms, and it may be pressed. Harmless flavor-producing microorganisms may be added. It may be cured in a manner to promote the growth of biological curing agents. Salt may be added during the procedure. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of semisoft part-skim cheese may be added in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) For the purposes of this section:

(1) The word "milk" means cow's milk or goat's milk or sheep's milk or mixtures of two or all of these. Such milk may be adjusted by separating part of the fat therefrom or (in the case of cow's milk) by adding one or more of the following: Cream, skim milk, concentrated skim milk, nonfat dry milk; (in the case of goat's milk) the corresponding products from goat's milk; (in the case of sheep's milk) the corresponding products from sheep's milk; water in a quantity sufficient to reconstitute any such concentrated or dried products used.

(2) Milk shall be deemed to have been pasteurized if it has been held at a temperature of not less than 143 deg. F for a period of not less than 30 minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A semisoft part-skim cheese shall be deemed not to have been made from pasteurized milk if 0.25 gram shows a phenol equivalent of more than 5 micrograms when tested by the method prescribed in 133.5(c).

(d) Semisoft part-skim cheeses in the form of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages may contain an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any combination of two or more of these, in an amount not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight, calculated as sorbic acid.

(e) The name of each semisoft part-skim cheese for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Semisoft part-skim cheese," preceded or followed by:

(1) The specific common or usual name of such semisoft cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized therefor; or

(2) If no such specific common or usual name has become generally recognized therefor, an arbitrary or fanciful name which is not false or misleading in any particular.

(f)(1) When milk other than cow's milk is used in whole or in part, the name of the cheese includes the statement "made from ___", the blank being filled in with the name or names of the milk used, in order of predominance by weight.

(2) If semi-soft part-skim cheese in sliced or cut form contains an optional mold-inhibiting ingredient as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, the label shall bear the statement "___ added to retard mold growth" or "___ added as a preservative", the blank being filled in with the common name or names of the mold-inhibiting ingredient or ingredients used.

(3) Wherever the name of the food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the words and statements prescribed by this section, showing the optional ingredient used, shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name, without intervening written, printed, or graphic matter.

(g) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 19, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10096, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.189 Skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

(a) Skim milk cheese for manufacturing is the food prepared from skim milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, or by another procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in paragraph (b) of this section is used. It contains not more than 50 percent of moisture, as determined by the method prescribed in 133.5 (a). It is coated with blue-colored paraffin or other tightly adhering coating, colored blue.

(b) Skim milk or the optional dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (c) of this section, which may be pasteurized, and which may be warmed, are subjected to the action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added thereto. Harmless artificial coloring may be added. Sufficient rennet, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces equivalent curd formation, or both, with or without purified calcium chloride in a quantity not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the skim milk, is added to set the skim milk to a semisolid mass. The mass is so cut, stirred, and heated with continued stirring, as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. The whey is drained off, and the curd is matted into a cohesive mass. Proteins from the whey may be incorporated. The mass is cut into slabs which are so piled and handled as to promote the drainage of whey and the development of acidity. The slabs are then cut into pieces, which may be rinsed by pouring or sprinkling water over them, with free and continuous drainage; but the duration of such rinsing is so limited that only the whey on the surface of such pieces is removed. The curd is salted, stirred, further drained, and pressed into forms. A harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of flavor of skim milk cheese for manufacturing may be added during the procedure, in such quantity that the weight of the solids of such preparation is not more than 0.1 percent of the weight of the milk used.

(c) The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (b) of this section are: Skim milk or concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk or a mixture of any two or more of these, with water in a quantity not in excess of that sufficient to reconstitute any concentrated skim milk or nonfat dry milk used.

(d) For the purposes of this section, "skim milk" means cow's milk from which the milk fat has been separated.

(e) Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 49 FR 10096, Mar. 19, 1984; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.190 Spiced cheeses.

(a) Description. (1) Spiced cheeses are cheeses for which specifically applicable definitions and standards of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. The food is prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. The minimum milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids, as determined by the method described in 133.5. The food contains spices, in a minimum amount of 0.015 ounce per pound of cheese, and may contain spice oils. If the dairy ingredients are not pasteurized, the cheese is cured at a temperature of not less than 35 deg. F for at least 60 days.

(2) The phenol equivalent of 0.25 gram of spiced cheese is not more than 3 micrograms, as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be warmed and is subjected to the action of a harmless lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is divided into smaller portions and so handled by stirring, heating, and diluting with water or salt brine as to promote and regulate the separation of whey and curd. The whey is drained off. The curd is removed and may be further drained. The curd is then shaped into forms, and may be pressed. At some time during the procedure, spices are added so as to be evenly distributed throughout the finished cheese. One or more of the other optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, or corresponding products of goat or sheep origin, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) of the weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Salt.

(iv) Spice oils which do not, alone or in combination with other ingredients, simulate the flavor of cheese of any age or variety.

(v) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(vi) Antimycotic agents, applied to the surface of slices or cuts in consumer-sized packages.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "spiced cheese". The following terms shall accompany the name of the food, as appropriate:

(1) The specific common or usual name of the spiced cheese, if any such name has become generally recognized; or

(2) An arbitrary or fanciful name that is not false or misleading in any particular.

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", or "milkfat from goat's milk and nonfat goat's milk", etc., as appropriate.

[54 FR 32059, Aug. 4, 1989, as amended at 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.191 Part-skim spiced cheeses.

Part-skim spiced cheeses conform to the definition and standard of identity, and are subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients prescribed for spiced cheeses by 133.190, except that their solids contain less than 50 percent, but not less than 20 percent, of milkfat.

[58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.193 Spiced, flavored standardized cheeses.

(a) Except as otherwise provided for herein and in applicable sections in this part, a spiced or flavored standardized cheese conforms to the applicable definitions, standard of identity and requirements for label statement of ingredients prescribed for that specific natural cheese variety promulgated pursuant to section 401 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. In addition a spiced and/or flavored standardized cheese shall contain one or more safe and suitable spices and/or flavorings, in such proportions as are reasonably required to accomplish their intended effect: Provided, That, no combination of ingredients shall be used to simulate the flavor of cheese of any age or variety.

(b) The name of a spiced or flavored standardized cheese shall include in addition to the varietal name of the natural cheese, a declaration of any flavor and/or spice that characterizes the food, in the manner prescribed in 101.22 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.195 Swiss and emmentaler cheese.

(a) Description. (1) Swiss cheese, emmentaler cheese, is the food prepared by the procedure set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and chemical properties. It has holes or eyes developed throughout the cheese. The minimum milkfat content is 43 percent by weight of the solids and the maximum moisture content is 41 percent by weight, as determined by the methods described in 133.5. The dairy ingredients used may be pasteurized. Swiss cheese is at least 60 days old.

(2) If pasteurized dairy ingredients are used, the phenol equivalent value of 0.25 gram of swiss cheese is not more than 3 micrograms as determined by the method described in 133.5.

(3) One or more of the dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be bleached, warmed, or treated with hydrogen peroxide/catalase, and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing and propionic acid-producing bacterial cultures. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is added to set the dairy ingredients to a semisolid mass. The mass is cut into particles similar in size to wheat kernels. For about 30 minutes the particles are alternately stirred and allowed to settle. The temperature is raised to about 126 deg. F. Stirring is continued until the curd becomes firm. The acidity of the whey at this point, calculated as lactic acid, does not exceed 0.13 percent. The curd is transferred to hoops or forms and pressed until the desired shape and firmness are obtained. The cheese is then salted by immersing it in a saturated salt solution for about 3 days. It is then held at a temperature of about 50deg. to 60 deg. F. for a period of 5 to 10 days, after which it is held at a temperature of about 75 deg. F. until it is approximately 30 days old, or until the so-called eyes form. Salt, or a solution of salt in water, is added to the surface of the cheese at some time during the curing process. The cheese is then stored at a lower temperature for further curing. One or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section may be added during the procedure.

(b) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used:

(1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in 133.3, used alone or in combination.

(2) Clotting enzymes. Rennet and/or other clotting enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin.

(3) Other optional ingredients. (i) Coloring.

(ii) Calcium chloride in an amount not more than 0.02 percent (calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride) by weight of the dairy ingredients, used as a coagulation aid.

(iii) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin, used in curing or flavor development.

(iv) Antimycotic agents, the cumulative levels of which shall not exceed good manufacturing practice, may be added to the surface of the cheese.

(v) Benzoyl peroxide or a mixture of benzoyl peroxide with potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate used to bleach the dairy ingredients. The weight of the benzoyl peroxide is not more than 0.002 percent of the weight of the milk being bleached, and the weight of the potassium alum, calcium sulfate, and magnesium carbonate, singly or combined, is not more than six times the weight of the benzoyl peroxide used. If milk is bleached in this manner, vitamin A is added to the curd in such quantity as to compensate for the vitamin A or its precursors destroyed in the bleaching process, and artificial coloring is not used.

(vi) Hydrogen peroxide, followed by a sufficient quantity of catalase preparation to eliminate the hydrogen peroxide. The weight of the hydrogen peroxide shall not exceed 0.05 percent of the weight of the milk and the weight of the catalase shall not exceed 20 parts per million of the weight of the milk treated.

(c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "swiss cheese", or alternatively, "emmentaler cheese".

(d) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that:

(1) Enzymes of animal, plant, or microbial origin may be declared as "enzymes"; and

(2) The dairy ingredients may be declared, in descending order of predominance, by the use of the terms "milkfat and nonfat milk" or "nonfat milk and milkfat", as appropriate.

[48 FR 2746, Jan. 21, 1983; 48 FR 11426, Mar. 18, 1983, as amended at 55 FR 6795, Feb. 27, 1990; 58 FR 2895, Jan. 6, 1993]

Sec. 133.196 Swiss cheese for manufacturing.

Swiss cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for swiss cheese by 133.195, except that the holes, or eyes, have not developed throughout the entire cheese.

[55 FR 6795, Feb. 27, 1990]

Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321, 341, 343, 348, 371, 379e.

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