Lesson 4 Coding Food, Food-Related, Cosmetic and Vitamin Products

Lesson Menu

Food and Food-related Products - Industry Codes 02-50
Miscellaneous Food-Related Products – Industry Code 52
Cosmetic Products
Vitamins, Minerals, Proteins, and Unconventional Dietary Specialties – Industry Code 54
 

The Food and Food-Related Products - Industry Codes 02- 50

Glossary
Food and Food-related Classes
Food and Food-related Subclasses
Food and Food-related Process Indication Codes
Check Your Knowledge
Code the Products

The Food and Food related products represent the categories most frequently handled. This Lesson describes the products under Industry Codes 02-50. Click on the drop down menu to see a list of these industries.

When determining product codes for food and food related products, you start with the Industry Code, move to the Class and then select the Product. For the most part, if you have basic information from the manufacturer about the product you are coding, you should be able to find the correct entries for these fields using the Product Code Builder application.

Several large food-related industries are assigned more than one industry code. These are Fruit and Fruit Products, Vegetables and Vegetable Products, and Food Additives. The easiest way to code products in multiple industry codes is by name search. Enter a word related to the product and review the list that the application returns. If you do select an industry code first, be sure to select all the codes assigned to the product group. For example Fruit and Fruit Products are assigned Industry Codes 20, 21 and 22. Select all three codes to search for all Fruit and Fruit-related products.

 

Glossary

There are several terms you should be familiar with as you code Food and Food-related products.

Color Additive: A dye, pigment, or other substance, whether synthetic or derived from a vegetable, mineral, or other source, which imparts a color when added or applied to a food, drug, cosmetic, or the human body.

Food: Articles used for food or drink for humans or other animals, chewing gum, and articles used as a component of any such article.

Food Additive: Articles which may by their intended uses become components of food, either directly or indirectly, or which may otherwise affect the characteristics of the food. You need to know the function of the food additive in order to determine its Class Code. Check the information provided by the manufacturer to determine the function.

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The Food and Food-Related Classes

There are numerous Class codes associated with the Food and Food-related industries. Some food industries have a few Classes and others have over twenty. The class code designates the food group, or use of the product. As you use the Product Code Builder application, you will become familiar with the wide variety of product Classes assigned to the Food and Food-related industries. Information from the manufacturer should assist you in selecting the correct Class code.

Several examples are provided here to help get you acquainted with food classes. Click on an Industry to review the associated Classes.

Bakery Products - 03    
Egg and Egg Products - 15    
Nuts and Edible Seeds Products - 23    
Food Additive (Human Use) Products - 45    
Food Additive (Human Use) Products - 46    
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The Food and Food-Related Subclasses

For products under Industry codes 02 – 50, subclass refers to the container type – the primary materials that contact and/or hold the product.

Food container materials are important to the FDA because they can affect food products in numerous ways. Food containers maintain freshness, prevent damage and spoilage, make the product more attractive, etc. Food containers can also contaminate the product through chemical migration, foreign objects, etc.

The materials used for containers by the food industry are varied depending upon the product, type of storage, physical character of the food, etc. Many materials and combinations of materials can be used for food containers. Only the common container materials are listed below and throughout the Product Code.

Containers should be coded by specifying the primary material that contacts and/or holds the product. For example, in many instances an inner coating or film may actually contact the food, such as coatings on the interior surfaces of metal cans or the coating inside paper boxes. But, in these two examples, the container type would be "metal" and "paper" respectively, since they are the primary container materials.

Examples of other container types are: a plastic bag or a paper bag within an outer box. In these two cases, the container types would be "plastic film" and "paper," respectively. For many containers, the primary container material may not be readily visible as in the case of lined boxes, laminated containers, etc. In these cases, an inspector may need to ask plant management for a sample of the product and then carefully examine the container. Import filers will have to obtain the information from the import documentation, Importer of Record or the manufacturer or shipper.

The table below gives you some examples of the type of containers that should be coded under the common container materials listed in the subclass.

SUBCLASS

NAME

CONTAINER TYPES

A

Fabric Containers

Textile or fabric bag, stocking or casing, burlap, etc.

B

Ceramic, Earthenware

Ceramic jar, earthenware bottle, crock, jar, etc.

C

Glass

Glass containers with coated or uncoated aluminum lids; cork stoppers; lined or unlined plastic lids; coated, lined or bare steel-based plate lids; coated or uncoated tin lids, lined or unlined tin lids.

D

Laminated (flexible or rigid)

Laminated containers are a variety of different materials BONDED together, such as layered containers comprised of paper and foil, paper and plastic, etc. This includes laminated pouches and bags, and laminated tubes with plastic, cork-lined, foil-lined, laminated and aluminum lids.

E

Metal

Containers comprised of aluminum, tin or tinless steel-based material. Includes aluminum cans, trays, tubes and foil; and foil lines, loose or unbonded, within a paper bag, sack, pouch, etc.

F

Paper

Fiber (board) barrels, drums, pouches, sacks, bags, boxes, cartons, etc. Also includes tubes with aluminum ends. Note: includes wax paper, etc.

G

Plastic, Synth (flexible)

Plastic bags, pouches, wrappers, boil-in-bags, shrink packs, squeeze bottles or tubes with line/unlined tops, etc. Also includes plastic lines, loose or unbonded within a paper bag, sack, pouch, etc.

H

Nonflex Plastic, (rigid, or semi-rigid)

Rigid or semi-rigid plastic containers with plastic aluminum, steel-based, or tin lids. Also includes plastic trays or pans with foil, cellophane, paper or cardboard covers.

J

Wood

Wood barrel, cask, wheel, box, drum, etc.

M

Multiple

Use only when there is more than one type of food contact container of different materials. Examples: pizza mix kits, noodle and cheese dinners, etc.

V

Vacuum or Modified Atmosphere Packaging

Either gases have been removed (vacuum) or the air in the package or container is replaced by one or more gases, in various concentrations (modified atmosphere-packaging), before the package is commercially sterile

but may be hermetically sealed. Product is not shelf stable (e.g., requires refrigeration or freezing).

W

Wax

Products with a wax covering such as cheese, vegetables, etc. (Excludes waxed paper)

Y

Container Type, N.E.C. Container type unknown or no container used.

Not Elsewhere Classified. No container, such as fresh vegetable products in open baskets or in display bins and naturally covered products, such as bananas, unshucked corn, eggs, etc.


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The Food-Related Process Indication Codes (PIC)

The Process Indicator Codes describes the process used in preparing a food product. There are 14 possible processes to choose from. The first decision to be made is whether or not a product is Unprocessed (Raw) or Processed (Packaged). The invoice or other product information that you may have should help you determine whether the product is unprocessed or processed.

If the product has not been processed, the appropriate Raw PIC (i.e., B, C or D) is used. Keep in mind that Raw refers to unprocessed and raw (e.g., fresh, and or in natural state). If the product has received any type of processing, the Raw PICs do not apply. For example, filleted, skinned, fresh fish; peeled or deveined shrimp; or smoked fish are processed foods. One of the processed PICs should be selected.

The most widely used PIC for processed foods is Packaged Food. However, when appropriate, a specific PIC should be utilized, such as, identifying the heat treatment used in preparing the finished produce (e.g., heat treated (cooked); pasteurized; commercially sterile; ultrapasteurized; or aseptic pack; or identifying other types of processing used. The invoice or other product information that you may have should help you determine the type of processing used.

Below is a brief definition of the PIC codes currently in use.

PROCESS INDICATOR CODE

NAME

PROCESS TYPE DEFINITION/EXPLANATION

B

Raw

Product is in its natural state, (e.g., fresh, raw and/or natural product). The product is NOT stored or transported refrigerated or frozen, but held in ambient temperatures (e.g., grains, nuts, or seeds, etc.)

C

Raw, Fresh Refrigerated

Product is in its natural state (e.g., fresh, raw and/or natural product). Includes such functions as waxing, polishing, etc. that make a raw product appear better (e.g., fresh product). The product may be fresh packaged and refrigerated or on wet ice. Includes de-headed "shell on" shrimp de-headed and/or gutted whole fish, etc. See also PIC "T."

D

Raw, Fresh Frozen

Product is in natural state (e.g., fresh, raw and/or natural product). The product may be fresh packaged and frozen. Includes frozen de-headed "shell-on" shrimp, de-headed and/or gutted whole fish, etc. See also PIC "T."

Note: Filleted. Skinned, fresh fish or peeled/deveined shrimp is a processed food and will be in PIC Code "T"

For de-headed raw "shell-on" shrimp; gutted and/or de-headed whole fish, etc., use the following PIC codes as applicable: "raw, fresh, refrigerated" use code "C", "raw, fresh frozen" use code "D"

E

Commercially Sterile

Packed in hermetically sealed containers; then heated to achieve commercial sterility. Product is shelf stable.

Examples of commercially sterile products include canned vegetables and canned fish products.

Note: canned fruit, most tomato products, and pickled vegetable products do not fall within this process because they are not heated to achieve commercial sterility.

F

Aseptic Pack

Heated to achieve commercial sterility and packed using pre-sterilized containers and closures and then hermetically sealed.

Examples of products that may be aseptically packed include single serving milk based drink product and single serving pudding products.

H

Dried Natural Or Artificial

The product is either dried naturally or by using heat, cold and/ or chemicals.

Examples include raisins, dried fruit mixes, nonfat dry milk, etc.

I

Acidified

Packed in hermetically sealed containers; acids or acid foods added to low-acid food(s). May be heat treated or pasteurized. Product is shelf stable.

Vegetables such as peppers, pickles and relish are acidified.

N

Heat Treated

Product or concentrate is heated or partially heated (e.g., baked, blanche, cooked, fried, boiled, etc.). The product is not commercially sterile but may be hermetically sealed. Product is not shelf stable (e.g., requires refrigeration or freezing).

O

Pasteurized

Product or concentrate is heated at a temperature of 145 F for 30 minutes or 161 F for 15 seconds. The process will destroy certain disease-producing organisms; destroy or reduce the number of spoilage organisms in certain foods. The product is not commercially sterile but may be hermetically sealed. Product is not shelf stable (e.g., requires refrigeration or freezing). Product labeling in most cases will reflect this process (e.g. crabmeat, apple cider, orange juice, egg nog, etc.).

P

Cultured Or Cured

The product is cultured, fermented, salted (brined), (pickled), smoked cured, sugar cured or has an enzymatic reaction which may be the result of naturally occurring enzymes or chemicals.

Examples of cultured or cured products include sauerkraut, wine, aged cheese (hard or soft) and naturally fermented pickles. Note that this does not include products that have been processed by direct acidification (adding an acid ingredient, such as vinegar, directly to the product). Those products are coded as Acidified.

R

Irradiated

Product is irradiated. Irradiated products receive treatment with radiation as a method of preservation. This process is used infrequently. Without information from the manufacturer it is difficult to determine whether a product has been irradiated.

Examples of products that may be processed in this manner are spices.

S

Ultrapasteurized

Product or concentrate is heated between 190-120 F or greater with exposure time from 1 second or greater. The process will destroy certain disease-producing organisms; destroy or reduce the number of spoilage organisms in certain foods. The product is not commercially sterile but may be hermetically sealed. Product is not shelf stable (e.g., requires refrigeration or freezing). Product labeling in most cases will reflect this process (e.g., coffee creamer, shelf-stable milk, etc.).

T

Packaged Food
(Not commercially sterile)

These products are not commercially sterile but may be hermetically sealed (e.g., shelf stable fruit drink in cans, tomato juice, and pineapple juice). The product may or may not be shelf-stable (e.g., may be held ambient, refrigerated, or frozen). Processing of the finished product may include any of the following processes:

  • Addition of sauces, breading, etc.
  • Milling, grinding, or mixing of dry ingredients
  • Filleting, skinning fresh fish, shucking shellfish
  • Peeling, deveining raw shrimp

Y

N.E.C.

Not Elsewhere Classified

This classification is for products that receive a new or unusual process that does not fit any of the other PICs.


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Check Your Knowledge

1. You are coding a food additive known as monosodium glutamate (MSG). Reading the manufacturer's information you determine that MSG is used to increase the flavor of food. Which of the following Food Additive Class Codes would you select for MSG?

Answer  

2. A shipment of frozen shrimp is ready to be coded. You successfully determine Industry Code and Class Code. The product is packed in plastic bags that are placed in large cardboard cartons. Which of the following Subclasses would you select for this product?

Answer  

3. The product you are coding is Canadian snow crab legs. The crab legs were flash frozen and then shipped to the U.S. Which one of the following Process Indication Codes (PIC) should you choose?

Answer  
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 Code the Products

Now you will have a chance to practice coding some food and food-related products. Below you will find five product descriptions. Read the descriptions and then click on the PCB Application button below. This will take you to the Product Code Builder application.

Have notepaper and a pen or pencil handy. As you code each product, jot down the product code result. When you're ready to check your answers, click the Tutorial button on the Taskbar. The Taskbar is located at the bottom of the screen. This will bring you back here. Caution: Don't click the Tutorial button in the Product Code Builder application, it will take you to the beginning of the Tutorial.

1. SPRING WATER, 12 x 750 ml GLASS BOTTLES PER CASE (reveal code)

2. CHIANTI WINE, 12/750 ml BOTTLES PER CASE (reveal code)

3. FRUIT FLAVORED HARD CANDIES, CELLO WRAPPED IN 25lb. BULK CARTONS (reveal code)

4. FROZEN WHOLE SWORDFISH, 2 FISH PER WOODEN CASE (reveal code)

5. PROVOLONE CHEESE, 2/20 lb. PLASTIC WRAPPED LOAVES/CASE (reveal code)

Check your answers - Click on reveal code for each product description to reveal the correct product code. Compare it with the one you got. Did you get the correct code? If not, determine which element was incorrect. You can go back through the lesson and review the various elements of the product code. Then, go back to the product code builder application and try again.

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Miscellaneous Food-Related Items - Industry Code 52

Miscellaneous Food-related Classes
Miscellaneous Food-related Subclasses
Miscellaneous Food-related Process Indicator Codes
Check Your Knowledge
Code the Products

Products in Industry Code 52 are predominantly those typically used in preparation and serving of food and drink products. Examples include cooking utensils, dishes, cups, mugs, stemware, and containers. In addition, the FDA uses Code 52 to code: exhibits used for evidence development, infant food items and live animals.

Only products in Class A, foodware, cookware, and tableware class, are coded with specific Subclass and PIC codes. All other products use Subclass Y, Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.) and PIC code Y, also Not Elsewhere Classified.

 

The Miscellaneous Food-Related Items Classes

CLASS

NAME

PRODUCT EXAMPLES

A

Foodware, Cookware & Tableware

Food contact articles, including dishes, flatware, beverage glasses, mugs, cooking utensils, cutlery, and electrical appliances.

B

Food Related Items

Corn husks, pesticides, sausage casings, wooden skewers

D

Live Animals

Turtles, tortoises, terrapins. Live animals not elsewhere classified.

E

Infant Food Items

Baby bottle rubber nipples, n.e.c, pacifiers containing ingestible foods (e.g., honey)

Y

Exhibit (Evidence Development)

Includes the following: live animals, manure, animal waste, non-potable water, sewage, soil, woodshavings, etc.


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The Miscellaneous Food-Related Items Subclasses

The following Subclasses are used for products under Industry Code 52, Class A, Foodware, Cookware and Tableware. The subclasses describe how the product is used.

Subclass Y is used for all Industry Code 52 products that are not found under Class A. "Y" may also be used with Class A if appropriate.

SUBCLASS

NAME

CONTAINER TYPES

I

(with 52A only)

Tableware for Adult Use

Dishes, Flatware, Spatula, Tongs, Utensils

J

(with 52A only)

Tableware for Adult Use - Set

Dishes, Flatware, Stemware, Utensil sets

K

(with 52A only)

Tableware for Infant/Child Use

Child's training cup

L

(with 52A only)

Tableware for Infant/Child Use -Set

Utensil sets

M

(with 52A only)

Cookware Oven/Stove/ Flame

Pots, frying pans, etc.

N

(with 52A only)

Cookware Oven/Stove/ Flame - Set

Cookware sets

O

(with 52A only)

Cookware Appliance w/Electric Heat Source

Coffee maker, teapot

P

(with 52A only)

Cookware Appliance w/Electric Heat Source - Set

A 'kitchen starter' set that would include an electrical heating appliance, e.g., hot pot, coffee pot, heating coil, in addition to various kitchen household items.

Y

Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.)

Can be used for Class A and is always used for Classes B, C, D, E and Y


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The Miscellaneous Food-Related Items Process Indicator Codes (PIC)

All but one of the PIC codes are used for Class A products only. The PIC is used to describe the primary material that is used to make the product. For example, a set of stemware may be glass or lead crystal, utensils can be stainless steel or sterling silver. This information should be available from the manufacturer or listed on the product label.

For products other than 52A, always select PIC "Y" N.E.C. Below is a brief definition of the PIC codes currently in use.

PROCESS INDICATOR CODE

NAME

PROCESS TYPE DEFINITION/EXPLANATION

A

Aluminum

A silvery-white, ductile metallic element, primarily found in bauxite. Aluminum has good conductive and thermal properties (e.g., frying pan).

B

Antimony

A metallic element having four allotropic forms, the most common of which is a hard, extremely brittle, lustrous, silver-white, crystalline material. It is used in a wide variety of alloys and in the manufacture of flameproofing compounds, and ceramic products.

C

Bone China

Translucent white china made with bone ash or calcium phosphate and characterized by whiteness.

D

Brass Or Brass Plated

A yellowish alloy of copper and zinc, sometimes including small amounts of other metals, but usually 67 percent copper and 33 percent zinc (e.g., pitcher).

E

Ceramic

Any of various hard, brittle, heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant materials made by shaping and then firing a nonmetallic mineral, such as clay, at a high temperature (e.g., salad bowl).

F

Chrome Or Chrome Plate

Chromium or chromium alloy. Something plated with a chromium alloy (e.g., drinking cup).

G

Copper

A ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat. A large cooking pot may be made of copper.

H

Enamel On Metal

A vitreous, usually opaque, protective or decorative coating baked on metal (e.g., stove to ovenware).

I

Glass

A hard, brittle, translucent, and commonly transparent substance, white or colored, made by fusing together sand or silica with lime, potash, soda, or lead oxide. Considered to be super-cooled liquids rather than true solids (e.g., beverage glasses).

J

Glass Ceramic

A durable substance made with glass and clay able to withstand temperature extremes without cracking. For example, Corningware™ products are glass-ceramic.

K

Gold Or Gold Plate

A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant element. It is the most malleable and ductile metal. Something plated with gold (e.g., flatware).

L

Iron, Cast Iron

The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents.

Cast Iron is an alloy of iron containing so much carbon that it is brittle and so cannot be wrought but must be shaped by casting (e.g., frying pan, skillet).

M

Lead Crystal

Lead Crystal defines glassware made from mineral quartz and lead. In general, crystal means lead or flint based glass that is clear in color. It can be plain or decorated (e.g., wine, water glasses, and goblets).

N

Metal Unknown

Any of a category of electropositive elements that usually have a shiny surface, are generally good conductors of heat.

O

Nickel

A silvery, hard, ductile, ferromagnetic metallic element used in alloys, in corrosion-resistant surfaces, and for electroplating.

P

Non-Stick Coating

A material used to coat cooking utensils and in industrial applications where sticking is to be avoided, i.e., Teflon™.

Q

Paper

A material made of cellulose pulp, derived mainly from wood, rags, and certain grasses, processed into various products including cookware, tableware, and utensils.

R

Pewter

Any of numerous silver-gray alloys of tin with various amounts of antimony, copper, and sometimes lead, used widely for fine kitchen utensils and tableware (e.g., stemware).

S

Plastic, Polymer

Any of various organic compounds produced by polymerization, capable of being molded, extruded, cast into various shapes and films.

T

Porcelain

A hard, white, translucent ceramic made by firing a pure clay and then glazing it with variously colored fusible materials (e.g., fine china, tea sets etc.).

U

Stainless Steel

Steel containing chromium that makes it resistant to corrosion (e.g., cooking pots, frying pans)

V

Sterling Silver or Silver Plate

A silver alloy with no more than 7.5% copper. Silver-plated products have been coated with a thin layer of silver, especially by electroplating (e.g., flatware, stemware).

X

Wood

The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber (e.g., salad bowl, utensils).

Y

Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.)

This classification is for products that receive a new or unusual process that does not fit any of the other PICs. It can be used for Class A but it is always used for Classes B, C, D, E and Y


Back to Miscellaneous Items Index

Check Your Knowledge

1. Which of the following products would NOT be found under Industry Code 52, Miscellaneous Food-Related Items.


Answer  

2. When coding a product under Industry Code 52, Class A (52A) what does the Process Indicator Code (PIC) tell you about the product?


Answer  

3. You are coding a set of porcelain dinner plates made with bone ash. Which PIC best describes the primary material used to make the product?


Answer  

Back to Miscellaneous Items Index

     Code the Products

Now you will have a chance to practice coding some food and food-related products. Below you will find five product descriptions. Read the descriptions and then click on the PCB Application button below. This will take you to the Product Code Builder application.

Have notepaper and a pen or pencil handy. As you code each product, jot down the product code result. When you're ready to check your answers, click the Tutorial button on the Taskbar. The Taskbar is located at the bottom of the screen. This will bring you back here. Caution: Don't click the Tutorial button in the Product Code Builder application, it will take you to the beginning of the Tutorial.

1. WOODEN SPOONS (reveal code)

2. PLASTIC DISPOSABLE CHOPSTICKS (reveal code)

3. HONEY-FLAVORED PLASTIC PACIFIERS (reveal code)

4. PORCELAIN DINNER SETS (reveal code)

5. BRASS TEAPOTS (reveal code)

Check your answers - Click on reveal code for each product description to reveal the correct product code. Compare it with the one you got. Did you get the correct code? If not, determine which element was incorrect. You can go back through the lesson and review the various elements of the product code. Then, go back to the product code builder application and try again.

Back to Miscellaneous Items Index

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Cosmetics - Industry Code 53

Glossary
Cosmetic Classes
Cosmetic Subclasses
Check Your Knowledge
Code the Products

Cosmetic products are covered under Industry Code 53. There is a unique set of Subclass codes for cosmetics, but Process Indicator Codes are not used. Although no Process Indicator Code is used in this Industry by FDA OASIS and FACTS users, filers must transmit a dash "-" on the PIC field. The Product Code Builder Application will return a dash automatically.

Some products you might think are cosmetics are actually classified as drugs. These include sunscreen products, fluoride toothpaste, anti-perspirants, and anti-aging products. Drug products are intended to affect the structure or function of the body of humans or animals. However, suntan preparations, deodorants and non-fluoride toothpaste are considered cosmetics because they are not intended to affect the structure or function of the body. You should carefully review the definitions of drug products found in Lesson 5 Coding Drugs, Drug Products and Biologics when determining if a product is a cosmetic or drug. It is also important to review the manufacturer's information before coding the product. When in doubt, contact the manufacturer for more information.

 

Glossary

Cosmetics: Articles intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body or any part thereof for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance. Also includes articles intended for use as a component of any such articles except that such term shall not include soap.

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The Cosmetic Classes

CLASS

NAME

PRODUCT EXAMPLES

A

Baby Product

Baby shampoos, lotions, oils, powders, etc.

B

Bath Prep

Bath oils, bubble baths

C

Eye Makeup Prep

Eyebrow pencil, eyeliner, eye shadow, eye makeup kits, etc.

D

Fragrance Prep

Colognes, toilet waters, perfumes, powders, sachets

E

Hair Preps (Non-Coloring)

Hair conditioners, sprays, straighteners, permanent waves, shampoos, etc.

F

Hair Coloring Prep

Hair dyes and colors, hair tints, rinses, lighteners, bleaches, etc.

G

Makeup Prep (Not For Eyes)

Blushers, face powders, lipstick, leg and body paints, rouges, etc.

H

Manicuring Prep

Basecoats, undercoats, cuticle softeners, creams, lotions, polish, enamel, etc.

I

Oral Hygiene Products

Dentifrice (aerosol, liquid, pastes, powders), mouthwashes, etc.

J

Personal Cleanliness

Bath soaps, deodorants, douches, etc.

K

Shaving Prep

Aftershave lotion, beard softeners, shaving cream, etc.

L

Skin Care Prep

Cleansing (cold creams, cleansing lotions, liquids, pads), depilatories, foot powders, sprays, moisturizers, wrinkle smoothing, etc.

M

Suntan Preparations

Suntan gels, creams and liquids, oral tanning tablets, etc.

P

Cosmetic Raw Material

Bulk raw ingredients used as a component for a cosmetic product (e.g., lanolin)

Q

Cosmetic Packaging/ Labeling

Cosmetic containers such as plastic eye shadow try or product labels to be used on the finished product or product wrapper (e.g., immediate container and/or printed cardboard box with instructions for use and ingredients).

R

Cosmetic Products Containing Animal By-Products (Bovine)

Used for hair and skin conditioning agents. Examples of bovine by-product used are collagen, tallow, amniotic fluid, and elastin. Bovine animal by-products can be found in skin care products, moisturizing preparations, cold creams, and cleansing lotions.

S

Cosmetic Products Containing Animal By-Products (Ovine)

Used for hair, skin and nail conditioning agents. Examples of ovine by-products used are hydrolyzed keratin, tallow. Ovine animal by-products can be found in hair conditioners, mascara, shampoos, and bath soaps

T

Cosmetic Products Containing Animal By-Products (Porcine)

Used for hair, skin and nail conditioning agents. Examples of porcine by-product used are brain extract, hydrolyzed keratin, pig leg muscle extract, and pigskin extract. Porcine animal by-products can be found in hair conditioners, mascara and shampoos.

U

Cosmetic Products Containing Animal By-Products (Other)

Examples of other animal by-products used in cosmetics are dried egg yolk, egg oil, egg white powder, albumen. Animal keratin amino acids, animal placental extract, hydrogenated animal glycerides, soluble animal collagen.

Y

Cosmetics and Cosmetic Products N.E.C.

Hairbrush, cosmetic brush, sponges for cosmetic use.


Back to Cosmetics Index

The Cosmetic Subclasses

The Subclasses for products under Industry Code 53 further describes the final form of the product.

SUBCLASS

NAME

PRODUCT FORM DEFINITION

A

Aerosol

A cloud of solid or liquid particles in a gas. Aerosol forces a liquid out as a fine spray usually when a button on the container is pressed.

B

Capsule

A small soluble container, usually made of gelatin, that encloses a substance. For example, a bath capsule may contain bath oils.

C

Cream

Any of various substances resembling cream that are applied to the skin.

D

Lotion

Any of various liquid cosmetic preparations that are applied to the skin.

F

Pads

A thin, cushion-like mass of soft material used to apply a substance to the skin.

G

Paste

A soft, smooth, thick mixture or material.

H

Powder

A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics.

I

Roll-on

Dispensers of a liquid cosmetic (such as a deodorant) having a revolving ball as an applicator.

J

Simulated (artificial fingernails, wigs, etc.)

An artificial product used for personal adornment such as a wig of human or synthetic hair, or "fake" fingernails.

K

Sticks

Something shaped or used like a stick or pencil, such as an eyebrow pencil.

L

Tablets

A product such as a bath preparation formed into a small pellet.

Y

Subclass, Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.)

 

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Check Your Knowledge

1. Which of the following products would be coded under Industry Code 53 Cosmetics?


Answer  

2. What does subclass tell you when coding a cosmetic product (Industry Code 53)?


Answer  

3. You are coding breath fresheners that look like small white pellets. Which one of the following Subclasses would you choose?


Answer  

Back to Cosmetics Index

   Code the Products

Now you will have a chance to practice coding some cosmetic products. Below you will find five product descriptions. Read the descriptions and then click on the PCB Application button below. This will take you to the Product Code Builder application.

Have notepaper and a pen or pencil handy. As you code each product, jot down the product code result. When you're ready to check your answers, click the Tutorial button on the Taskbar. The Taskbar is located at the bottom of the screen. This will bring you back here. Caution: Don't click the Tutorial button in the Product Code Builder application, it will take you to the beginning of the Tutorial.

1. RED NAIL POLISH (reveal code)

2. LIPSTICK (reveal code)

3. HAIRBRUSH (reveal code)

4. MEN'S AFTER-SHAVE LOTION (reveal code)

5. WOMEN'S PERFUME (reveal code)

Check your answers - Click on reveal code for each product description to reveal the correct product code. Compare it with the one you got. Did you get the correct code? If not, determine which element was incorrect. You can go back the product code builder application and try again.

Back to Cosmetics Index

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Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Products - Industry Code 54

Glossary
Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Classes
Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Subclasses
Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Process Indicator Codes
Check Your Knowledge
Code the Products

Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty products are covered under Industry Code 54. There is a unique set of Subclass codes for these products including different codes based on whether the product is for Food Use, Drug Use or Animal Use. The PIC codes are similar to those used for Antibiotics and Human Drugs and provide information concerning the dosage form of the product. There are four additional PICS used in this Industry. They are Raw (D), Packaged Foods (G), Dried – Natural or Artificial (T) and Cultured or Cured (W).

  • Dietary supplements are limited to products taken orally (ingested/absorbed via the gastrointestinal tract) all other methods of administration (sublingual, intra-nasal, per rectal, injectable) are drugs.
  • Code multi-ingredient products under the product class of the ingredient first listed in the active ingredient portion of the product labeling/active ingredient list. Be sure you're looking at the active ingredient list. Sometimes a product label may list all ingredients before the active ingredients. For example, sterile water may be listed as the first ingredient but it is not an active ingredient. Using this ingredient would cause the product to be miscoded.
  • Use the appropriate subclass for multi-ingredients based on whether the product is considered a human food dietary supplement or a drug.
  • If the product contains a drug or antibiotics as well as dietary supplement ingredients they should be coded as a drug or antibiotic, not a dietary supplement.
  • Vitamin and mineral products that make medical claims may be considered to be drug products and should be coded as such. For example, label claims concerning diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of a disease cause a product to meet the definition of a drug product. See Lesson 5 Coding Drugs, Drug Products and Biologics.

 

Glossary

Vitamin: Any of various fat-soluble or water-soluble organic substances essential in minute amounts for normal growth and activity of the body and obtained naturally from plant and animal foods.

Mineral: An inorganic element, such as calcium, iron, potassium, sodium, or zinc that is essential to the nutrition of human beings and animals.

Protein: Fundamental components of all living cells, includes many substances, such as enzymes, hormones, and antibodies, that are necessary for the proper functioning of an organism.

Dietary Supplement: A dietary supplement is any product taken by mouth that contains a ‘dietary ingredient" and its label clearly states that it is a dietary supplement. The ‘dietary ingredient’ may be a vitamin, mineral, herbal or botanical, amino acid as well as substances such as enzymes, organ tissue, metabolites, extracts or concentrates. A dietary supplement can be found in many forms such as tablets, capsules, liquids, or powders.

Unconventional Dietary Specialty: This term refers to products for humans and animals that are considered natural supplement sources from plants and animals. Examples include: bee pollen, royal jelly, Echinacea, St. John's wort, borage oil, shark cartilage, fish oil, guar gum, and spirulina.

Rx: A prescription drug. Under Industry Code 54, this can be a vitamin, mineral, protein or unconventional dietary specialty.

Non-Rx: Under Industry Code 54, this refers to a vitamin, mineral, protein or unconventional dietary specialty that can be obtained without a prescription.

Back to Vitamin and Mineral Index

The Vitamin, Mineral, Protein and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Product Classes

CLASS

NAME

PRODUCT EXAMPLES

A

Vitamin

Vitamin A, C, D, Niacin, Folic Acid, etc.

B

Mineral

Calcium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Zinc, etc.

C

Protein

L-Aspartic Acid, L-Glutamine, L-Serine, etc.

E

Herbal and Botanical Teas

Alfalfa, Echinacea, Ginko Biloba, St. John's Wort – code as "E" when used as teas

F

Herbal and Botanical (other than teas)

Alfalfa, Echinacea, Ginko Biloba, St. John's Wort – code as "F" when used as other than teas

G

Animal By-products and Extracts

Animal by-products and extracts from cows, sheep, pigs, sharks, etc.

H

Fats and Lipid Substances

Black currant oil, evening primrose oil, fish oil, Omega-3, etc.

I

Fiber

Guar Gum, Psyllium

Y

Vitamin/Mineral/ Protein and unconventional dietary specialty (N.E.C.)

Bee pollen, germanium, royal jelly, spirulina


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The Vitamin, Mineral, Protein and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Products Subclasses

The Subclasses for products under Industry Code 54 further describes the use of the product. You will need to know how the product is labeled to determine if the product (vitamin, mineral, protein or dietary specialty) is a human food supplement, a human drug, or an animal use product. A vitamin, mineral, protein or dietary supplement is considered a drug if it is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease in man or other animals.

For example, Vitamin E can be considered a food or a drug. Labeled as a dietary supplement, you would use one of the subclasses for Food Use or Animal Use (A, B, C, L, M). If the label states that it is used in the prevention of coronary heart disease, you would use one of the Drug or Animal subclasses (D, E, F, G, I, N, R). Another example is Iron. If it is used to prevent blindness in newborns it would be coded using a drug use subclass.

Note: Other human drugs not considered to be vitamins, minerals, proteins or dietary supplements are found under Industry Codes 60-66.

SUBCLASS

NAME

PRODUCT USE EXAMPLES

FOOD USES

A

Enrichment for Human Foods (generally used by manufacturers

Vitamin E; bulk form; intended for further manufacture into foods and/or dietary supplements.

B

Human Food Dietary Supplementation – single ingredient

Vitamin E; finished product ready for consumption; no other dietary ingredients present.

C

Human Food Dietary Supplementation – multi ingredients

Vitamin E; finished product; ready for consumption; in combination with one or more dietary ingredients.

DRUG USES

D

Human Non-Rx Drug Use – single ingredient

Vitamin E; finished product; ready for consumption with label claim ‘prevention of coronary heart disease"

E

Human Non-Rx Drug Use – combination of ingredients

Vitamin E and Omega-3; finished product; ready for consumption with label claim ‘prevention of coronary heart disease"

F

Human Rx Drug – single ingredient

Vitamin B12 intended for injection

G

Human Rx Drug Use – combination of ingredients

Vitamin B12 and B6 intended for injection

I

Investigational Drug Use

 

Y

Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.)

 

ANIMAL USES

L

Enrichment for Animal Feeds (generally used by feed manufacturers)

 

M

Animal Diet Supplementation

 

N

Animal Non-Rx Drug Use

 

R

Animal Rx Drug Use

 

FOOD, DRUG AND ANIMAL USES

Y

Subclass, Not Elsewhere Classified (N.E.C.)

 

Back to Vitamin and Mineral Index

The Vitamin, Mineral, Protein and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Products Process Indicator Codes (PIC)

The PIC is used to describe the form of the product. For example whether a vitamin is a tablet, capsule or a liquid. This information should be available from the manufacturer. Below is a brief definition of the PIC codes currently in use.

PROCESS INDICATOR CODE

NAME

PROCESS/FORM DEFINITION

A

Prompt Release Tablets

All prompt release tablets, coated or uncoated. Active ingredient immediately released

 

B

Extended Release Tablets

All extended release tablets, coated or uncoated (active ingredient released over a prolonged period).

C

Delayed Release Tablets

All tablets with delayed release (not extended release, e.g., enteric coated tablets, active ingredient releases and is absorbed in the intestines).

D

Raw

Product is in its natural state. The product may be fresh packaged, refrigerated or frozen.

E

Prompt Release Hard Gelatin Capsules

All hard gelatin capsules for prompt release.

F

Modified Release Hard Gelatin Capsules

All hard gelatin capsules having extended or delayed release.

 

G

Packaged Food (Not Commercially Sterile)

Processing of the finished product may include any of the following processes: pasteurization of all or some of the ingredients; partial cooking – blanching, baking, etc.
The products are not commercially sterile but may be hermetically sealed.

H

Soft Gelatin Capsules

All soft gelatin capsules.

J

Non-Sterile Ointments

Any of various substances resembling cream that have a healing effect when applied. An ointment has an oil base whereas a cream is water-soluble. Includes non-sterile ointment, cream, paste, dressing, poultice, gel, jelly.

K

Sterile Liquid

A sterile liquid is free from live bacteria or other microorganisms.

L

Non-sterile Liquid

Elixir, medicated shampoo, mouthwash, nasal spray solution, spirit, tincture, syrup suspension.

M

Suppositories

A small plug of medication designed to melt at body temperature within a body cavity other than the mouth, especially the rectum or vagina.

N

Large Volume Parenteral >=100 ml

Single dose solutions, 100 ml or greater. Parenteral means the product is taken into the body or administered in a manner other than through the digestive tract, such as by intravenous or intramuscular injection.

O

Sterile Ointment

Sterile ointments are free from live bacteria or other microorganisms.

P

Small Volume Parenteral <100ml

Less than 100 ml. Includes emulsion solutions, repository suspensions, dry solid, and sterile bulk powders for solution or suspension

Q

Aerosol Dispersed Medication

Foam, powder, spray, nebulizers (excludes products packaged in non-metered mechanical dispensers – e.g., nasal sprays).

R

Non-sterile Powder

Effervescent for reconstitution (oral use) Topical (excludes aerosols and bulk pharmaceutical chemicals).

S

Bulk Pharmaceutical

 

T

Dried – Natural or Artificial

Dried products may be dried naturally or using heat, cold, or chemicals.

V

Compressed Medical Gas

Any gas for medicinal use.

W

Cultured or Cured

Cultured or Cured includes products that are cultured, fermented, salted, pickled, smoke cured, or sugar cured, as well as products that have undergone an enzymatic reaction.

X

Block or Bolus Premix

Premix, dry; Premix, liquid; mineral or salt mixture block

Bolus: enteric coated: immediate action, sustained action

Bolus: uncoated or plain coated: immediate action, sustained action. Bolus is a large pill; used especially in veterinary medicine.

Y

NEC

Not Elsewhere Classified

Z

Sterile Powder

Sterile powders (excludes those used for small volume parenterals).


Back to Vitamin and Mineral Index  

Check Your Knowledge

1. Iron tablets would be coded under which of the following classes?


Answer  

2. You are coding Vitamin E tablets. The label says the product "contributes to a healthy heart." Under suggested use, the manufacturer states: " As a dietary supplement, take one soft gel capsule daily, preferably with a meal." Which of the following subclasses would you choose for this product?


Answer  

3. Which of the following Process Indicator Codes would you choose for a product labeled "Ginkgo Biloba Extract – 60 mg, Size: 60 soft cap"


Answer  
Back to Vitamin and Mineral Index

   Code the Products

Now you will have a chance to practice coding some Vitamin, Mineral, Protein, and Unconventional Dietary Specialty Products. Below you will find five product descriptions. Read the descriptions and then click on the PCB Application button below. This will take you to the Product Code Builder application.

Have notepaper and a pen or pencil handy. As you code each product, jot down the product code result. When you're ready to check your answers, click the Tutorial button on the Taskbar. The Taskbar is located at the bottom of the screen. This will bring you back here. Caution: Don't click the Tutorial button in the Product Code Builder application, it will take you to the beginning of the Tutorial.

1. MULTIVITAMIN GEL CAPS (DIETARY SUPPLEMENT) containing the active ingredients: Vitamins A, D, & E (reveal code)

2. ECHINACEA HERBAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENT 100CAP, 450 MG EA (reveal code)

3. GINSENG TEA (reveal code)

4. VITAMIN E SOFT GEL CAPSULES, ANIMAL USE (reveal code)

5. EVENING PRIMROSE OIL, 90 softgels, label claim: May prevent Fibrocystic Breast Disease (FBD) if taken regularly. (reveal code)

Check your answers - Click on reveal code for each product description to reveal the correct product code. Compare it with the one you got. Did you get the correct code? If not, determine which element was incorrect. You can go back the product code builder application and try again.

Back to Vitamin and Mineral Index

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