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J Infect Dis 2004 Jan 15;189(2):254-7

Induction of cellular and humoral immunity after aerosol or subcutaneous administration of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine as a primary dose to 12-month-old children.

Wong-Chew RM, Islas-Romero R, Garcia-Garcia Mde L, Beeler JA, Audet S, Santos-Preciado JI, Gans H, Lew-Yasukawa L, Maldonado YA, Arvin AM, Valdespino-Gomez JL

Wong-Chew RM, UNAM, Fac Med, Dept Expt Med, Dr Balmis 148,Colonia Doctores, Mexico City 06726, DF, Mexico UNAM, Fac Med, Dept Expt Med, Mexico City 06726, DF, Mexico Ctr Nacl Salud Infancia & Adolescencia, Secretaria Salud, Mexico City, DF, Mexico Inst Nacl Salud Publ, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA US FDA, Rockville, MD 20857 USA


Infants were immunized by aerosol (10(3.6) plaque-forming units [pfu]/dose) or subcutaneous (sc) (10(4.27) pfu/dose) administration of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine. Measles-specific T cell proliferative responses with a stimulation index of > or =3 developed in 72% of children given aerosol-administered vaccine, compared with 87% given s.c.-administered vaccine (P =.06). Seroconversion rates were 90% after aerosol-administered vaccine and 100% after s.c.-administered vaccine (P=.01), and measles geometric mean titers were 237 milli-international units (mIU) (95% confidence interval [CI], 146-385 mIU) and 487 mIU (95% CI, 390-609 mIU) in each group, respectively (P=.01). Measles-specific T and B cell responses were weaker after aerosol than after sc vaccination, indicating a need to use a higher aerosol dose to achieve optimal immunogenicity.

Category: Journal Article, Peer
PubMed ID: #14722890
Includes FDA Authors from Scientific Area(s): Biologics
Entry Created: 2011-10-04 Entry Last Modified: 2012-08-29