Drug Safety-related Labeling Changes (SrLC)

Get Email Alerts | Guide

LANTUS (BLA-021081)

(INSULIN GLARGINE RECOMBINANT)

Safety-related Labeling Changes Approved by FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)

Download Data

Expand all

11/15/2019 (SUPPL-74)

Approved Drug Label (PDF)

5 Warnings and Precautions

5.2 Hyperglycemia or Hypoglycemia with Changes in Insulin Regimen

Additions and/or revisions underlined:

Changes in an insulin regimen (e.g., insulin, insulin strength, manufacturer, type, injection site or method of administration) may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Repeated insulin injections into areas of lipodystrophy or localized cutaneous amyloidosis have been reported to result in hyperglycemia; a sudden change in the injection site (to unaffected area) has been reported to result in hypoglycemia.

Make any changes to a patient’s insulin regimen under close medical supervision with increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring. Advise patients who have repeatedly injected into areas of lipodystrophy or localized cutaneous amyloidosis to change the injection site to unaffected areas and closely monitor for hypoglycemia. For patients with type 2 diabetes, dosage adjustments in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment may be needed.

6 Adverse Reactions

6.3 Postmarketing Experience

Newly added information to the end of the subsection:

Localized cutaneous amyloidosis at the injection site has occurred. Hyperglycemia has been reported with repeated insulin injections into areas of localized cutaneous amyloidosis; hypoglycemia has been reported with a sudden change to an unaffected injection site.

17 PCI/PI/MG (Patient Counseling Information/Patient Information/Medication Guide)

PATIENT INFORMATION

How should I use LANTUS?

Additions and/or revisions underlined:

LANTUS is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) of your upper legs (thighs), upper arms, or

stomach area (abdomen).

Change (rotate) injection sites within the area you chose with each dose to reduce your risk of getting lipodystrophy (pits in skin or thickened skin) and localized cutaneous amyloidosis (skin with lumps) at the injection sites.

  • Do not use the exact same spot for each injection.

  • Do not inject where the skin has pits,or has lumps.

  • Do not inject where the skin is tender, bruised, scaly or hard, or into scars or damaged skin.

05/09/2019 (SUPPL-72)

Approved Drug Label (PDF)

8 Use in Specific Populations

8.1 Pregnancy

(Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR) Conversion; Additions and/or revisions are underlined)

Risk Summary

Published studies with use of insulin glargine during pregnancy have not reported a clear association with insulin glargine and adverse developmental outcomes. There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with poorly controlled diabetes in pregnancy.

Rats and rabbits were exposed to insulin glargine in animal reproduction studies during organogenesis, respectively 50 times and 10 times the human subcutaneous dose of 0.2 units/kg/day. Overall, the effects of insulin glargine did not generally differ from those observed with regular human insulin.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects is 6% to 10% in women with pregestational diabetes with an HbA1c >7 and has been reported to be as high as 20% to 25% in women with a HbA1c >10. The estimated background risk of miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk

Poorly controlled diabetes in pregnancy increases the maternal risk for diabetic ketoacidosis, preeclampsia, spontaneous abortions, preterm delivery, and delivery complications. Poorly controlled diabetes increases the fetal risk for major birth defects, stillbirth, and macrosomia- related morbidity.

Data Human data

Published data do not report a clear association with insulin glargine and major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes when insulin glargine is used during pregnancy. However, these studies cannot definitely establish the absence of any risk because of methodological limitations including small sample size and some lacking comparator groups.

Animal data

Subcutaneous reproduction and teratology studies have been performed with insulin glargine and regular human insulin in rats and Himalayan rabbits. Insulin glargine was given to female rats before mating, during mating, and throughout pregnancy at doses up to 0.36 mg/kg/day, which is approximately 50 times the recommended human subcutaneous starting dose of 0.2 units/kg/day (0.007 mg/kg/day), on a mg/kg basis. In rabbits, doses of 0.072 mg/kg/day, which is approximately 10 times the recommended human subcutaneous starting dose of 0.2 units/kg/day on a mg/kg basis, were administered during organogenesis. The effects of insulin glargine did not generally differ from those observed with regular human insulin in rats or rabbits. However, in rabbits, five fetuses from two litters of the high-dose group exhibited dilation of the cerebral ventricles. Fertility and early embryonic development appeared normal.

8.2 Lactation

(Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR) Conversion; Additions and/or revisions are underlined)

Risk Summary

There are either no or only limited data on the presence of insulin glargine in human milk, the effects on breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Endogenous insulin is present in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for LANTUS, and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from LANTUS or from the underlying maternal condition.

17 PCI/PI/MG (Patient Counseling Information/Patient Information/Medication Guide)

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

(Additions and/or revisions are underlined)

Advise patients that changes in insulin regimen can predispose to hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia and that changes in insulin regimen should be made under close medical supervision.

Questions related to the drug data in these files should be directed to the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Division of Drug Information
druginfo@fda.hhs.gov.

Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players.
Language Assistance Available: Español | 繁體中文 | Tiếng Việt | 한국어 | Tagalog | Русский | العربية | Kreyòl Ayisyen | Français | Polski | Português | Italiano | Deutsch | 日本語 | فارسی | English