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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

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The information on this page is current as of April 1 2020.

For the most up-to-date version of CFR Title 21, go to the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (eCFR).

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Help | More About 21CFR
[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 8]
[Revised as of April 1, 2020]
[CITE: 21CFR890.3690]
See Related Information on Powered wheeled stretcher. in CDRH databases



TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
SUBCHAPTER H - MEDICAL DEVICES

PART 890 -- PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES

Subpart D - Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices

Sec. 890.3690 Powered wheeled stretcher.

(a) Identification. A powered wheeled stretcher is a battery-powered table with wheels that is intended for medical purposes for use by patients who are unable to propel themselves independently and who must maintain a prone or supine position for prolonged periods because of skin ulcers or contractures (muscle contractions).

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). The powered wheeled stretcher is exempt from premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter, subject to § 890.9, and the following conditions for exemption:

(1) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing must demonstrate that the safety controls are adequate to ensure safe use of the device and prevent user falls from the device in the event of a device failure;

(2) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing must demonstrate the ability of the device to withstand the rated user weight load with an appropriate factor of safety;

(3) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing must demonstrate the longevity of the device to withstand external forces applied to the device and provide the user with an expected service life of the device;

(4) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing must demonstrate proper environments of use and storage of the device to maximize the longevity of the device;

(5) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing (such as outlined in appropriate FDA-recognized consensus standards) must validate electromagnetic compatibility and electrical safety;

(6) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing (such as outlined in appropriate FDA-recognized consensus standards) must validate that the skin-contacting components of the device are biocompatible;

(7) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing (such as outlined in appropriate FDA-recognized consensus standards) must validate the software life cycle and that all processes, activities, and tasks are implemented and documented;

(8) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing must validate that the device components are found to be nonflammable;

(9) Appropriate analysis and nonclinical testing (such as outlined in appropriate FDA-recognized consensus standards) must validate that the battery in the device performs as intended over the anticipated service life of the device;

(10) Adequate labeling is provided to the user to document proper use and maintenance of the device to ensure safe use of the device in the intended use environment; and

(11) Appropriate risk assessment including, but not limited to, evaluating the dimensional limits of the gaps in hospital beds, and mitigation strategy to reduce entrapment.

[48 FR 53047, Nov. 23, 1983, as amended at 85 FR 2020, Jan. 14, 2020]

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