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CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

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[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 1]
[Revised as of April 1, 2017]
[CITE: 21CFR1]





TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
SUBCHAPTER A--GENERAL
 
PART 1GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS
 

Subpart J--Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records

 General Provisions

Sec. 1.326 Who is subject to this subpart?

(a) Persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import food in the United States are subject to the regulations in this subpart, unless you qualify for one of the exclusions in 1.327. If you conduct more than one type of activity at a location, you are required to keep records with respect to those activities covered by this subpart, but are not required by this subpart to keep records with respect to activities that fall within one of the exclusions in 1.327.

(b) Persons subject to the regulations in this subpart must keep records whether or not the food is being offered for or enters interstate commerce.

Sec. 1.327 Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

(a) Farms are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart.

(b) Restaurants are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. A restaurant/retail facility is excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart if its sales of food it prepares and sells to consumers for immediate consumption are more than 90 percent of its total food sales.

(c) Fishing vessels, including those that not only harvest and transport fish but also engage in practices such as heading, eviscerating, or freezing intended solely to prepare fish for holding on board a harvest vessel, are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart, except 1.361 and 1.363. However, those fishing vessels otherwise engaged in processing fish are subject to all of the requirements in this subpart. For the purposes of this section, "processing" means handling, storing, preparing, shucking, changing into different market forms, manufacturing, preserving, packing, labeling, dockside unloading, holding or heading, eviscerating, or freezing other than solely to prepare fish for holding on board a harvest vessel.

(d) Persons who distribute food directly to consumers are excluded from the requirements in 1.345 to establish and maintain records to identify the nontransporter and transporter immediate subsequent recipients as to those transactions. The term "consumers" does not include businesses.

(e) Persons who operate retail food establishments that distribute food to persons who are not consumers are subject to all of the requirements in this subpart. However, the requirements in 1.345 to establish and maintain records to identify the nontransporter and transporter immediate subsequent recipients that are not consumers applies as to those transactions only to the extent the information is reasonably available.

(1) For purposes of this section, retail food establishment is defined to mean an establishment that sells food products directly to consumers as its primary function. The term "consumers" does not include businesses.

(2) A retail food establishment may manufacture/process, pack, or hold food if the establishment's primary function is to sell from that establishment food, including food that it manufactures/processes, packs, or holds, directly to consumers.

(3) A retail food establishment's primary function is to sell food directly to consumers if the annual monetary value of sales of food products directly to consumers exceeds the annual monetary value of sales of food products to all other buyers.

(4) A "retail food establishment" includes grocery stores, convenience stores, and vending machine locations.

(f) Retail food establishments that employ 10 or fewer full-time equivalent employees are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart, except 1.361 and 1.363. The exclusion is based on the number of full-time equivalent employees at each retail food establishment and not the entire business, which may own numerous retail stores.

(g) Persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import food in the United States that is within the exclusive jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) under the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq. ), the Poultry Products Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 451 et seq. ), or the Egg Products Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 1031 et seq. ) are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart with respect to that food while it is under the exclusive jurisdiction of USDA.

(h) Foreign persons, except for foreign persons who transport food in the United States, are excluded from all of the requirements of this subpart.

(i) Persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import food are subject to 1.361 and 1.363 with respect to its packaging (the outer packaging of food that bears the label and does not contact the food). All other persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import packaging are excluded from all of the requirements of this subpart.

(j) Persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import food contact substances other than the finished container that directly contacts food are excluded from all of the requirements of this subpart, except 1.361 and 1.363.

(k) Persons who place food directly in contact with its finished container are subject to all of the requirements of this subpart as to the finished container that directly contacts that food. All other persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import the finished container that directly contacts the food are excluded from the requirements of this subpart as to the finished container, except 1.361 and 1.363.

(l) Nonprofit food establishments are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart, except 1.361 and 1.363.

(m) Persons who manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, or import food for personal consumption are excluded from all of the requirements of this subpart.

(n) Persons who receive or hold food on behalf of specific individual consumers and who are not also parties to the transaction and who are not in the business of distributing food are excluded from all of the requirements of this subpart.

Sec. 1.328 What definitions apply to this subpart?

The definitions of terms in section 201 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) (21 U.S.C. 321) apply to such terms when used in this subpart. In addition, for the purposes of this subpart:

Farm means:

(1) Primary production farm. A primary production farm is an operation under one management in one general (but not necessarily contiguous) physical location devoted to the growing of crops, the harvesting of crops, the raising of animals (including seafood), or any combination of these activities. The term "farm" includes operations that, in addition to these activities:

(i) Pack or hold raw agricultural commodities;

(ii) Pack or hold processed food, provided that all processed food used in such activities is either consumed on that farm or another farm under the same management, or is processed food identified in paragraph (1)(iii)(B)(1 ) of this definition; and

(iii) Manufacture/process food, provided that:

(A) All food used in such activities is consumed on that farm or another farm under the same management; or

(B) Any manufacturing/processing of food that is not consumed on that farm or another farm under the same management consists only of:

(1 ) Drying/dehydrating raw agricultural commodities to create a distinct commodity (such as drying/dehydrating grapes to produce raisins), and packaging and labeling such commodities, without additional manufacturing/processing (an example of additional manufacturing/processing is slicing);

(2 ) Treatment to manipulate the ripening of raw agricultural commodities (such as by treating produce with ethylene gas), and packaging and labeling treated raw agricultural commodities, without additional manufacturing/processing; and

(3 ) Packaging and labeling raw agricultural commodities, when these activities do not involve additional manufacturing/processing (an example of additional manufacturing/processing is irradiation); or

(2) Secondary activities farm. A secondary activities farm is an operation, not located on a primary production farm, devoted to harvesting (such as hulling or shelling), packing, and/or holding of raw agricultural commodities, provided that the primary production farm(s) that grows, harvests, and/or raises the majority of the raw agricultural commodities harvested, packed, and/or held by the secondary activities farm owns, or jointly owns, a majority interest in the secondary activities farm. A secondary activities farm may also conduct those additional activities allowed on a primary production farm as described in paragraphs (1)(ii) and (iii) of this definition.

Food has the meaning given in section 201(f) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Examples of food include, but are not limited to fruits; vegetables; fish; dairy products; eggs; raw agricultural commodities for use as food or as components of food; animal feed, including pet food; food and feed ingredients and additives, including substances that migrate into food from the finished container and other articles that contact food; dietary supplements and dietary ingredients; infant formula; beverages, including alcoholic beverages and bottled water; live food animals; bakery goods; snack foods; candy; and canned foods.

Full-time equivalent employee means all individuals employed by the person claiming the exemption. The number of full-time equivalent employees is determined by dividing the total number of hours of salary or wages paid directly to employees of the person and of all of its affiliates by the number of hours of work in 1 year, 2,080 hours (i.e., 40 hours * 52 weeks).

Harvesting applies to farms and farm mixed-type facilities and means activities that are traditionally performed on farms for the purpose of removing raw agricultural commodities from the place they were grown or raised and preparing them for use as food. Harvesting is limited to activities performed on raw agricultural commodities, or on processed foods created by drying/dehydrating a raw agricultural commodity without additional manufacturing/processing, on a farm. Harvesting does not include activities that transform a raw agricultural commodity into a processed food as defined in section 201(gg) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Examples of harvesting include cutting (or otherwise separating) the edible portion of the raw agricultural commodity from the crop plant and removing or trimming part of the raw agricultural commodity (e.g., foliage, husks, roots, or stems). Examples of harvesting also include cooling, field coring, filtering, gathering, hulling, shelling, sifting, threshing, trimming of outer leaves of, and washing raw agricultural commodities grown on a farm.

Holding means storage of food and also includes activities performed incidental to storage of a food (e.g., activities performed for the safe or effective storage of that food, such as fumigating food during storage, and drying/dehydrating raw agricultural commodities when the drying/dehydrating does not create a distinct commodity (such as drying/dehydrating hay or alfalfa)). Holding also includes activities performed as a practical necessity for the distribution of that food (such as blending of the same raw agricultural commodity and breaking down pallets), but does not include activities that transform a raw agricultural commodity into a processed food as defined in section 201(gg) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Holding facilities could include warehouses, cold storage facilities, storage silos, grain elevators, and liquid storage tanks.

Manufacturing/processing means making food from one or more ingredients, or synthesizing, preparing, treating, modifying or manipulating food, including food crops or ingredients. Examples of manufacturing/processing activities include: Baking, boiling, bottling, canning, cooking, cooling, cutting, distilling, drying/dehydrating raw agricultural commodities to create a distinct commodity (such as drying/dehydrating grapes to produce raisins), evaporating, eviscerating, extracting juice, formulating, freezing, grinding, homogenizing, irradiating, labeling, milling, mixing, packaging (including modified atmosphere packaging), pasteurizing, peeling, rendering, treating to manipulate ripening, trimming, washing, or waxing. For farms and farm mixed-type facilities, manufacturing/processing does not include activities that are part of harvesting, packing, or holding.

Mixed-type facility means an establishment that engages in both activities that are exempt from registration under section 415 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and activities that require the establishment to be registered. An example of such a facility is a "farm mixed-type facility," which is an establishment that is a farm, but also conducts activities outside the farm definition that require the establishment to be registered.

Nonprofit food establishment means a charitable entity that prepares or serves food directly to the consumer or otherwise provides food or meals for consumption by humans or animals in the United States. The term includes central food banks, soup kitchens, and nonprofit food delivery services. To be considered a nonprofit food establishment, the establishment must meet the terms of section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3)).

Nontransporter means a person who owns food or who holds, manufactures, processes, packs, imports, receives, or distributes food for purposes other than transportation.

Nontransporter immediate previous source means a person that last had food before transferring it to another nontransporter.

Nontransporter immediate subsequent recipient means a nontransporter that acquires food from another nontransporter.

Packaging (when used as a noun) means the outer packaging of food that bears the label and does not contact the food. Packaging does not include food contact substances as they are defined in section 409(h)(6) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

Packaging (when used as a verb) means placing food into a container that directly contacts the food and that the consumer receives.

Packing means placing food into a container other than packaging the food and also includes re-packing and activities performed incidental to packing or re-packing a food (e.g., activities performed for the safe or effective packing or re-packing of that food (such as sorting, culling, grading, and weighing or conveying incidental to packing or re-packing)), but does not include activities that transform a raw agricultural commodity, as defined in section 201(r) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, into a processed food as defined in section 201(gg) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

Person includes individual, partnership, corporation, and association.

Recipe means the formula, including ingredients, quantities, and instructions, necessary to manufacture a food product. Because a recipe must have all three elements, a list of the ingredients used to manufacture a product without quantity information and manufacturing instructions is not a recipe.

Restaurant means a facility that prepares and sells food directly to consumers for immediate consumption. "Restaurant" does not include facilities that provide food to interstate conveyances, central kitchens, and other similar facilities that do not prepare and serve food directly to consumers.

(1) Facilities in which food is directly provided to humans, such as cafeterias, lunchrooms, cafes, bistros, fast food establishments, food stands, saloons, taverns, bars, lounges, catering facilities, hospital kitchens, day care kitchens, and nursing home kitchens, are restaurants.

(2) Pet shelters, kennels, and veterinary facilities in which food is directly provided to animals are restaurants.

Transporter means a person who has possession, custody, or control of an article of food in the United States for the sole purpose of transporting the food, whether by road, rail, water, or air. Transporter also includes a foreign person that transports food in the United States, regardless of whether that foreign person has possession, custody, or control of that food for the sole purpose of transporting that food.

Transporter's immediate previous source means a person from whom a transporter received food. This source can be either another transporter or a nontransporter.

Transporter's immediate subsequent recipient means a person to whom a transporter delivered food. This recipient can be either another transporter or a nontransporter.

You means a person subject to this subpart under 1.326.

[69 FR 71651, Dec. 9, 2004, as amended at 80 FR 56143, Sept. 17, 2015; 81 FR 3715, Jan. 22, 2016]

Sec. 1.329 Do other statutory provisions and regulations apply?

(a) In addition to the regulations in this subpart, you must comply with all other applicable statutory provisions and regulations related to the establishment and maintenance of records for foods except as described in paragraph (b) of this section. For example, the regulations in this subpart are in addition to existing recordkeeping regulations for low acid canned foods, juice, seafood, infant formula, color additives, bottled water, animal feed, and medicated animal feed.

(b) Records established or maintained to satisfy the requirements of this subpart that meet the definition of electronic records in 11.3(b)(6) (21 CFR 11.3 (b)(6)) of this chapter are exempt from the requirements of part 11 of this chapter. Records that satisfy the requirements of this subpart but that are also required under other applicable statutory provisions or regulations remain subject to part 11 of this chapter.

Sec. 1.330 Can existing records satisfy the requirements of this subpart?

The regulations in this subpart do not require duplication of existing records if those records contain all of the information required by this subpart. If a covered person keeps records of all of the information as required by this subpart to comply with other Federal, State, or local regulations, or for any other reason, then those records may be used to meet these requirements. Moreover, persons do not have to keep all of the information required by this rule in one set of records. If they have records containing some of the required information, they may keep those existing records and keep, either separately or in a combined form, any new information required by this rule. There is no obligation to create an entirely new record or compilation of records containing both existing and new information, even if the records containing some of the required information were not created at the time the food was received or released.

 Requirements for Nontransporters To Establish and Maintain Records To Identify the Nontransporter and Transporter Immediate Previous Sources of Food

Sec. 1.337 What information must nontransporters establish and maintain to identify the nontransporter and transporter immediate previous sources of food?

(a) If you are a nontransporter, you must establish and maintain the following records for all food you receive:

(1) The name of the firm, address, telephone number and, if available, the fax number and e-mail address of the nontransporter immediate previous source, whether domestic or foreign;

(2) An adequate description of the type of food received, to include brand name and specific variety (e.g., brand x cheddar cheese, not just cheese; or romaine lettuce, not just lettuce);

(3) The date you received the food;

(4) For persons who manufacture, process, or pack food, the lot or code number or other identifier of the food (to the extent this information exists);

(5) The quantity and how the food is packaged (e.g., 6 count bunches, 25 pound (lb) carton, 12 ounce (oz) bottle, 100 gallon (gal) tank); and

(6) The name of the firm, address, telephone number, and, if available, the fax number and e-mail address of the transporter immediate previous source (the transporter who transported the food to you).

 Requirements for Nontransporters To Establish and Maintain Records To Identify the Nontransporter and Transporter Immediate Subsequent Recipients of Food

Sec. 1.345 What information must nontransporters establish and maintain to identify the nontransporter and transporter immediate subsequent recipients of food?

(a) If you are a nontransporter, you must establish and maintain the following records for food you release:

(1) The name of the firm, address, telephone number, and, if available, the fax number and e-mail address of the nontransporter immediate subsequent recipient, whether domestic or foreign;

(2) An adequate description of the type of food released, to include brand name and specific variety (e.g., brand x cheddar cheese, not just cheese; or romaine lettuce, not just lettuce);

(3) The date you released the food;

(4) For persons who manufacture, process, or pack food, the lot or code number or other identifier of the food (to the extent this information exists);

(5) The quantity and how the food is packaged (e.g., 6 count bunches, 25 lb carton, 12 oz bottle, 100 gal tank);

(6) The name of the firm, address, telephone number, and, if available, the fax number and e-mail address of the transporter immediate subsequent recipient (the transporter who transported the food from you); and

(b) Your records must include information reasonably available to you to identify the specific source of each ingredient used to make every lot of finished product.

 Requirements for Transporters To Establish and Maintain Records

Sec. 1.352 What information must transporters establish and maintain?

If you are a transporter, you must establish and maintain the following records for each food you transport in the United States. You may fulfill this requirement by either:

(a) Establishing and maintaining the following records:

(1) Names of the transporter's immediate previous source and transporter's immediate subsequent recipient;

(2) Origin and destination points;

(3) Date shipment received and date released;

(4) Number of packages;

(5) Description of freight;

(6) Route of movement during the time you transported the food; and

(7) Transfer point(s) through which shipment moved; or

(b) Establishing and maintaining records containing the following information currently required by the Department of Transportation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (of roadway interstate transporters (49 CFR 373.101 and 373.103) as of December 9, 2004:

(1) Names of consignor and consignee;

(2) Origin and destination points;

(3) Date of shipment;

(4) Number of packages;

(5) Description of freight;

(6) Route of movement and name of each carrier participating in the transportation; and

(7) Transfer points through which shipment moved; or

(c) Establishing and maintaining records containing the following information currently required by the Department of Transportation's Surface Transportation Board of rail and water interstate transporters (49 CFR 1035.1 and 1035.2) as of December 9, 2004:

(1) Date received;

(2) Received from;

(3) Consigned to;

(4) Destination;

(5) State of;

(6) County of;

(7) Route;

(8) Delivering carrier;

(9) Car initial;

(10) Car no;

(11) Trailer initials/number;

(12) Container initials/number;

(13) No. packages; and

(14) Description of articles; or

(d) Establishing and maintaining records containing the following information currently required by the Warsaw Convention of international air transporters on air waybills:

(1) Shipper's name and address;

(2) Consignee's name and address;

(3) Customs reference/status;

(4) Airport of departure and destination;

(5) First carrier; and

(6) Description of goods; or

(e) Entering into an agreement with the nontransporter immediate previous source located in the United States and/or the nontransporter immediate subsequent recipient located in the United States to establish, maintain, or establish and maintain, the information in 1.352(a), (b), (c), or (d). The agreement must contain the following elements:

(1) Effective date;

(2) Printed names and signatures of authorized officials;

(3) Description of the records to be established and/or maintained;

(4) Provision for the records to be maintained in compliance with 1.360, if the agreement provides for maintenance of records;

(5) Provision for the records to be available to FDA as required by 1.361, if the agreement provides for maintenance of records;

(6) Acknowledgement that the nontransporter assumes legal responsibility under 1.363 for establishing and/or maintaining the records as required by this subpart; and

(7) Provision that if the agreement is terminated in writing by either party, responsibility for compliance with the applicable establishment, maintenance, and access provisions of this subpart reverts to the transporter as of the date of termination.

 General Requirements

Sec. 1.360 What are the record retention requirements?

(a) You must create the required records when you receive and release food, except to the extent that the information is contained in existing records.

(b) If you are a nontransporter, you must retain for 6 months after the dates you receive and release the food all required records for any food having a significant risk of spoilage, loss of value, or loss of palatability within 60 days after the date you receive or release the food.

(c) If you are a nontransporter, you must retain for 1 year after the dates you receive and release the food all required records for any food for which a significant risk of spoilage, loss of value, or loss of palatability occurs only after a minimum of 60 days, but within 6 months, after the date you receive or release the food.

(d) If you are a nontransporter, you must retain for 2 years after the dates you receive and release the food all required records for any food for which a significant risk of spoilage, loss of value, or loss of palatability does not occur sooner than 6 months after the date you receive or release the food, including foods preserved by freezing, dehydrating, or being placed in a hermetically sealed container.

(e) If you are a nontransporter, you must retain for 1 year after the dates you receive and release the food all required records for animal food, including pet food.

(f) If you are a transporter or nontransporter retaining records on behalf of a transporter, you must retain for 6 months after the dates you receive and release the food all required records for any food having a significant risk of spoilage, loss of value, or loss of palatability within 60 days after the date the transporter receives or releases the food. If you are a transporter, or nontransporter retaining records on behalf of a transporter, you must retain for 1 year after the dates you receive and release the food, all required records for any food for which a significant risk of spoilage, loss of value, or loss of palatability occurs only after a minimum of 60 days after the date the transporter receives or releases the food.

(g) You must retain all records at the establishment where the covered activities described in the records occurred (onsite) or at a reasonably accessible location.

(h) The maintenance of electronic records is acceptable. Electronic records are considered to be onsite if they are accessible from an onsite location.

Sec. 1.361 What are the record availability requirements?

When FDA has a reasonable belief that an article of food, and any other article of food that FDA reasonably believes is likely to be affected in a similar manner, is adulterated and presents a threat of serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals, or when FDA believes that there is a reasonable probability that the use of or exposure to an article of food, and any other article of food that FDA reasonably believes is likely to be affected in a similar manner, will cause serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals, any records and other information accessible to FDA under section 414 or 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 350c and 374(a)) must be made readily available for inspection and photocopying or other means of reproduction. Such records and other information must be made available as soon as possible, not to exceed 24 hours from the time of receipt of the official request, from an officer or employee duly designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services who presents appropriate credentials and a written notice.

[77 FR 10662, Feb. 23, 2012]

Sec. 1.362 What records are excluded from this subpart?

The establishment and maintenance of records as required by this subpart does not extend to recipes for food as defined in 1.328; financial data, pricing data, personnel data, research data, or sales data (other than shipment data regarding sales).

Sec. 1.363 What are the consequences of failing to establish or maintain records or make them available to FDA as required by this subpart?

(a) The failure to establish or maintain records as required by section 414(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and this regulation or the refusal to permit access to or verification or copying of any such required record is a prohibited act under section 301 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(b) The failure of a nontransporter immediate previous source or a nontransporter immediate subsequent recipient who enters an agreement under 1.352(e) to establish, maintain, or establish and maintain, records required under 1.352(a), (b), (c), or (d), or the refusal to permit access to or verification or copying of any such required record, is a prohibited act under section 301 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(c) The failure of any person to make records or other information available to FDA as required by section 414 or 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and this regulation is a prohibited act under section 301 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

[80 FR 56144, Sept. 17, 2015

 Compliance Dates

Sec. 1.368 What are the compliance dates for this subpart?

The compliance date for the requirements in this subpart is December 9, 2005. However, the compliance dates for small and very small businesses are contained in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. The size of the business is determined using the total number of full-time equivalent employees in the entire business, not each individual location or establishment. A full-time employee counts as one full-time equivalent employee. Two part-time employees, each working half time, count as one full-time equivalent employee.

(a) The compliance date for the requirements in this subpart is June 9, 2006, for small businesses employing fewer that 500, but more than 10 full-time equivalent employees.

(b) The compliance date for the requirements in this subpart is December 11, 2006, for very small businesses that employ 10 or fewer full-time equivalent employees.

[69 FR 71651, Dec. 9, 2004, as amended at 70 FR 8727, Feb. 23, 2005]

Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1333, 1453, 1454, 1455, 4402; 19 U.S.C. 1490, 1491; 21 U.S.C. 321, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335a, 342, 343, 350c, 350d, 350e, 350j, 350k, 352, 355, 360b, 360ccc, 360ccc-1, 360ccc-2, 362, 371, 373, 374, 379j-31, 381, 382, 384a, 384b, 384d, 387, 387a, 387c, 393; 42 U.S.C. 216, 241, 243, 262, 264, 271; Pub. L. 107-188, 116 Stat. 594, 668-69; Pub. L. 111-353, 124 Stat. 3885, 3889.
Source: 42 FR 15553, Mar. 22, 1977, unless otherwise noted.

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