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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

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[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 5]
[Revised as of April 1, 2017]
[CITE: 21CFR314]





TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
SUBCHAPTER D--DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE
 
PART 314APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG
 

Subpart D--FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications

Sec. 314.100 Timeframes for reviewing applications and abbreviated applications.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, within 180 days of receipt of an application for a new drug under section 505(b) of the act or an abbreviated application for a new drug under section 505(j) of the act, FDA will review it and send the applicant either an approval letter under 314.105 or a complete response letter under 314.110. This 180-day period is called the "initial review cycle."

(b) At any time before approval, an applicant may withdraw an application under 314.65 or an abbreviated application under 314.99 and later submit it again for consideration.

(c) The initial review cycle may be adjusted by mutual agreement between FDA and an applicant or as provided in 314.60 and 314.96, as the result of a major amendment.

[73 FR 39609, July 10, 2008]

Sec. 314.101 Filing an NDA and receiving an ANDA.

(a) Filing an NDA. (1) Within 60 days after FDA receives an NDA, the Agency will determine whether the NDA may be filed. The filing of an NDA means that FDA has made a threshold determination that the NDA is sufficiently complete to permit a substantive review.

(2) If FDA finds that none of the reasons in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section for refusing to file the NDA apply, the Agency will file the NDA and notify the applicant in writing. In the case of a 505(b)(2) application that contains a paragraph IV certification, the applicant will be notified via a paragraph IV acknowledgment letter. The date of filing will be the date 60 days after the date FDA received the NDA. The date of filing begins the 180-day period described in section 505(c) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. This 180-day period is called the "filing clock."

(3) If FDA refuses to file the NDA, the Agency will notify the applicant in writing and state the reason under paragraph (d) or (e) of this section for the refusal. If FDA refuses to file the NDA under paragraph (d) of this section, the applicant may request in writing within 30 days of the date of the Agency's notification an informal conference with the Agency about whether the Agency should file the NDA. If, following the informal conference, the applicant requests that FDA file the NDA (with or without amendments to correct the deficiencies), the Agency will file the NDA over protest under paragraph (a)(2) of this section, notify the applicant in writing, and review it as filed. If the NDA is filed over protest, the date of filing will be the date 60 days after the date the applicant requested the informal conference. The applicant need not resubmit a copy of an NDA that is filed over protest. If FDA refuses to file the NDA under paragraph (e) of this section, the applicant may amend the NDA and resubmit it, and the Agency will make a determination under this section whether it may be filed.

(b)(1) Receiving an ANDA. An ANDA will be evaluated after it is submitted to determine whether the ANDA may be received. Receipt of an ANDA means that FDA has made a threshold determination that the abbreviated application is substantially complete.

(2) If FDA finds that none of the reasons in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section for considering the ANDA not to have been received applies, the ANDA is substantially complete and the Agency will receive the ANDA and notify the applicant in writing. If FDA determines, upon evaluation, that an ANDA was substantially complete as of the date it was submitted to FDA, FDA will consider the ANDA to have been received as of the date of submission. In the case of an ANDA that contains a paragraph IV certification, the applicant will be notified via a paragraph IV acknowledgment letter.

(3) If FDA considers the ANDA not to have been received under paragraph (d) or (e) of this section, FDA will notify the applicant of the refuse-to-receive decision. The applicant may then:

(i) Withdraw the ANDA under 314.99; or

(ii) Correct the deficiencies and resubmit the ANDA; or

(iii) Take no action, in which case FDA may consider the ANDA withdrawn after 1 year.

(c) [Reserved]

(d) NDA or ANDA deficiencies. FDA may refuse to file an NDA or may not consider an ANDA to be received if any of the following applies:

(1) The NDA or ANDA does not contain a completed application form.

(2) The NDA or ANDA is not submitted in the form required under 314.50 or 314.94.

(3) The NDA or ANDA is incomplete because it does not on its face contain information required under section 505(b) or section 505(j) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 314.50 or 314.94. In determining whether an ANDA is incomplete on its face, FDA will consider the nature (e.g., major or minor) of the deficiencies, including the number of deficiencies in the ANDA.

(4) The applicant fails to submit a complete environmental assessment, which addresses each of the items specified in the applicable format under 25.40 of this chapter or fails to provide sufficient information to establish that the requested action is subject to categorical exclusion under 25.30 or 25.31 of this chapter.

(5) The NDA or ANDA does not contain an accurate and complete English translation of each part of the NDA or ANDA that is not in English.

(6) The NDA or ANDA does not contain a statement for each nonclinical laboratory study that the study was conducted in compliance with the requirements set forth in part 58 of this chapter, or, for each study not conducted in compliance with part 58 of this chapter, a brief statement of the reason for the noncompliance.

(7) The NDA or ANDA does not contain a statement for each clinical study that the study was conducted in compliance with the institutional review board regulations in part 56 of this chapter, or was not subject to those regulations, and that it was conducted in compliance with the informed consent regulations in part 50 of this chapter, or, if the study was subject to but was not conducted in compliance with those regulations, the NDA or ANDA does not contain a brief statement of the reason for the noncompliance.

(8) The drug product that is the subject of the submission is already covered by an approved NDA or ANDA and the applicant of the submission:

(i) Has an approved NDA or ANDA for the same drug product; or

(ii) Is merely a distributor and/or repackager of the already approved drug product.

(9) The NDA is submitted as a 505(b)(2) application for a drug that is a duplicate of a listed drug and is eligible for approval under section 505(j) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(e) Regulatory deficiencies. The Agency will refuse to file an NDA or will consider an ANDA not to have been received if any of the following applies:

(1) The drug product is subject to licensing by FDA under the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 201 et seq. ) and subchapter F of this chapter.

(2) Submission of a 505(b)(2) application or an ANDA is not permitted under section 505(c)(3)(E)(ii), 505(j)(5)(F)(ii), 505A(b)(1)(A)(i)(I), 505A(c)(1)(A)(i)(I), or 505E(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(f) Outcome of FDA review. (1) Within 180 days after the date of filing, plus the period of time the review period was extended (if any), FDA will either:

(i) Approve the NDA; or

(ii) Issue a notice of opportunity for a hearing if the applicant asked FDA to provide it an opportunity for a hearing on an NDA in response to a complete response letter.

(2) Within 180 days after the date of receipt, plus the period of time the review clock was extended (if any), FDA will either approve or disapprove the ANDA. If FDA disapproves the ANDA, FDA will issue a notice of opportunity for hearing if the applicant asked FDA to provide it an opportunity for a hearing on an ANDA in response to a complete response letter.

(3) This paragraph (f) does not apply to NDAs or ANDAs that have been withdrawn from FDA review by the applicant.

[81 FR 69653, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.102 Communications between FDA and applicants.

(a) General principles. During the course of reviewing an application or an abbreviated application, FDA shall communicate with applicants about scientific, medical, and procedural issues that arise during the review process. Such communication may take the form of telephone conversations, letters, or meetings, whichever is most appropriate to discuss the particular issue at hand. Communications shall be appropriately documented in the application in accordance with 10.65 of this chapter. Further details on the procedures for communication between FDA and applicants are contained in a staff manual guide that is publicly available.

(b) Notification of easily correctable deficiencies. FDA reviewers shall make every reasonable effort to communicate promptly to applicants easily correctable deficiencies found in an application or an abbreviated application when those deficiencies are discovered, particularly deficiencies concerning chemistry, manufacturing, and controls issues. The agency will also inform applicants promptly of its need for more data or information or for technical changes in the application or the abbreviated application needed to facilitate the agency's review. This early communication is intended to permit applicants to correct such readily identified deficiencies relatively early in the review process and to submit an amendment before the review period has elapsed. Such early communication would not ordinarily apply to major scientific issues, which require consideration of the entire pending application or abbreviated application by agency managers as well as reviewing staff. Instead, major scientific issues will ordinarily be addressed in a complete response letter.

(c) Ninety-day conference. Approximately 90 days after the agency receives the application, FDA will provide applicants with an opportunity to meet with agency reviewing officials. The purpose of the meeting will be to inform applicants of the general progress and status of their applications, and to advise applicants of deficiencies that have been identified by that time and that have not already been communicated. This meeting will be available on applications for all new chemical entities and major new indications of marketed drugs. Such meetings will be held at the applicant's option, and may be held by telephone if mutually agreed upon. Such meetings would not ordinarily be held on abbreviated applications because they are not submitted for new chemical entities or new indications.

(d) End-of-review conference. At the conclusion of FDA's review of an NDA as designated by the issuance of a complete response letter, FDA will provide the applicant with an opportunity to meet with agency reviewing officials. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss what further steps need to be taken by the applicant before the application can be approved. Requests for such meetings must be directed to the director of the division responsible for reviewing the application.

(e) Other meetings. Other meetings between FDA and applicants may be held, with advance notice, to discuss scientific, medical, and other issues that arise during the review process. Requests for meetings shall be directed to the director of the division responsible for reviewing the application or abbreviated application. FDA will make every attempt to grant requests for meetings that involve important issues and that can be scheduled at mutually convenient times. However, "drop-in" visits (i.e. , an unannounced and unscheduled visit by a company representative) are discouraged except for urgent matters, such as to discuss an important new safety issue.

[57 FR 17988, Apr. 28, 1992; 57 FR 29353, July 1, 1992, as amended at 73 FR 39609, July 10, 2008]

Sec. 314.103 Dispute resolution.

(a) General. FDA is committed to resolving differences between applicants and FDA reviewing divisions with respect to technical requirements for applications or abbreviated applications as quickly and amicably as possible through the cooperative exchange of information and views.

(b) Administrative and procedural issues. When administrative or procedural disputes arise, the applicant should first attempt to resolve the matter with the division responsible for reviewing the application or abbreviated application, beginning with the consumer safety officer assigned to the application or abbreviated application. If resolution is not achieved, the applicant may raise the matter with the person designated as ombudsman, whose function shall be to investigate what has happened and to facilitate a timely and equitable resolution. Appropriate issues to raise with the ombudsman include resolving difficulties in scheduling meetings, obtaining timely replies to inquiries, and obtaining timely completion of pending reviews. Further details on this procedure are contained in a staff manual guide that is publicly available under FDA's public information regulations in part 20.

(c) Scientific and medical disputes. (1) Because major scientific issues are ordinarily communicated to applicants in a complete response letter pursuant to 314.110, the "end-of-review conference" described in 314.102(d) will provide a timely forum for discussing and resolving, if possible, scientific and medical issues on which the applicant disagrees with the agency. In addition, the "ninety-day conference" described in 314.102(c) will provide a timely forum for discussing and resolving, if possible, issues identified by that date.

(2) When scientific or medical disputes arise at other times during the review process, applicants should discuss the matter directly with the responsible reviewing officials. If necessary, applicants may request a meeting with the appropriate reviewing officials and management representatives in order to seek a resolution. Ordinarily, such meetings would be held first with the Division Director, then with the Office Director, and finally with the Center Director if the matter is still unresolved. Requests for such meetings shall be directed to the director of the division responsible for reviewing the application or abrreviated application. FDA will make every attempt to grant requests for meetings that involve important issues and that can be scheduled at mutually convenient times.

(3) In requesting a meeting designed to resolve a scientific or medical dispute, applicants may suggest that FDA seek the advice of outside experts, in which case FDA may, in its discretion, invite to the meeting one or more of its advisory committee members or other consultants, as designated by the agency. Applicants may also bring their own consultants. For major scientific and medical policy issues not resolved by informal meetings, FDA may refer the matter to one of its standing advisory committees for its consideration and recommendations.

[50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985; 50 FR 14212, Apr. 11, 1985, as amended at 57 FR 17989, Apr. 28, 1992; 73 FR 39609, July 10, 2008]

Sec. 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse.

The Food and Drug Administration will inform the Drug Enforcement Administration under section 201(f) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801) when an application or abbreviated application is submitted for a drug that appears to have an abuse potential.

[57 FR 17989, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.105 Approval of an NDA and an ANDA.

(a) FDA will approve an NDA and send the applicant an approval letter if none of the reasons in 314.125 for refusing to approve the NDA applies. FDA will issue a tentative approval letter if an NDA otherwise meets the requirements for approval under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, but cannot be approved because there is a 7-year period of orphan exclusivity for the listed drug under section 527 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 316.31 of this chapter, or if a 505(b)(2) application otherwise meets the requirements for approval under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, but cannot be approved until the conditions in 314.107(b)(3) are met; because there is a period of exclusivity for the listed drug under 314.108; because there is a period of pediatric exclusivity for the listed drug under section 505A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or because there is a period of exclusivity for the listed drug under section 505E of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. A drug product that is granted tentative approval is not an approved drug and will not be approved until FDA issues an approval after any necessary additional review of the NDA. FDA's tentative approval of a drug product is based on information available to FDA at the time of the tentative approval letter (i.e., information in the 505(b)(2) application and the status of current good manufacturing practices of the facilities used in the manufacturing and testing of the drug product) and is therefore subject to change on the basis of new information that may come to FDA's attention. A new drug product may not be marketed until the date of approval.

(b) FDA will approve an NDA and issue the applicant an approval letter on the basis of draft labeling if the only deficiencies in the NDA concern editorial or similar minor deficiencies in the draft labeling. Such approval will be conditioned upon the applicant incorporating the specified labeling changes exactly as directed, and upon the applicant submitting to FDA a copy of the final printed labeling prior to marketing.

(c) FDA will approve an NDA after it determines that the drug meets the statutory standards for safety and effectiveness, manufacturing and controls, and labeling, and an ANDA after it determines that the drug meets the statutory standards for manufacturing and controls, labeling, and, where applicable, bioequivalence. While the statutory standards apply to all drugs, the many kinds of drugs that are subject to the statutory standards and the wide range of uses for those drugs demand flexibility in applying the standards. Thus FDA is required to exercise its scientific judgment to determine the kind and quantity of data and information an applicant is required to provide for a particular drug to meet the statutory standards. FDA makes its views on drug products and classes of drugs available through guidance documents, recommendations, and other statements of policy.

(d) FDA will approve an ANDA and send the applicant an approval letter if none of the reasons in 314.127 for refusing to approve the ANDA applies. FDA will issue a tentative approval letter if an ANDA otherwise meets the requirements for approval under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, but cannot be approved because there is a 7-year period of orphan exclusivity for the listed drug under section 527 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 316.31 of this chapter, or cannot be approved until the conditions in 314.107(b)(3) or (c) are met; because there is a period of exclusivity for the listed drug under 314.108; because there is a period of pediatric exclusivity for the listed drug under section 505A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or because there is a period of exclusivity for the listed drug under section 505E of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. A drug product that is granted tentative approval is not an approved drug and will not be approved until FDA issues an approval after any necessary additional review of the ANDA. FDA's tentative approval of a drug product is based on information available to FDA at the time of the tentative approval letter (i.e., information in the ANDA and the status of current good manufacturing practices of the facilities used in the manufacturing and testing of the drug product) and is therefore subject to change on the basis of new information that may come to FDA's attention. A new drug product may not be marketed until the date of approval.

[81 FR 69654, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.106 Foreign data.

(a) General. The acceptance of foreign data in an application generally is governed by 312.120 of this chapter.

(b) As sole basis for marketing approval. An application based solely on foreign clinical data meeting U.S. criteria for marketing approval may be approved if: (1) The foreign data are applicable to the U.S. population and U.S. medical practice; (2) the studies have been performed by clinical investigators of recognized competence; and (3) the data may be considered valid without the need for an on-site inspection by FDA or, if FDA considers such an inspection to be necessary, FDA is able to validate the data through an on-site inspection or other appropriate means. Failure of an application to meet any of these criteria will result in the application not being approvable based on the foreign data alone. FDA will apply this policy in a flexible manner according to the nature of the drug and the data being considered.

(c) Consultation between FDA and applicants. Applicants are encouraged to meet with agency officials in a "presubmission" meeting when approval based solely on foreign data will be sought.

[50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985, as amended at 55 FR 11580, Mar. 29, 1990]

Sec. 314.107 Date of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA.

(a) General. A drug product may be introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce when the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA for the drug product is approved. A 505(b)(2) application or ANDA for a drug product is approved on the date FDA issues an approval letter under 314.105 for the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA.

(b) Effect of patent(s) on the listed drug. As described in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section, the status of patents listed for the listed drug(s) relied upon or reference listed drug, as applicable, must be considered in determining the first possible date on which a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA can be approved. The criteria in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section will be used to determine, for each relevant patent, the date that patent will no longer prevent approval. The first possible date on which the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA can be approved will be calculated for each patent, and the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved on the last applicable date.

(1) Timing of approval based on patent certification or statement. If none of the reasons in 314.125 or 314.127, as applicable, for refusing to approve the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA applies, and none of the reasons in paragraph (d) of this section for delaying approval applies, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved as follows:

(i) Immediately, if the applicant certifies under 314.50(i) or 314.94(a)(12) that:

(A) The applicant is aware of a relevant patent but the patent information required under section 505(b) or (c) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has not been submitted to FDA; or

(B) The relevant patent has expired; or

(C) The relevant patent is invalid, unenforceable, or will not be infringed, except as provided in paragraphs (b)(3) and (c) of this section, and the 45-day period provided for in section 505(c)(3)(C) and (j)(5)(B)(iii) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has expired; or

(D) There are no relevant patents.

(ii) Immediately, if the applicant submits an appropriate statement under 314.50(i) or 314.94(a)(12) explaining that a method-of-use patent does not claim an indication or other condition of use for which the applicant is seeking approval, except that if the applicant also submits a paragraph IV certification to the patent, then the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved as provided in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(C) of this section.

(iii) On the date specified, if the applicant certifies under 314.50(i) or 314.94(a)(12) that the relevant patent will expire on a specified date.

(2) Patent information filed after submission of 505(b)(2) application or ANDA. If the holder of the approved NDA for the listed drug submits patent information required under 314.53 after the date on which the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA was submitted to FDA, the 505(b)(2) applicant or ANDA applicant must comply with the requirements of 314.50(i)(4) and (6) and 314.94(a)(12)(vi) and (viii) regarding submission of an appropriate patent certification or statement. If the applicant submits an amendment certifying under 314.50(i)(1)(i)(A)(4 ) or 314.94(a)(12)(i)(A)(4 ) that the relevant patent is invalid, unenforceable, or will not be infringed, and complies with the requirements of 314.52 or 314.95, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved immediately upon submission of documentation of receipt of notice of paragraph IV certification under 314.52(e) or 314.95(e). The 45-day period provided for in section 505(c)(3)(C) and (j)(5)(B)(iii) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act does not apply in these circumstances.

(3) Disposition of patent litigation --(i) Approval upon expiration of 30-month period or 7 1/2 years from date of listed drug approval. (A) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(3)(ii) through (viii) of this section, if, with respect to patents for which required information was submitted under 314.53 before the date on which the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA was submitted to FDA (excluding an amendment or supplement to the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA), the applicant certifies under 314.50(i) or 314.94(a)(12) that the relevant patent is invalid, unenforceable, or will not be infringed, and the patent owner or its representative or the exclusive patent licensee brings suit for patent infringement within 45 days of receipt of the notice of certification from the applicant under 314.52 or 314.95, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved 30 months after the later of the date of the receipt of the notice of certification by any owner of the listed patent or by the NDA holder (or its representative(s)) unless the court has extended or reduced the period because of a failure of either the plaintiff or defendant to cooperate reasonably in expediting the action; or

(B) If the patented drug product qualifies for 5 years of exclusive marketing under 314.108(b)(2) and the patent owner or its representative or the exclusive patent licensee brings suit for patent infringement during the 1-year period beginning 4 years after the date of approval of the patented drug and within 45 days of receipt of the notice of certification from the applicant under 314.52 or 314.95, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved at the expiration of the 7 1/2 years from the date of approval of the NDA for the patented drug product.

(ii) Federal district court decision of invalidity, unenforceability, or non-infringement. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the district court decides that the patent is invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed (including any substantive determination that there is no cause of action for patent infringement or invalidity), the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved on:

(A) The date on which the court enters judgment reflecting the decision; or

(B) The date of a settlement order or consent decree signed and entered by the court stating that the patent that is the subject of the certification is invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed.

(iii) Appeal of Federal district court judgment of infringement. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the district court decides that the patent has been infringed, and if the judgment of the district court is appealed, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved on:

(A) The date on which the mandate is issued by the court of appeals entering judgment that the patent is invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed (including any substantive determination that there is no cause of action for patent infringement or invalidity); or

(B) The date of a settlement order or consent decree signed and entered by the court of appeals stating that the patent that is the subject of the certification is invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed.

(iv) Affirmation or non-appeal of Federal district court judgment of infringement. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the district court decides that the patent has been infringed, and if the judgment of the district court is not appealed or is affirmed, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved no earlier than the date specified by the district court in an order under 35 U.S.C. 271(e)(4)(A).

(v) Grant of preliminary injunction by Federal district court. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the district court grants a preliminary injunction prohibiting the applicant from engaging in the commercial manufacture or sale of the drug product until the court decides the issues of patent validity and infringement, and if the court later decides that:

(A) The patent is invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved as provided in paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section; or

(B) The patent is infringed, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved as provided in paragraph (b)(3)(iii) or (iv) of this section, whichever is applicable.

(vi) Written consent to approval by patent owner or exclusive patent licensee. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the patent owner or the exclusive patent licensee (or their representatives) agrees in writing that the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved any time on or after the date of the consent, approval may be granted on or after that date.

(vii) Court order terminating 30-month or 7 1/2-year period. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the court enters an order requiring the 30-month or 7 1/2-year period to be terminated, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved in accordance with the court's order.

(viii) Court order of dismissal without a finding of infringement. If before the expiration of the 30-month period, or 7 1/2 years where applicable, the court(s) enter(s) an order of dismissal, with or without prejudice, without a finding of infringement in each pending suit for patent infringement brought within 45 days of receipt of the notice of paragraph IV certification sent by the 505(b)(2) or ANDA applicant, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved on or after the date of the order.

(4) Tentative approval. FDA will issue a tentative approval letter when tentative approval is appropriate in accordance with this section. In order for a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA to be approved under paragraph (b)(3) of this section, the applicant must receive an approval letter from the Agency. Tentative approval of an NDA or ANDA does not constitute "approval" of an NDA or ANDA and cannot, absent an approval letter from the Agency, result in an approval under paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(c) Timing of approval of subsequent ANDA. (1) If an ANDA contains a paragraph IV certification for a relevant patent and the ANDA is not that of a first applicant, the ANDA is regarded as the ANDA of a subsequent applicant. The ANDA of a subsequent applicant will not be approved during the period when any first applicant is eligible for 180-day exclusivity or during the 180-day exclusivity period of a first applicant. Any applicable 180-day exclusivity period cannot extend beyond the expiration of the patent upon which the 180-day exclusivity period was based.

(2) A first applicant must submit correspondence to its ANDA notifying FDA within 30 days of the date of its first commercial marketing of its drug product or the reference listed drug. If an applicant does not notify FDA, as required in this paragraph (c)(2), of this date, the date of first commercial marketing will be deemed to be the date of the drug product's approval.

(3) If FDA concludes that a first applicant is not actively pursuing approval of its ANDA, FDA may immediately approve an ANDA(s) of a subsequent applicant(s) if the ANDA(s) is otherwise eligible for approval.

(d) Delay due to exclusivity. The Agency will also delay the approval of a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA if delay is required by the exclusivity provisions in 314.108; section 527 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 316.31 of this chapter; section 505A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or section 505E of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. When the approval of a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA is delayed under this section and 314.108; section 527 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 316.31 of this chapter; section 505A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or section 505E of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA will be approved on the latest of the days specified under this section and 314.108; section 527 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and 316.31 of this chapter; section 505A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or section 505E of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as applicable.

(e) Notification of court actions or written consent to approval. (1) The applicant must submit the following information to FDA, as applicable:

(i) A copy of any judgment by the court (district court or mandate of the court of appeals) or settlement order or consent decree signed and entered by the court (district court or court of appeals) finding a patent described in paragraph (b)(3) of this section invalid, unenforceable, or not infringed, or finding the patent valid and infringed;

(ii) Written notification of whether or not any action by the court described in paragraph (e)(1)(i) of this section has been appealed within the time permitted for an appeal;

(iii) A copy of any order entered by the court terminating the 30-month or 7 1/2-year period as described in paragraph (b)(3)(i), (ii), (vii), or (viii) of this section;

(iv) A copy of any written consent to approval by the patent owner or exclusive patent licensee described in paragraph (b)(3)(vi) of this section;

(v) A copy of any preliminary injunction described in paragraph (b)(3)(v) of this section, and a copy of any subsequent court order lifting the injunction; and

(vi) A copy of any court order pursuant to 35 U.S.C. 271(e)(4)(A) ordering that a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved no earlier than the date specified (irrespective of whether the injunction relates to a patent described in paragraph (b)(3) of this section).

(2) All information required by paragraph (e)(1) of this section must be sent to the applicant's NDA or ANDA, as appropriate, within 14 days of the date of entry by the court, the date of appeal or expiration of the time for appeal, or the date of written consent to approval, as applicable.

(f) Forty-five day period after receipt of notice of paragraph IV certification --(1) Computation of 45-day time clock. The 45-day clock described in paragraph (b)(3) of this section as to each recipient required to receive notice of paragraph IV certification under 314.52 or 314.95 begins on the day after the date of receipt of the applicant's notice of paragraph IV certification by the recipient. When the 45th day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or a Federal holiday, the 45th day will be the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or a Federal holiday.

(2) Notification of filing of legal action. (i) The 505(b)(2) or ANDA applicant must notify FDA in writing within 14 days of the filing of any legal action filed within 45 days of receipt of the notice of paragraph IV certification by any recipient. A 505(b)(2) applicant must send the notification to its NDA. An ANDA applicant must send the notification to its ANDA. The notification to FDA of the legal action must include:

(A) The 505(b)(2) application or ANDA number.

(B) The name of the 505(b)(2) or ANDA applicant.

(C) The established name of the drug product or, if no established name exists, the name(s) of the active ingredient(s), the drug product's strength, and dosage form.

(D) A statement that an action for patent infringement, identified by court, case number, and the patent number(s) of the patent(s) at issue in the action, has been filed in an appropriate court on a specified date.

(ii) A patent owner or NDA holder (or its representative(s)) may also notify FDA of the filing of any legal action for patent infringement. The notice should contain the information and be sent to the offices or divisions described in paragraph (f)(2)(i) of this section.

(iii) If the 505(b)(2) or ANDA applicant, the patent owner(s), the NDA holder, or its representative(s) does not notify FDA in writing before the expiration of the 45-day time period or the completion of the Agency's review of the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA, whichever occurs later, that a legal action for patent infringement was filed within 45 days of receipt of the notice of paragraph IV certification, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved upon expiration of the 45-day period (if the 505(b)(2) or ANDA applicant confirms that a legal action for patent infringement has not been filed) or upon completion of the Agency's review of the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA, whichever is later.

(3) Waiver. If the patent owner or NDA holder who is an exclusive patent licensee (or its representative(s)) waives its opportunity to file a legal action for patent infringement within 45 days of a receipt of the notice of certification and the patent owner or NDA holder who is an exclusive patent licensee (or its representative(s)) submits to FDA a valid waiver before the 45 days elapse, the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be approved upon completion of the Agency's review of the NDA or ANDA. FDA will only accept a waiver in the following form:

(Name of patent owner or NDA holder who is an exclusive patent licensee or its representative(s) ) has received notice from (name of applicant ) under (section 505(b)(3) or 505(j)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ) and does not intend to file an action for patent infringement against (name of applicant ) concerning the drug (name of drug ) before (date on which 45 days elapse ). (Name of patent owner or NDA holder who is an exclusive patent licensee ) waives the opportunity provided by (section 505(c)(3)(C) or 505(j)(5)(B)(iii) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ) and does not object to FDA's approval of (name of applicant )'s (505(b)(2) application or ANDA ) for (name of drug ) with an approval date on or after the date of this submission.

(g) Conversion of approval to tentative approval. If FDA issues an approval letter in error or a court enters an order requiring, in the case of an already approved 505(b)(2) application or ANDA, that the date of approval be delayed, FDA will convert the approval to a tentative approval if appropriate.

[81 FR 69655, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.108 New drug product exclusivity.

(a) Definitions. The definitions in 314.3 and the following definitions of terms apply to this section:

Approved under section 505(b) means an NDA submitted under section 505(b) and approved on or after October 10, 1962, or an application that was "deemed approved" under section 107(c)(2) of Public Law 87-781.

Bioavailability study means a study to determine the bioavailability or the pharmacokinetics of a drug.

Clinical investigation means any experiment other than a bioavailability study in which a drug is administered or dispensed to, or used on, human subjects.

Conducted or sponsored by the applicant with regard to an investigation means that before or during the investigation, the applicant was named in Form FDA-1571 filed with FDA as the sponsor of the investigational new drug application under which the investigation was conducted, or the applicant or the applicant's predecessor in interest, provided substantial support for the investigation. To demonstrate "substantial support," an applicant must either provide a certified statement from a certified public accountant that the applicant provided 50 percent or more of the cost of conducting the study or provide an explanation why FDA should consider the applicant to have conducted or sponsored the study if the applicant's financial contribution to the study is less than 50 percent or the applicant did not sponsor the investigational new drug. A predecessor in interest is an entity, e.g., a corporation, that the applicant has taken over, merged with, or purchased, or from which the applicant has purchased all rights to the drug. Purchase of nonexclusive rights to a clinical investigation after it is completed is not sufficient to satisfy this definition.

Essential to approval means, with regard to an investigation, that there are no other data available that could support approval of the NDA.

New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in any other NDA submitted under section 505(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

New clinical investigation means an investigation in humans the results of which have not been relied on by FDA to demonstrate substantial evidence of effectiveness of a previously approved drug product for any indication or of safety for a new patient population and do not duplicate the results of another investigation that was relied on by the agency to demonstrate the effectiveness or safety in a new patient population of a previously approved drug product. For purposes of this section, data from a clinical investigation previously submitted for use in the comprehensive evaluation of the safety of a drug product but not to support the effectiveness of the drug product would be considered new.

(b) Submission of and timing of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA. (1) [Reserved]

(2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September 24, 1984, in an NDA submitted under section 505(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, no person may submit a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA under section 505(j) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for a drug product that contains the same active moiety as in the new chemical entity for a period of 5 years from the date of approval of the first approved NDA, except that the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA may be submitted after 4 years if it contains a certification of patent invalidity or noninfringement described in 314.50(i)(1)(i)(A)(4 ) or 314.94(a)(12)(i)(A)(4 ).

(3) The approval of a 505(b)(2) application or ANDA described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section will occur as provided in 314.107(b)(1) or (2), unless the owner of a patent that claims the drug, the patent owner's representative, or exclusive licensee brings suit for patent infringement against the applicant during the 1-year period beginning 48 months after the date of approval of the NDA for the new chemical entity and within 45 days after receipt of the notice described at 314.52 or 314.95, in which case, approval of the 505(b)(2) application or ANDA will occur as provided in 314.107(b)(3).

(4) If an NDA:

(i) Was submitted under section 505(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act;

(ii) Was approved after September 24, 1984;

(iii) Was for a drug product that contains an active moiety that has been previously approved in another NDA under section 505(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; and

(iv) Contained reports of new clinical investigations (other than bioavailability studies) conducted or sponsored by the applicant that were essential to approval of the application, for a period of 3 years after the date of approval of the application, the Agency will not approve a 505(b)(2) application or an ANDA for the conditions of approval of the NDA, or an ANDA submitted pursuant to an approved petition under section 505(j)(2)(C) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that relies on the information supporting the conditions of approval of an original NDA.

(5) If a supplemental NDA:

(i) Was approved after September 24, 1984; and

(ii) Contained reports of new clinical investigations (other than bioavailability studies) that were conducted or sponsored by the applicant that were essential to approval of the supplemental NDA, for a period of 3 years after the date of approval of the supplemental application, the Agency will not approve a 505(b)(2) application or an ANDA for a change, or an ANDA submitted pursuant to an approved petition under section 505(j)(2)(C) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that relies on the information supporting a change approved in the supplemental NDA.

[59 FR 50368, Oct. 3, 1994, as amended at 81 FR 69657, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.110 Complete response letter to the applicant.

(a) Complete response letter. FDA will send the applicant a complete response letter if the agency determines that we will not approve the application or abbreviated application in its present form for one or more of the reasons given in 314.125 or 314.127, respectively.

(1) Description of specific deficiencies. A complete response letter will describe all of the specific deficiencies that the agency has identified in an application or abbreviated application, except as stated in paragraph (a)(3) of this section.

(2) Complete review of data. A complete response letter reflects FDA's complete review of the data submitted in an original application or abbreviated application (or, where appropriate, a resubmission) and any amendments that the agency has reviewed. The complete response letter will identify any amendments that the agency has not yet reviewed.

(3) Inadequate data. If FDA determines, after an application is filed or an abbreviated application is received, that the data submitted are inadequate to support approval, the agency might issue a complete response letter without first conducting required inspections and/or reviewing proposed product labeling.

(4) Recommendation of actions for approval. When possible, a complete response letter will recommend actions that the applicant might take to place the application or abbreviated application in condition for approval.

(b) Applicant actions. After receiving a complete response letter, the applicant must take one of following actions:

(1) Resubmission. Resubmit the application or abbreviated application, addressing all deficiencies identified in the complete response letter.

(i) A resubmission of an application or efficacy supplement that FDA classifies as a Class 1 resubmission constitutes an agreement by the applicant to start a new 2-month review cycle beginning on the date FDA receives the resubmission.

(ii) A resubmission of an application or efficacy supplement that FDA classifies as a Class 2 resubmission constitutes an agreement by the applicant to start a new 6-month review cycle beginning on the date FDA receives the resubmission.

(iii) A resubmission of an NDA supplement other than an efficacy supplement constitutes an agreement by the applicant to start a new review cycle the same length as the initial review cycle for the supplement (excluding any extension due to a major amendment of the initial supplement), beginning on the date FDA receives the resubmission.

(iv) A major resubmission of an abbreviated application constitutes an agreement by the applicant to start a new 6-month review cycle beginning on the date FDA receives the resubmission.

(v) A minor resubmission of an abbreviated application constitutes an agreement by the applicant to start a new review cycle beginning on the date FDA receives the resubmission.

(2) Withdrawal. Withdraw the application or abbreviated application. A decision to withdraw an application or abbreviated application is without prejudice to a subsequent submission.

(3) Request opportunity for hearing. Ask the agency to provide the applicant an opportunity for a hearing on the question of whether there are grounds for denying approval of the application or abbreviated application under section 505(d) or (j)(4) of the act, respectively. The applicant must submit the request to the Associate Director for Policy, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993. Within 60 days of the date of the request for an opportunity for a hearing, or within a different time period to which FDA and the applicant agree, the agency will either approve the application or abbreviated application under 314.105, or refuse to approve the application under 314.125 or abbreviated application under 314.127 and give the applicant written notice of an opportunity for a hearing under 314.200 and section 505(c)(1)(B) or (j)(5)(c) of the act on the question of whether there are grounds for denying approval of the application or abbreviated application under section 505(d) or (j)(4) of the act, respectively.

(c) Failure to take action. (1) An applicant agrees to extend the review period under section 505(c)(1) or (j)(5)(A) of the act until it takes any of the actions listed in paragraph (b) of this section. For an application or abbreviated application, FDA may consider an applicant's failure to take any of such actions within 1 year after issuance of a complete response letter to be a request by the applicant to withdraw the application, unless the applicant has requested an extension of time in which to resubmit the application. FDA will grant any reasonable request for such an extension. FDA may consider an applicant's failure to resubmit the application within the extended time period or to request an additional extension to be a request by the applicant to withdraw the application.

(2) If FDA considers an applicant's failure to take action in accordance with paragraph (c)(1) of this section to be a request to withdraw the application, the agency will notify the applicant in writing. The applicant will have 30 days from the date of the notification to explain why the application should not be withdrawn and to request an extension of time in which to resubmit the application. FDA will grant any reasonable request for an extension. If the applicant does not respond to the notification within 30 days, the application will be deemed to be withdrawn.

[73 FR 39609, July 10, 2008]

Sec. 314.120 [Reserved]
Sec. 314.122 Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed drug that is no longer marketed.

(a) An abbreviated new drug application that refers to, or a petition under section 505(j)(2)(C) of the act and 314.93 that relies on, a listed drug that has been voluntarily withdrawn from sale in the United States must be accompanied by a petition seeking a determination whether the listed drug was withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons. The petition must be submitted under 10.25(a) and 10.30 of this chapter and must contain all evidence available to the petitioner concerning the reasons for the withdrawal from sale.

(b) When a petition described in paragraph (a) of this section is submitted, the agency will consider the evidence in the petition and any other evidence before the agency, and determine whether the listed drug is withdrawn from sale for safety or effectiveness reasons, in accordance with the procedures in 314.161.

(c) An abbreviated new drug application described in paragraph (a) of this section will be disapproved, under 314.127(a)(11), and a 505(j)(2)(C) petition described in paragraph (a) of this section will be disapproved, under 314.93(e)(1)(iv), unless the agency determines that the withdrawal of the listed drug was not for safety or effectiveness reasons.

(d) Certain drug products approved for safety and effectiveness that were no longer marketed on September 24, 1984, are not included in the list. Any person who wishes to obtain marketing approval for such a drug product under an abbreviated new drug application must petition FDA for a determination whether the drug product was withdrawn from the market for safety or effectiveness reasons and request that the list be amended to include the drug product. A person seeking such a determination shall use the petition procedures established in 10.30 of this chapter. The petitioner shall include in the petition information to show that the drug product was approved for safety and effectiveness and all evidence available to the petitioner concerning the reason that marketing of the drug product ceased.

[57 FR 17990, Apr. 28, 1992; 57 FR 29353, July 1, 1992]

Sec. 314.125 Refusal to approve an NDA.

(a) The Food and Drug Administration will refuse to approve the NDA and for a new drug give the applicant written notice of an opportunity for a hearing under 314.200 on the question of whether there are grounds for denying approval of the NDA under section 505(d) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, if:

(1) FDA sends the applicant a complete response letter under 314.110;

(2) The applicant requests an opportunity for hearing for a new drug on the question of whether the NDA is approvable; and

(3) FDA finds that any of the reasons given in paragraph (b) of this section apply.

(b) FDA may refuse to approve an NDA for any of the following reasons, unless the requirement has been waived under 314.90:

(1) The methods to be used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture, processing, packing, or holding of the drug substance or the drug product are inadequate to preserve its identity, strength, quality, purity, stability, and bioavailability.

(2) The investigations required under section 505(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act do not include adequate tests by all methods reasonably applicable to show whether or not the drug is safe for use under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its proposed labeling.

(3) The results of the tests show that the drug is unsafe for use under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its proposed labeling or the results do not show that the drug product is safe for use under those conditions.

(4) There is insufficient information about the drug to determine whether the product is safe for use under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its proposed labeling.

(5) There is a lack of substantial evidence consisting of adequate and well-controlled investigations, as defined in 314.126, that the drug product will have the effect it purports or is represented to have under the conditions of use prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its proposed labeling.

(6) The proposed labeling is false or misleading in any particular.

(7) The NDA contains an untrue statement of a material fact.

(8) The drug product's proposed labeling does not comply with the requirements for labels and labeling in part 201.

(9) The NDA does not contain bioavailability or bioequivalence data required under part 320 of this chapter.

(10) A reason given in a letter refusing to file the NDA under 314.101(d), if the deficiency is not corrected.

(11) The drug will be manufactured in whole or in part in an establishment that is not registered and not exempt from registration under section 510 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and part 207.

(12) The applicant does not permit a properly authorized officer or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services an adequate opportunity to inspect the facilities, controls, and any records relevant to the NDA.

(13) The methods to be used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture, processing, packing, or holding of the drug substance or the drug product do not comply with the current good manufacturing practice regulations in parts 210 and 211.

(14) The NDA does not contain an explanation of the omission of a report of any investigation of the drug product sponsored by the applicant, or an explanation of the omission of other information about the drug pertinent to an evaluation of the NDA that is received or otherwise obtained by the applicant from any source.

(15) A nonclinical laboratory study that is described in the NDA and that is essential to show that the drug is safe for use under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its proposed labeling was not conducted in compliance with the good laboratory practice regulations in part 58 of this chapter and no reason for the noncompliance is provided or, if it is, the differences between the practices used in conducting the study and the good laboratory practice regulations do not support the validity of the study.

(16) Any clinical investigation involving human subjects described in the NDA, subject to the institutional review board regulations in part 56 of this chapter or informed consent regulations in part 50 of this chapter, was not conducted in compliance with those regulations such that the rights or safety of human subjects were not adequately protected.

(17) The applicant or contract research organization that conducted a bioavailability or bioequivalence study described in 320.38 or 320.63 of this chapter that is contained in the NDA refuses to permit an inspection of facilities or records relevant to the study by a properly authorized officer or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services or refuses to submit reserve samples of the drug products used in the study when requested by FDA.

(18) For a new drug, the NDA failed to contain the patent information required by section 505(b)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(19) The 505(b)(2) application failed to contain a patent certification or statement with respect to each listed patent for a drug product approved in an NDA that:

(i) Is pharmaceutically equivalent to the drug product for which the original 505(b)(2) application is submitted; and

(ii) Was approved before the original 505(b)(2) application was submitted.

(c) For drugs intended to treat life-threatening or severely-debilitating illnesses that are developed in accordance with 312.80 through 312.88 of this chapter, the criteria contained in paragraphs (b) (3), (4), and (5) of this section shall be applied according to the considerations contained in 312.84 of this chapter.

[50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 41524, Oct. 21, 1988; 57 FR 17991, Apr. 28, 1992; 58 FR 25926, Apr. 28, 1993; 64 FR 402, Jan. 5, 1999; 73 FR 39610, July 10, 2008; 74 FR 9766, Mar. 6, 2009; 81 FR 60221, Aug. 31, 2016; 81 FR 69658, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.126 Adequate and well-controlled studies.

(a) The purpose of conducting clinical investigations of a drug is to distinguish the effect of a drug from other influences, such as spontaneous change in the course of the disease, placebo effect, or biased observation. The characteristics described in paragraph (b) of this section have been developed over a period of years and are recognized by the scientific community as the essentials of an adequate and well-controlled clinical investigation. The Food and Drug Administration considers these characteristics in determining whether an investigation is adequate and well-controlled for purposes of section 505 of the act. Reports of adequate and well-controlled investigations provide the primary basis for determining whether there is "substantial evidence" to support the claims of effectiveness for new drugs. Therefore, the study report should provide sufficient details of study design, conduct, and analysis to allow critical evaluation and a determination of whether the characteristics of an adequate and well-controlled study are present.

(b) An adequate and well-controlled study has the following characteristics:

(1) There is a clear statement of the objectives of the investigation and a summary of the proposed or actual methods of analysis in the protocol for the study and in the report of its results. In addition, the protocol should contain a description of the proposed methods of analysis, and the study report should contain a description of the methods of analysis ultimately used. If the protocol does not contain a description of the proposed methods of analysis, the study report should describe how the methods used were selected.

(2) The study uses a design that permits a valid comparison with a control to provide a quantitative assessment of drug effect. The protocol for the study and report of results should describe the study design precisely; for example, duration of treatment periods, whether treatments are parallel, sequential, or crossover, and whether the sample size is predetermined or based upon some interim analysis. Generally, the following types of control are recognized:

(i) Placebo concurrent control. The test drug is compared with an inactive preparation designed to resemble the test drug as far as possible. A placebo-controlled study may include additional treatment groups, such as an active treatment control or a dose-comparison control, and usually includes randomization and blinding of patients or investigators, or both.

(ii) Dose-comparison concurrent control. At least two doses of the drug are compared. A dose-comparison study may include additional treatment groups, such as placebo control or active control. Dose-comparison trials usually include randomization and blinding of patients or investigators, or both.

(iii) No treatment concurrent control. Where objective measurements of effectiveness are available and placebo effect is negligible, the test drug is compared with no treatment. No treatment concurrent control trials usually include randomization.

(iv) Active treatment concurrent control. The test drug is compared with known effective therapy; for example, where the condition treated is such that administration of placebo or no treatment would be contrary to the interest of the patient. An active treatment study may include additional treatment groups, however, such as a placebo control or a dose-comparison control. Active treatment trials usually include randomization and blinding of patients or investigators, or both. If the intent of the trial is to show similarity of the test and control drugs, the report of the study should assess the ability of the study to have detected a difference between treatments. Similarity of test drug and active control can mean either that both drugs were effective or that neither was effective. The analysis of the study should explain why the drugs should be considered effective in the study, for example, by reference to results in previous placebo-controlled studies of the active control drug.

(v) Historical control. The results of treatment with the test drug are compared with experience historically derived from the adequately documented natural history of the disease or condition, or from the results of active treatment, in comparable patients or populations. Because historical control populations usually cannot be as well assessed with respect to pertinent variables as can concurrent control populations, historical control designs are usually reserved for special circumstances. Examples include studies of diseases with high and predictable mortality (for example, certain malignancies) and studies in which the effect of the drug is self-evident (general anesthetics, drug metabolism).

(3) The method of selection of subjects provides adequate assurance that they have the disease or condition being studied, or evidence of susceptibility and exposure to the condition against which prophylaxis is directed.

(4) The method of assigning patients to treatment and control groups minimizes bias and is intended to assure comparability of the groups with respect to pertinent variables such as age, sex, severity of disease, duration of disease, and use of drugs or therapy other than the test drug. The protocol for the study and the report of its results should describe how subjects were assigned to groups. Ordinarily, in a concurrently controlled study, assignment is by randomization, with or without stratification.

(5) Adequate measures are taken to minimize bias on the part of the subjects, observers, and analysts of the data. The protocol and report of the study should describe the procedures used to accomplish this, such as blinding.

(6) The methods of assessment of subjects' response are well-defined and reliable. The protocol for the study and the report of results should explain the variables measured, the methods of observation, and criteria used to assess response.

(7) There is an analysis of the results of the study adequate to assess the effects of the drug. The report of the study should describe the results and the analytic methods used to evaluate them, including any appropriate statistical methods. The analysis should assess, among other things, the comparability of test and control groups with respect to pertinent variables, and the effects of any interim data analyses performed.

(c) The Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research may, on the Director's own initiative or on the petition of an interested person, waive in whole or in part any of the criteria in paragraph (b) of this section with respect to a specific clinical investigation, either prior to the investigation or in the evaluation of a completed study. A petition for a waiver is required to set forth clearly and concisely the specific criteria from which waiver is sought, why the criteria are not reasonably applicable to the particular clinical investigation, what alternative procedures, if any, are to be, or have been employed, and what results have been obtained. The petition is also required to state why the clinical investigations so conducted will yield, or have yielded, substantial evidence of effectiveness, notwithstanding nonconformance with the criteria for which waiver is requested.

(d) For an investigation to be considered adequate for approval of a new drug, it is required that the test drug be standardized as to identity, strength, quality, purity, and dosage form to give significance to the results of the investigation.

(e) Uncontrolled studies or partially controlled studies are not acceptable as the sole basis for the approval of claims of effectiveness. Such studies carefully conducted and documented, may provide corroborative support of well-controlled studies regarding efficacy and may yield valuable data regarding safety of the test drug. Such studies will be considered on their merits in the light of the principles listed here, with the exception of the requirement for the comparison of the treated subjects with controls. Isolated case reports, random experience, and reports lacking the details which permit scientific evaluation will not be considered.

[50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985, as amended at 50 FR 21238, May 23, 1985; 55 FR 11580, Mar. 29, 1990; 64 FR 402, Jan. 5, 1999; 67 FR 9586, Mar. 4, 2002]

Sec. 314.127 Refusal to approve an ANDA.

(a) FDA will refuse to approve an ANDA for a new drug under section 505(j) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for any of the following reasons, unless the requirement has been waived under 314.99:

(1) The methods used in, or the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture, processing, and packing of the drug product are inadequate to ensure and preserve its identity, strength, quality, and purity.

(2) Information submitted with the ANDA is insufficient to show that each of the proposed conditions of use has been previously approved for the listed drug referred to in the ANDA.

(3)(i) If the reference listed drug has only one active ingredient, information submitted with the ANDA is insufficient to show that the active ingredient is the same as that of the reference listed drug;

(ii) If the reference listed drug has more than one active ingredient, information submitted with the ANDA is insufficient to show that the active ingredients are the same as the active ingredients of the reference listed drug; or

(iii) If the reference listed drug has more than one active ingredient and if the ANDAis for a drug product that has an active ingredient different from the reference listed drug:

(A) Information submitted with the ANDA is insufficient to show:

(1 ) That the other active ingredients are the same as the active ingredients of the reference listed drug; or

(2 ) That the different active ingredient is an active ingredient of a listed drug or a drug that does not meet the requirements of section 201(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or

(B) No petition to submit an ANDA for the drug product with the different active ingredient was approved under 314.93.

(4)(i) If the ANDA is for a drug product whose route of administration, dosage form, or strength purports to be the same as that of the listed drug referred to in the ANDA, information submitted in the abbreviated new drug application is insufficient to show that the route of administration, dosage form, or strength is the same as that of the reference listed drug; or

(ii) If the ANDA is for a drug product whose route of administration, dosage form, or strength is different from that of the listed drug referred to in the application, no petition to submit an ANDA for the drug product with the different route of administration, dosage form, or strength was approved under 314.93.

(5) If the ANDA was submitted under the approval of a petition under 314.93, the ANDA did not contain the information required by FDA with respect to the active ingredient, route of administration, dosage form, or strength that is not the same as that of the reference listed drug.

(6)(i) Information submitted in the ANDA is insufficient to show that the drug product is bioequivalent to the listed drug referred to in the ANDA; or

(ii) If the ANDA was submitted under a petition approved under 314.93, information submitted in the ANDA is insufficient to show that the active ingredients of the drug product are of the same pharmacological or therapeutic class as those of the reference listed drug and that the drug product can be expected to have the same therapeutic effect as the reference listed drug when administered to patients for each condition of use approved for the reference listed drug.

(7) Information submitted in the ANDA is insufficient to show that the labeling proposed for the drug is the same as the labeling approved for the listed drug referred to in the ANDA except for changes required because of differences approved in a petition under 314.93 or because the drug product and the reference listed drug are produced or distributed by different manufacturers or because aspects of the listed drug's labeling are protected by patent, or by exclusivity, and such differences do not render the proposed drug product less safe or effective than the listed drug for all remaining, nonprotected conditions of use.

(8)(i) Information submitted in the ANDA or any other information available to FDA shows that:

(A) The inactive ingredients of the drug product are unsafe for use, as described in paragraph (a)(8)(ii) of this section, under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in the labeling proposed for the drug product; or

(B) The composition of the drug product is unsafe, as described in paragraph (a)(8)(ii) of this section, under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in the proposed labeling because of the type or quantity of inactive ingredients included or the manner in which the inactive ingredients are included.

(ii)(A) FDA will consider the inactive ingredients or composition of a drug product unsafe and refuse to approve an ANDA under paragraph (a)(8)(i) of this section if, on the basis of information available to the agency, there is a reasonable basis to conclude that one or more of the inactive ingredients of the proposed drug or its composition raises serious questions of safety or efficacy. From its experience with reviewing inactive ingredients, and from other information available to it, FDA may identify changes in inactive ingredients or composition that may adversely affect a drug product's safety or efficacy. The inactive ingredients or composition of a proposed drug product will be considered to raise serious questions of safety or efficacy if the product incorporates one or more of these changes. Examples of the changes that may raise serious questions of safety or efficacy include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1 ) A change in an inactive ingredient so that the product does not comply with an official compendium.

(2 ) A change in composition to include an inactive ingredient that has not been previously approved in a drug product for human use by the same route of administration.

(3 ) A change in the composition of a parenteral drug product to include an inactive ingredient that has not been previously approved in a parenteral drug product.

(4 ) A change in composition of a drug product for ophthalmic use to include an inactive ingredient that has not been previously approved in a drug for ophthalmic use.

(5 ) The use of a delivery or a modified release mechanism never before approved for the drug.

(6 ) A change in composition to include a significantly greater content of one or more inactive ingredients than previously used in the drug product.

(7 ) If the drug product is intended for topical administration, a change in the properties of the vehicle or base that might increase absorption of certain potentially toxic active ingredients thereby affecting the safety of the drug product, or a change in the lipophilic properties of a vehicle or base, e.g., a change from an oleaginous to a water soluble vehicle or base.

(B) FDA will consider an inactive ingredient in, or the composition of, a drug product intended for parenteral use to be unsafe and will refuse to approve the ANDA unless it contains the same inactive ingredients, other than preservatives, buffers, and antioxidants, in the same concentration as the listed drug, and, if it differs from the listed drug in a preservative, buffer, or antioxidant, the ANDA contains sufficient information to demonstrate that the difference does not affect the safety or efficacy of the drug product.

(C) FDA will consider an inactive ingredient in, or the composition of, a drug product intended for ophthalmic or otic use unsafe and will refuse to approve the ANDA unless it contains the same inactive ingredients, other than preservatives, buffers, substances to adjust tonicity, or thickening agents, in the same concentration as the listed drug, and if it differs from the listed drug in a preservative, buffer, substance to adjust tonicity, or thickening agent, the ANDA contains sufficient information to demonstrate that the difference does not affect the safety or efficacy of the drug product and the labeling does not claim any therapeutic advantage over or difference from the listed drug.

(9) Approval of the listed drug referred to in the ANDA has been withdrawn or suspended for grounds described in 314.150(a) or FDA has published a notice of opportunity for hearing to withdraw approval of the reference listed drug under 314.150(a).

(10) Approval of the listed drug referred to in the ANDA has been withdrawn under 314.151 or FDA has proposed to withdraw approval of the reference listed drug under 314.151(a).

(11) FDA has determined that the reference listed drug has been withdrawn from sale for safety or effectiveness reasons under 314.161, or the reference listed drug has been voluntarily withdrawn from sale and the agency has not determined whether the withdrawal is for safety or effectiveness reasons, or approval of the reference listed drug has been suspended under 314.153, or the agency has issued an initial decision proposing to suspend the reference listed drug under 314.153(a)(1).

(12) The abbreviated new drug application does not meet any other requirement under section 505(j)(2)(A) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

(13) The abbreviated new drug application contains an untrue statement of material fact.

(14) For an ANDA submitted pursuant to an approved petition under 10.30 of this chapter and 314.93, an NDA subsequently has been approved for the change described in the approved petition.

(b) FDA may refuse to approve an ANDA for a new drug if the applicant or contract research organization that conducted a bioavailability or bioequivalence study described in 320.63 of this chapter that is contained in the ANDA refuses to permit an inspection of facilities or records relevant to the study by a properly authorized officer or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services or refuses to submit reserve samples of the drug products used in the study when requested by FDA.

[57 FR 17991, Apr. 28, 1992; 57 FR 29353, July 1, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 25927, Apr. 28, 1993; 67 FR 77672, Dec. 19, 2002; 81 FR 69658, Oct. 6, 2016]

Sec. 314.150 Withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application.

(a) The Food and Drug Administration will notify the applicant, and, if appropriate, all other persons who manufacture or distribute identical, related, or similar drug products as defined in 310.6 and 314.151(a) of this chapter and for a new drug afford an opportunity for a hearing on a proposal to withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated new drug application under section 505(e) of the act and under the procedure in 314.200, if any of the following apply:

(1) The Secretary of Health and Human Services has suspended the approval of the application or abbreviated application for a new drug on a finding that there is an imminent hazard to the public health. FDA will promptly afford the applicant an expedited hearing following summary suspension on a finding of imminent hazard to health.

(2) FDA finds:

(i) That clinical or other experience, tests, or other scientific data show that the drug is unsafe for use under the conditions of use upon the basis of which the application or abbreviated application was approved; or

(ii) That new evidence of clinical experience, not contained in the application or not available to FDA until after the application or abbreviated application was approved, or tests by new methods, or tests by methods not deemed reasonably applicable when the application or abbreviated application was approved, evaluated together with the evidence available when the application or abbreviated application was approved, reveal that the drug is not shown to be safe for use under the conditions of use upon the basis of which the application or abbreviated application was approved; or

(iii) Upon the basis of new information before FDA with respect to the drug, evaluated together with the evidence available when the application or abbreviated application was approved, that there is a lack of substantial evidence from adequate and well-controlled investigations as defined in 314.126, that the drug will have the effect it is purported or represented to have under the conditions of use prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its labeling; or

(iv) That the application or abbreviated application contains any untrue statement of a material fact; or

(v) That the patent information prescribed by section 505(c) of the act was not submitted within 30 days after the receipt of written notice from FDA specifying the failure to submit such information; or

(b) FDA may notify the applicant, and, if appropriate, all other persons who manufacture or distribute identical, related, or similar drug products as defined in 310.6, and for a new drug afford an opportunity for a hearing on a proposal to withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated new drug application under section 505(e) of the act and under the procedure in 314.200, if the agency finds:

(1) That the applicant has failed to establish a system for maintaining required records, or has repeatedly or deliberately failed to maintain required records or to make required reports under section 505(k) or 507(g) of the act and 314.80, 314.81, or 314.98, or that the applicant has refused to permit access to, or copying or verification of, its records.

(2) That on the basis of new information before FDA, evaluated together with the evidence available when the application or abbreviated application was approved, the methods used in, or the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture, processing, and packing of the drug are inadequate to ensure and preserve its identity, strength, quality, and purity and were not made adequate within a reasonable time after receipt of written notice from the agency.

(3) That on the basis of new information before FDA, evaluated together with the evidence available when the application or abbreviated application was approved, the labeling of the drug, based on a fair evaluation of all material facts, is false or misleading in any particular, and the labeling was not corrected by the applicant within a reasonable time after receipt of written notice from the agency.

(4) That the applicant has failed to comply with the notice requirements of section 510(j)(2) of the act.

(5) That the applicant has failed to submit bioavailability or bioequivalence data required under part 320 of this chapter.

(6) The application or abbreviated application does not contain an explanation of the omission of a report of any investigation of the drug product sponsored by the applicant, or an explanation of the omission of other information about the drug pertinent to an evaluation of the application or abbreviated application that is received or otherwise obtained by the applicant from any source.

(7) That any nonclinical laboratory study that is described in the application or abbreviated application and that is essential to show that the drug is safe for use under the conditions prescribed, recommended, or suggested in its labeling was not conducted in compliance with the good laboratory practice regulations in part 58 of this chapter and no reason for the noncompliance was provided or, if it was, the differences between the practices used in conducting the study and the good laboratory practice regulations do not support the validity of the study.

(8) Any clinical investigation involving human subjects described in the application or abbreviated application, subject to the institutional review board regulations in part 56 of this chapter or informed consent regulations in part 50 of this chapter, was not conducted in compliance with those regulations such that the rights or safety of human subjects were not adequately protected.

(9) That the applicant or contract research organization that conducted a bioavailability or bioequivalence study described in 320.38 or 320.63 of this chapter that is contained in the application or abbreviated application refuses to permit an inspection of facilities or records relevant to the study by a properly authorized officer or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services or refuses to submit reserve samples of the drug products used in the study when requested by FDA.

(10) That the labeling for the drug product that is the subject of the abbreviated new drug application is no longer consistent with that for the listed drug referred to in the abbreviated new drug application, except for differences approved in the abbreviated new drug application or those differences resulting from:

(i) A patent on the listed drug issued after approval of the abbreviated new drug application; or

(ii) Exclusivity accorded to the listed drug after approval of the abbreviated new drug application that do not render the drug product less safe or effective than the listed drug for any remaining, nonprotected condition(s) of use.

(c) FDA will withdraw approval of an application or abbreviated application if the applicant requests its withdrawal because the drug subject to the application or abbreviated application is no longer being marketed, provided none of the conditions listed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section applies to the drug. FDA will consider a written request for a withdrawal under this paragraph to be a waiver of an opportunity for hearing otherwise provided for in this section. Withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application under this paragraph is without prejudice to refiling.

(d) FDA may notify an applicant that it believes a potential problem associated with a drug is sufficiently serious that the drug should be removed from the market and may ask the applicant to waive the opportunity for hearing otherwise provided for under this section, to permit FDA to withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated application for the product, and to remove voluntarily the product from the market. If the applicant agrees, the agency will not make a finding under paragraph (b) of this section, but will withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated application in a notice published in the Federal Register that contains a brief summary of the agency's and the applicant's views of the reasons for withdrawal.

[57 FR 17993, Apr. 28, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 25927, Apr. 28, 1993; 64 FR 402, Jan. 5, 1999]

Sec. 314.151 Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

(a) Approval of an abbreviated new drug application approved under 314.105(d) may be withdrawn when the agency withdraws approval, under 314.150(a) or under this section, of the approved drug referred to in the abbreviated new drug application. If the agency proposed to withdraw approval of a listed drug under 314.150(a), the holder of an approved application for the listed drug has a right to notice and opportunity for hearing. The published notice of opportunity for hearing will identify all drug products approved under 314.105(d) whose applications are subject to withdrawal under this section if the listed drug is withdrawn, and will propose to withdraw such drugs. Holders of approved applications for the identified drug products will be provided notice and an opportunity to respond to the proposed withdrawal of their applications as described in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.

(b)(1) The published notice of opportunity for hearing on the withdrawal of the listed drug will serve as notice to holders of identified abbreviated new drug applications of the grounds for the proposed withdrawal.

(2) Holders of applications for drug products identified in the notice of opportunity for hearing may submit written comments on the notice of opportunity for hearing issued on the proposed withdrawal of the listed drug. If an abbreviated new drug application holder submits comments on the notice of opportunity for hearing and a hearing is granted, the abbreviated new drug application holder may participate in the hearing as a nonparty participant as provided for in 12.89 of this chapter.

(3) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, the approval of an abbreviated new drug application for a drug product identified in the notice of opportunity for hearing on the withdrawal of a listed drug will be withdrawn when the agency has completed the withdrawal of approval of the listed drug.

(c)(1) If the holder of an application for a drug identified in the notice of opportunity for hearing has submitted timely comments but does not have an opportunity to participate in a hearing because a hearing is not requested or is settled, the submitted comments will be considered by the agency, which will issue an initial decision. The initial decision will respond to the comments, and contain the agency's decision whether there are grounds to withdraw approval of the listed drug and of the abbreviated new drug applications on which timely comments were submitted. The initial decision will be sent to each abbreviated new drug application holder that has submitted comments.

(2) Abbreviated new drug application holders to whom the initial decision was sent may, within 30 days of the issuance of the initial decision, submit written objections.

(3) The agency may, at its discretion, hold a limited oral hearing to resolve dispositive factual issues that cannot be resolved on the basis of written submissions.

(4) If there are no timely objections to the initial decision, it will become final at the expiration of 30 days.

(5) If timely objections are submitted, they will be reviewed and responded to in a final decision.

(6) The written comments received, the initial decision, the evidence relied on in the comments and in the initial decision, the objections to the initial decision, and, if a limited oral hearing has been held, the transcript of that hearing and any documents submitted therein, shall form the record upon which the agency shall make a final decision.

(7) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, any abbreviated new drug application whose holder submitted comments on the notice of opportunity for hearing shall be withdrawn upon the issuance of a final decision concluding that the listed drug should be withdrawn for grounds as described in 314.150(a). The final decision shall be in writing and shall constitute final agency action, reviewable in a judicial proceeding.

(8) Documents in the record will be publicly available in accordance with 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed on public display in the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, room. 1-23, 12420 Parklawn Dr., Rockville, MD 20857, promptly upon receipt in that office.

(d) If the agency determines, based upon information submitted by the holder of an abbreviated new drug application, that the grounds for withdrawal of the listed drug are not applicable to a drug identified in the notice of opportunity for hearing, the final decision will state that the approval of the abbreviated new drug application for such drug is not withdrawn.

[57 FR 17994, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.152 Notice of withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug.

If the Food and Drug Administration withdraws approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug, FDA will publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing the withdrawal of approval. If the application or abbreviated application was withdrawn for grounds described in 314.150(a) or 314.151, the notice will announce the removal of the drug from the list of approved drugs published under section 505(j)(6) of the act and shall satisfy the requirement of 314.162(b).

[57 FR 17994, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.153 Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application.

(a) Suspension of approval. The approval of an abbreviated new drug application approved under 314.105(d) shall be suspended for the period stated when:

(1) The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, under the imminent hazard authority of section 505(e) of the act or the authority of this paragraph, suspends approval of a listed drug referred to in the abbreviated new drug application, for the period of the suspension;

(2) The agency, in the notice described in paragraph (b) of this section, or in any subsequent written notice given an abbreviated new drug application holder by the agency, concludes that the risk of continued marketing and use of the drug is inappropriate, pending completion of proceedings to withdraw or suspend approval under 314.151 or paragraph (b) of this section; or

(3) The agency, under the procedures set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, issues a final decision stating the determination that the abbreviated application is suspended because the listed drug on which the approval of the abbreviated new drug application depends has been withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness or has been suspended under paragraph (b) of this section. The suspension will take effect on the date stated in the decision and will remain in effect until the agency determines that the marketing of the drug has resumed or that the withdrawal is not for safety or effectiveness reasons.

(b) Procedures for suspension of abbreviated new drug applications when a listed drug is voluntarily withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons. (1) If a listed drug is voluntarily withdrawn from sale, and the agency determines that the withdrawal from sale was for reasons of safety or effectiveness, the agency will send each holder of an approved abbreviated new drug application that is subject to suspension as a result of this determination a copy of the agency's initial decision setting forth the reasons for the determination. The initial decision will also be placed on file with the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, room 1-23, 12420 Parklawn Dr., Rockville, MD 20857.

(2) Each abbreviated new drug application holder will have 30 days from the issuance of the initial decision to present, in writing, comments and information bearing on the initial decision. If no comments or information is received, the initial decision will become final at the expiration of 30 days.

(3) Comments and information received within 30 days of the issuance of the initial decision will be considered by the agency and responded to in a final decision.

(4) The agency may, in its discretion, hold a limited oral hearing to resolve dispositive factual issues that cannot be resolved on the basis of written submissions.

(5) If the final decision affirms the agency's initial decision that the listed drug was withdrawn for reasons of safety or effectiveness, the decision will be published in the Federal Register in compliance with 314.152, and will, except as provided in paragraph (b)(6) of this section, suspend approval of all abbreviated new drug applications identified under paragraph (b)(1) of this section and remove from the list the listed drug and any drug whose approval was suspended under this paragraph. The notice will satisfy the requirement of 314.162(b). The agency's final decision and copies of materials on which it relies will also be filed with the Division of Dockets Management (address in paragraph (b)(1) of this section).

(6) If the agency determines in its final decision that the listed drug was withdrawn for reasons of safety or effectiveness but, based upon information submitted by the holder of an abbreviated new drug application, also determines that the reasons for the withdrawal of the listed drug are not relevant to the safety and effectiveness of the drug subject to such abbreviated new drug application, the final decision will state that the approval of such abbreviated new drug application is not suspended.

(7) Documents in the record will be publicly available in accordance with 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed on public display in the Division of Dockets Management (address in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) promptly upon receipt in that office.

[57 FR 17995, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.160 Approval of an application or abbreviated application for which approval was previously refused, suspended, or withdrawn.

Upon the Food and Drug Administration's own initiative or upon request of an applicant, FDA may, on the basis of new data, approve an application or abbreviated application which it had previously refused, suspended, or withdrawn approval. FDA will publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing the approval.

[57 FR 17995, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.161 Determination of reasons for voluntary withdrawal of a listed drug.

(a) A determination whether a listed drug that has been voluntarily withdrawn from sale was withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons may be made by the agency at any time after the drug has been voluntarily withdrawn from sale, but must be made:

(1) Prior to approving an abbreviated new drug application that refers to the listed drug;

(2) Whenever a listed drug is voluntarily withdrawn from sale and abbreviated new drug applications that referred to the listed drug have been approved; and

(3) When a person petitions for such a determination under 10.25(a) and 10.30 of this chapter.

(b) Any person may petition under 10.25(a) and 10.30 of this chapter for a determination whether a listed drug has been voluntarily withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons. Any such petition must contain all evidence available to the petitioner concerning the reason that the drug is withdrawn from sale.

(c) If the agency determines that a listed drug is withdrawn from sale for safety or effectiveness reasons, the agency will, except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, publish a notice of the determination in the Federal Register.

(d) If the agency determines under paragraph (a) of this section that a listed drug is withdrawn from sale for safety and effectiveness reasons and there are approved abbreviated new drug applications that are subject to suspension under section 505(j)(5) of the act, FDA will initiate a proceeding in accordance with 314.153(b).

(e) A drug that the agency determines is withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons will be removed from the list, under 314.162. The drug may be relisted if the agency has evidence that marketing of the drug has resumed or that the withdrawal is not for safety or effectiveness reasons. A determination that the drug is not withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons may be made at any time after its removal from the list, upon the agency's initiative, or upon the submission of a petition under 10.25(a) and 10.30 of this chapter. If the agency determines that the drug is not withdrawn for safety or effectiveness reasons, the agency shall publish a notice of this determination in the Federal Register. The notice will also announce that the drug is relisted, under 314.162(c). The notice will also serve to reinstate approval of all suspended abbreviated new drug applications that referred to the listed drug.

[57 FR 17995, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.162 Removal of a drug product from the list.

(a) FDA will remove a previously approved new drug product from the list for the period stated when:

(1) The agency withdraws or suspends approval of a new drug application or an abbreviated new drug application under 314.150(a) or 314.151 or under the imminent hazard authority of section 505(e) of the act, for the same period as the withdrawal or suspension of the application; or

(2) The agency, in accordance with the procedures in 314.153(b) or 314.161, issues a final decision stating that the listed drug was withdrawn from sale for safety or effectiveness reasons, or suspended under 314.153(b), until the agency determines that the withdrawal from the market has ceased or is not for safety or effectiveness reasons.

(b) FDA will publish in the Federal Register a notice announcing the removal of a drug from the list.

(c) At the end of the period specified in paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section, FDA will relist a drug that has been removed from the list. The agency will publish in the Federal Register a notice announcing the relisting of the drug.

[57 FR 17996, Apr. 28, 1992]

Sec. 314.170 Adulteration and misbranding of an approved drug.

All drugs, including those the Food and Drug Administration approves under section 505 of the act and this part, are subject to the adulteration and misbranding provisions in sections 501, 502, and 503 of the act. FDA is authorized to regulate approved new drugs by regulations issued through informal rulemaking under sections 501, 502, and 503 of the act.

[50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985. Redesignated at 57 FR 17983, Apr. 28, 1992, and amended at 64 FR 402, Jan. 5, 1999]

Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321, 331, 351, 352, 353, 355, 355a, 355f, 356, 356a, 356b, 356c, 356e, 360cc, 371, 374, 379e, 379k-1.
Source: 50 FR 7493, Feb. 22, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

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