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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

MAUDE Adverse Event Report: MEDTRONIC NEUROMODULATION UNKNOWN IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATOR STIMULATOR, ELECTRICAL, IMPLANTED, FOR PARKINSONIAN TREMOR

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MEDTRONIC NEUROMODULATION UNKNOWN IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATOR STIMULATOR, ELECTRICAL, IMPLANTED, FOR PARKINSONIAN TREMOR Back to Search Results
Model Number NEU_INS_STIMULATOR
Event Type  Injury  
Manufacturer Narrative

It was not possible to ascertain specific device information from the article or to match the events reported with previously reported events. Correspondence has been sent to the author of the article inquiring about individual patient information and additional information regarding the reported events. Concomitant medical products: product id: 3387, lot# unknown, product type: lead. (b)(4).

 
Event Description

Sriram, a. , foote, k. D. , oyama, g. , kwak, j. , zeilman, p. R. , okun, m. S. Brittle dyskinesia following stn but not gpi deep brain stimulation. Tremor and other hyperkinetic movements (new york, n. Y. ). 2014;4:242. Doi: 10. 7916/d8ks6ppr summary: the aim was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of difficult to manage dyskinesia associated with subthalamic nucleus (stn) deep brain stimulation (dbs). A small subset of stn dbs patients experience troublesome dyskinesia despite optimal programming and medication adjustments. This group of patients has been referred to by some practitioners as brittle stn dbs-induced dyskinesia, drawing on comparisons with brittle diabetics experiencing severe blood sugar regulation issues and on a single description by mclellan in 1982. We sought to describe, and also to investigate how often the ¿¿brittle¿¿ phenomenon occurs in a relatively large dbs practice. An institutional review board-approved patient database was reviewed, and all stn and globus pallidus internus (gpi) dbs patients who had surgery at the university of florida from july 2002 to july 2012 were extracted for analysis. There were 179 total stn dbs patients and, of those, four stn dbs (2. 2%) cases were identified as having dyskinesia that could not be managed without the induction of an ¿¿off state,¿¿ or by the precipitation of a severe dyskinesia despite vigorous stimulation and medication adjustments. Of 75 gpi dbs cases reviewed, none (0%) was identified as having brittle dyskinesia. One stn dbs patient was successfully rescued by bilateral gpi dbs. Understanding the potential risk factors for postoperative troublesome and brittle dyskinesia may have an impact on the initial surgical target selection (stn vs. Gpi) in dbs therapy. Rescue gpi dbs therapy may be a viable treatment option, though more cases will be required to verify this observation. Reported event: one (b)(6) male patient experienced right upper extremity and right lower extremity dyskinesia at both the 1 and the 2 contacts on the deep brain stimulation (dbs) lead following left-sided subthalamic nucleus (stn) dbs implant. It was noted that the 1 and 2 dbs lead contacts corresponded to the best therapeutic benefit during programming sessions. The reporter stated that multiple programming strategies were employed, including attempts at slow stimulation titrations, and the use of a more dorsal dbs contact site. Reportedly, the dyskinesia only abated when the dbs was turned off. It was noted that attempts were made to commensurately decrease carbidopa/levodopa dosage in combination with stimulation changes, but this reportedly worsened the patient¿s off state, though at low medication dosages dyskinesia abated. The reporter stated that the patient experienced a similar clinical scenario when the right stn dbs was added. Reportedly, at settings that improved his freezing of gait, the patient had bothersome left lower extremity dyskinesia. It was noted that many other attempted settings failed to capture his gait freezing and the off symptoms. The reporter stated that the patient underwent rescue bilateral staged globus pallidus internus (gpi) dbs in a single operative sitting, and following programming, the dyskinesia completely abated, and the patient was able to maintain a smooth on medication state. The source literature included the following device specifics: lead model 3387 further information has been requested; a supplemental report will be submitted if additional information is received.

 
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Brand NameUNKNOWN IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATOR
Type of DeviceSTIMULATOR, ELECTRICAL, IMPLANTED, FOR PARKINSONIAN TREMOR
Manufacturer (Section D)
MEDTRONIC NEUROMODULATION
800 53rd ave ne
minneapolis MN 55421 120
Manufacturer (Section G)
MEDTRONIC NEUROMODULATION
7000 central avenue ne rcw215
minneapolis MN 55432
Manufacturer Contact
diane wolf
7000 central avenue ne rcw215
minneapolis , MN 55432
7635263987
MDR Report Key3976613
Report Number3007566237-2014-02167
Device Sequence Number1
Product CodeMHY
Report Source Manufacturer
Source Type Literature,Health Professional
Reporter Occupation Physician
Type of Report Initial
Report Date 07/08/2014
1 Device Was Involved in the Event
1 Patient Was Involved in the Event
Date FDA Received08/04/2014
Is This An Adverse Event Report? Yes
Is This A Product Problem Report? No
Device Operator Health Professional
Device MODEL NumberNEU_INS_STIMULATOR
Device Catalogue NumberNEU_INS_STIMULATOR
Device LOT NumberUNKNOWN
Was Device Available For Evaluation? No
Is The Reporter A Health Professional? Yes
Date Manufacturer Received07/08/2014
Was Device Evaluated By Manufacturer? No Answer Provided
Is The Device Single Use? Yes
Is this a Reprocessed and Reused Single-Use Device? No
Type of Device Usage Initial

Patient TREATMENT DATA
Date Received: 08/04/2014 Patient Sequence Number: 1
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